Greenlee County, Arizona

Last updated
Greenlee County
Benjamin F. Billingsley house from SE 1.JPG
Greenlee County, Arizona seal.png
Seal
Map of Arizona highlighting Greenlee County.svg
Location within the U.S. state of Arizona
Arizona in United States.svg
Arizona's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 33°06′06″N109°16′07″W / 33.101666666667°N 109.26861111111°W / 33.101666666667; -109.26861111111
CountryFlag of the United States.svg United States
StateFlag of Arizona.svg  Arizona
FoundedMarch 10, 1909
Seat Clifton
Largest townClifton
Area
  Total1,848 sq mi (4,790 km2)
  Land1,843 sq mi (4,770 km2)
  Water5.3 sq mi (14 km2)  0.3%%
Population
 (2010)
  Total8,437
  Estimate 
(2018)
9,483
  Density4.6/sq mi (1.8/km2)
Time zone UTC−7 (Mountain)
Congressional district 1st
Website www.co.greenlee.az.us
1901 Clifton railroad station, now used by the Chamber of Commerce and other community organizations. Clifton, AZ train station.jpg
1901 Clifton railroad station, now used by the Chamber of Commerce and other community organizations.
Azurite specimen from the great Morenci Mine. Azurite-284714.jpg
Azurite specimen from the great Morenci Mine.

Greenlee County is a county located in the southeastern part of the U.S. state of Arizona. As of the 2010 census its population was 8,437, [1] making it the least populous county in Arizona. The county seat is Clifton.

Contents

The economy of Greenlee County is dominated by the Morenci Mine, the largest copper mining operation in North America, and one of the largest copper mines in the world. As of 2008, the mine complex, owned by Freeport-McMoRan, had about 4,000 employees.

History

Greenlee County was created in 1909 and named for Mason Greenlee who was an early settler in the Clifton area. It was Arizona's 14th county and formed from part of Graham County, which opposed the formation because Graham County would lose considerable revenue. Clifton has always been the county seat.

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 1,848 square miles (4,790 km2), of which 1,843 square miles (4,770 km2) is land and 5.3 square miles (14 km2) (0.3%) is water. [2] It is the second-smallest county by area in Arizona.

Adjacent counties

National protected areas

Major Highways

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1920 15,362
1930 9,886−35.6%
1940 8,698−12.0%
1950 12,80547.2%
1960 11,509−10.1%
1970 10,330−10.2%
1980 11,40610.4%
1990 8,008−29.8%
2000 8,5476.7%
2010 8,437−1.3%
Est. 20189,483 [3] 12.4%
U.S. Decennial Census [4]
1790–1960 [5] 1900–1990 [6]
1990–2000 [7] 2010–2018 [1]

2000 census

As of the census [8] of 2000, there were 8,547 people, 3,117 households, and 2,266 families living in the county. The population density was 5 people per square mile (2/km²). There were 3,744 housing units at an average density of 2 per square mile (1/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 74.17% White, 0.51% Black or African American, 1.66% Native American, 0.15% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 20.02% from other races, and 3.45% from two or more races. 43.07% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 25.19% reported speaking Spanish at home .

There were 3,117 households out of which 39.20% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 58.30% were married couples living together, 9.00% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.30% were non-families. 24.50% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.30% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.73 and the average family size was 3.26.

In the county, the population was spread out with 31.70% under the age of 18, 7.50% from 18 to 24, 28.20% from 25 to 44, 22.60% from 45 to 64, and 9.90% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females, there were 109.20 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 108.00 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $39,384, and the median income for a family was $43,523. Males had a median income of $38,952 versus $23,333 for females. The per capita income for the county was $15,814. About 8.00% of families and 9.90% of the population were below the poverty line, including 11.10% of those under age 18 and 8.70% of those age 65 or over.

2010 census

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 8,437 people, 3,188 households, and 2,152 families living in the county. [9] The population density was 4.6 inhabitants per square mile (1.8/km2). There were 4,372 housing units at an average density of 2.4 per square mile (0.93/km2). [10] The racial makeup of the county was 77.2% white, 2.3% American Indian, 1.1% black or African American, 0.5% Asian, 0.1% Pacific islander, 15.0% from other races, and 3.8% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 47.9% of the population. [9] In terms of ancestry, 12.9% were English, 12.1% were German, 10.6% were Irish, and 1.6% were American. [11]

Of the 3,188 households, 37.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 49.5% were married couples living together, 9.6% had a female householder with no husband present, 32.5% were non-families, and 27.8% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.64 and the average family size was 3.21. The median age was 34.8 years. [9]

The median income for a household in the county was $48,696 and the median income for a family was $51,729. Males had a median income of $50,446 versus $34,171 for females. The per capita income for the county was $21,281. About 9.4% of families and 13.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 17.8% of those under age 18 and 13.2% of those age 65 or over. [12]

Politics

Greenlee County used to be the most reliably Democratic county in Arizona. It voted for the Democratic presidential candidate in every election from 1912 to 1996, being one of only seven Mountain State counties to support George McGovern. [lower-alpha 1] However, it has supported the Republican candidate in each of the five most recent presidential elections.

