List of Arizona state symbols

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Location of the state of Arizona in the United States of America Map of USA AZ.svg
Location of the state of Arizona in the United States of America

The following is a list of symbols of the U.S. state of Arizona. The majority of the items in the list are officially recognized after a law passed by the state legislature. Most of the symbols were adopted in the 20th century. The first symbol was the motto, which was made official in 1864 for the Arizona Territory. Arizona became the second state to adopt a "state firearm" after Utah adopted the Browning M1911. [1]

Contents

Insignia

TypeSymbolDescriptionYearImage
Flag The flag of Arizona The flag of Arizona does not contain a state seal but consists of 13 rays of red and gold (the conquistador colors of the flag of Spain) on the top half, representing the original 13 American colonies, as well as symbolizing Arizona's picturesque sunsets. There is a copper colored star in the center representing Arizona's copper-mining industry. The rest of the flag is colored blue, representing liberty. [2] 1917 Flag of Arizona.svg
Seal The seal of Arizona The Great Seal of the State of Arizona is ringed by the words "Great Seal of the State of Arizona" on the top, and 1912 the year of Arizona's statehood, on the bottom. The motto Ditat Deus (Latin: "God Enriches"), lies in the center of the seal. In the background is a range of mountains with the sun rising behind the peaks1911 [3] Arizona-StateSeal.svg

Mottoes and Nickname

TypeSymbolYearImage
Motto Latin: Ditat Deus
(God enriches)
1864 [4] Arizona-StateSeal.svg
Nickname The Grand Canyon State [5] [A] Traditional

Plant

TypeSymbolYearImage
Flower Saguaro cactus blossom
(Carnegiea gigantea)
1931 [6] The Cactaceae Vol II, plate XXII filtered.jpg
Tree Palo Verde
(Parkinsonia florida)
1954 [7] Cercidium floridum whole.jpg

Animal

TypeSymbolYearImage
Amphibian Arizona tree frog
( Hyla eximia ) [B]
1986 [8] Hyla eximia.jpg
Bird Cactus Wren
(Harpagornis incendei)
1973 [9] Campylorhynchus brunneicapillus 20061226.jpg
Butterfly Two-tailed swallowtail
(Papilio multicaudata)
2001 [10] Papilio multicaudata.jpg
Dinosaur Sonorasaurus
(Sonorasaurus thompsoni)
2018 [11] [12] Sonorasaurus thompsoni.jpg
Fish Apache trout
(Oncorhynchus gilae apache) [C]
1986 [7] [8]
Mammal Ring-tailed cat
(Bassariscus astutus) [D]
1986 [13] [8] Bassariscus.jpg
Reptile Arizona ridge-nosed rattlesnake
(Crotalus willardi willardi) [E]
1986 [8] Ridgenose.jpg

Geology

TypeSymbolYearImage
Fossil Petrified wood 1988 [14] ArizonaPetrifiedWood.jpg
Gemstone Turquoise 1974 [15] [16] Turquoise.pebble.700pix.jpg
Metal Copper 2015 [17] [18] NatCopper.jpg
Mineral Wulfenite 2017 [19] [20] Wulfenite-tcw02a.jpg
Soil Casa Grande N/A [21]

Culture

TypeSymbolYearImage
Colors Federal Blue and old gold 1915 [22]
Firearm Colt Single Action Army 2011 [1] 1956prime2.jpg
Neckwear Bolo tie 1973 [23] Bola tie.jpg
Songs "Arizona March Song"
"Arizona"
1919 [24]
1982 [25]
Drink Lemonade 2019 [26] [27] LemonadeJuly2006.JPG

Other

See also

Notes

A Other nicknames include: the Apache State, the Aztec State, the Baby State, the Copper State, the Valentine State, Italy of America, the Sand Hill State, and the Sunset State.
B The Arizona treefrog was chosen by students around Arizona. The students studied 800 species in an effort to select four finalists for every category. Three other amphibians were considered: the Colorado river toad, red-spotted toad, and the spadefoot toad.
C The Apache trout was chosen by students around Arizona. The students studied 800 species in an effort to select four finalists for every category. Three other fish were considered: the Colorado river squawfish, the desert pupfish, and the bonytail chub.
D The ring-tailed cat was chosen by students around Arizona. The students studied 800 species in an effort to select four finalists for every category. Three other mammals were considered: the whitetail deer, the desert bighorn sheep, and the javelina.
E The Arizona ridge-nosed rattlesnake was chosen by students around Arizona. The students studied 800 species in an effort to select four finalists for every category. Three other reptiles were considered: the gila monster, the desert tortoise, and the regal horned lizard.

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References

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