Presidential election results
Greenlee County vote
by party in presidential elections
[13] [14]
Year Republican Democratic Others
2016 57.3%1,89233.1% 1,0929.6% 316
2012 53.3%1,59243.9% 1,3102.8% 84
2008 58.6%1,71239.9% 1,1651.5% 43
2004 61.9%1,89937.4% 1,1460.7% 22
2000 54.7%1,61941.1% 1,2164.2% 125
1996 34.2% 1,15951.7%1,75514.1% 479
1992 36.3% 1,45142.5%1,69521.2% 847
1988 46.2% 1,52652.5%1,7331.3% 43
1984 47.6% 1,80151.9%1,9630.6% 21
1980 40.6% 1,53754.0%2,0435.3% 202
1976 36.1% 1,53261.2%2,6012.7% 114
1972 45.6% 1,75852.2%2,0132.3% 87
1968 27.4% 1,02664.9%2,4347.8% 291
1964 26.5% 1,13273.6%3,147
1960 29.9% 1,31370.0%3,0690.1% 4
1956 39.7% 1,78460.3%2,711
1952 31.3% 1,37768.7%3,019
1948 23.0% 68069.9%2,0697.2% 212
1944 27.3% 73972.3%1,9560.3% 9
1940 22.1% 61977.6%2,1750.3% 9
1936 12.3% 21886.2%1,5261.5% 27
1932 19.3% 37779.7%1,5581.0% 19
1928 42.1% 68557.4%9350.5% 8
1924 30.0% 40457.0%76813.1% 176
1920 44.5% 90555.6%1,131
1916 28.8% 67263.9%1,4927.3% 170
1912 9.3% 10955.5%65235.2% 413

The county is located in Arizona's 1st congressional district, which has a Cook Partisan Voting Index of R+2 and is represented by Democratic Congressman Tom O'Halleran. In the Arizona House of Representatives it is represented by Republican Becky Nutt and Republican Drew John. [15] In the Arizona Senate it is represented by Republican Gail Griffin. [16]

Communities

Map of incorporated and unincorporated areas in Greenlee County Greenlee County Incorporated and Unincorporated areas.svg
Map of incorporated and unincorporated areas in Greenlee County

Towns

Ghost Towns

Census-designated places

Unincorporated communities

County population ranking

The population ranking of the following table is based on the 2010 census of Greenlee County. [17] [18]

county seat

RankCity/Town/etc.Population (2010 Census)Municipal typeIncorporated
1Clifton 3,311Town
2 Morenci 1,489 CDP
3 Duncan 696Town1938
4York557CDP
5Franklin92CDP

See also

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Clifton, Arizona Town in Arizona, United States

Clifton is a town in and the county seat of Greenlee County, Arizona, United States, along the San Francisco River. The population of the town was 3,311 at the 2010 census, with a 2018 population estimate of 3,700 It was a site of the Arizona copper mine strike of 1983.

Duncan, Arizona Town in Arizona, United States

Duncan is a town in Greenlee County, Arizona, United States. As of the 2010 census, the population of the town was 696. In 2018 the estimated population was 789.

Morenci, Arizona Census-designated place in Arizona, United States

Morenci is a census-designated place (CDP) and company town in Greenlee County, Arizona, United States, and was founded by the Detroit Copper Mining Company of Arizona. The population was 2000 at the 2000 census and 1,489 at the 2010 census. The biggest employer in Morenci and the owner of the town is Freeport-McMoRan, the owner of the Morenci Mine, the largest copper mining operation in North America, and one of the largest copper mines in the world. The town was a site of the Arizona Copper Mine Strike of 1983. The large open-pit mine is north of the town.

Clifton, Ohio Village in Ohio, United States

Clifton is a village in Clark and Greene counties in the U.S. state of Ohio and is home to the Clifton Mill, one of the largest water powered grist mills still in existence. The population was 152 at the 2010 census.

References

  1. 1 2 "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on June 7, 2011. Retrieved May 18, 2014.
  2. "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 23, 2012. Retrieved August 23, 2015.
  3. "Population and Housing Unit Estimates" . Retrieved May 10, 2019.
  4. "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on April 26, 2015. Retrieved May 18, 2014.
  5. "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved May 18, 2014.
  6. "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 18, 2014.
  7. "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 18, 2014.
  8. "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on September 11, 2013. Retrieved May 14, 2011.
  9. 1 2 3 "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved January 20, 2016.
  10. "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved January 20, 2016.
  11. "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved January 20, 2016.
  12. "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved January 20, 2016.
  13. "Dave Leip's Atlas of United States Presidential Elections" . Retrieved June 11, 2011.
  14. Scammon, Richard M. (compiler); America at the Polls: A Handbook of Presidential Election Statistics 1920-1964; pp. 487-489 ISBN   0405077114
  15. "Member Roster at Arizona Legislature". Archived from the original on 2009-05-03. Retrieved 2009-05-05.
  16. "Member Roster for Arizona Senate". Archived from the original on 2009-05-13. Retrieved 2009-05-05.
  17. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2013-12-23. Retrieved 2013-02-10.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  18. https://www.census.gov/geo/maps-data/maps/block/2010/

Notes

  1. The others were Deer Lodge and Silver Bow in Montana, Costilla and Pitkin in Colorado, plus San Miguel and Rio Arriba in New Mexico

Coordinates: 33°06′06″N109°16′07″W / 33.10167°N 109.26861°W / 33.10167; -109.26861