United States congressional delegations from Arizona

Last updated
Arizona's congressional districts since 2013 Arizona Congressional Districts, 113th Congress.tif
Arizona's congressional districts since 2013

These are tables of congressional delegations from Arizona to the United States House of Representatives and the United States Senate.

Arizona state of the United States of America

Arizona is a state in the southwestern region of the United States. It is also part of the Western and the Mountain states. It is the sixth largest and the 14th most populous of the 50 states. Its capital and largest city is Phoenix. Arizona shares the Four Corners region with Utah, Colorado, and New Mexico; its other neighboring states are Nevada and California to the west and the Mexican states of Sonora and Baja California to the south and southwest.

United States House of Representatives lower house of the United States Congress

The United States House of Representatives is the lower chamber of the United States Congress, the Senate being the upper chamber. Together they compose the legislature of the United States.

United States Senate Upper house of the United States Congress

The United States Senate is the upper chamber of the United States Congress, which along with the United States House of Representatives—the lower chamber—comprises the legislature of the United States. The Senate chamber is located in the north wing of the Capitol, in Washington, D.C.

Contents

House of Representatives

Current Representatives

List of members of the Arizonan United States House delegation, their terms in office, district boundaries, and the district political ratings according to the CPVI. The delegation has a total of 9 members, with 5 Democrats and 4 Republicans.

Democratic Party (United States) Major political party in the United States

The Democratic Party is one of the two major contemporary political parties in the United States, along with the Republican Party. Tracing its heritage back to Thomas Jefferson and James Madison's Democratic-Republican Party, the modern-day Democratic Party was founded around 1828 by supporters of Andrew Jackson, making it the world's oldest active political party.

Republican Party (United States) Major political party in the United States

The Republican Party, also referred to as the GOP, is one of the two major political parties in the United States; the other is its historic rival, the Democratic Party.

DistrictIncumbent CPVI Map
Current member
(Residence)
PartyBeginning of service
1st Tom O'Halleran official portrait.jpg
Tom O'Halleran
(Yavapai County)
DemocraticJanuary 3, 2017R+2 Arizona US Congressional District 1 (since 2013).tif
2nd Ann Kirkpatrick, official portrait, 116th Congress.jpg
Ann Kirkpatrick
(Tucson)
DemocraticJanuary 3, 2019R+1 Arizona US Congressional District 2 (since 2013).tif
3rd Raul Grijalva Official Portrait, 2015.jpg
Raúl Grijalva
(Yuma)
DemocraticJanuary 3, 2003D+13 Arizona US Congressional District 3 (since 2013).tif
4th Paul Gosar official portrait September 2016.jpg
Paul Gosar
(Prescott)
RepublicanJanuary 3, 2011R+21 Arizona US Congressional District 4 (since 2013).tif
5th Andy Biggs official portrait.jpg
Andy Biggs
(Gilbert)
RepublicanJanuary 3, 2017R+15 Arizona US Congressional District 5 (since 2013).tif
6th David Schweikert 2011-06-15.jpg
David Schweikert
(Scottsdale)
RepublicanJanuary 3, 2011R+9 Arizona US Congressional District 6 (since 2013).tif
7th Ruben Gallego official photo.jpg
Ruben Gallego
(Phoenix)
DemocraticJanuary 3, 2015D+23 Arizona US Congressional District 7 (since 2013).tif
8th Debbie Lesko, official portrait, 115th Congress.jpg
Debbie Lesko
(Peoria)
RepublicanApril 24, 2018R+13 Arizona US Congressional District 8 (since 2013).tif
9th Greg Stanton, official portrait, 116th Congress.jpg
Greg Stanton
(Phoenix)
DemocraticJanuary 3, 2019D+4 Arizona US Congressional District 9 (since 2013).tif

1863 – 1912: 1 non-voting delegate

Congress Delegate
38th
(1863–1865)
Charles Debrille Poston (R)
39th
(1865–1867)
John Noble Goodwin (R)
40th
(1867–1869)
Coles Bashford (I)
41st
(1869–1871)
Richard Cunningham McCormick (U)
42nd
(1871–1873)
43rd
(1873–1875)
44th
(1875–1877)
Hiram Sanford Stevens (D)
45th
(1877–1879)
46th
(1879–1881)
John Goulder Campbell (D)
47th
(1881–1883)
Granville Henderson Oury (D)
48th
(1883–1885)
49th
(1885–1887)
Curtis Coe Bean (R)
50th
(1887–1889)
Marcus Aurelius Smith (D)
51st
(1889–1891)
52nd
(1891–1893)
53rd
(1893–1895)
54th
(1895–1897)
Nathan Oakes Murphy (R)
55th
(1897–1899)
Marcus Aurelius Smith (D)
56th
(1899–1901)
John Frank Wilson (D)
57th
(1901–1903)
Marcus Aurelius Smith (D)
58th
(1903–1905)
John Frank Wilson (D)
59th
(1905–1907)
Marcus Aurelius Smith (D)
60th
(1907–1909)
61st
(1909–1911)
Ralph Henry Cameron (R)
62nd
(1911–1912)

1912 – 1943: 1 seat

Congress At-large
62nd
(1912–1913)
Carl Hayden (D)
63rd
(1913–1915)
64th
(1915–1917)
65th
(1917–1919)
66th
(1919–1921)
67th
(1921–1923)
68th
(1923–1925)
69th
(1925–1927)
70th
(1927–1929)
Lewis W. Douglas (D)
71st
(1929–1931)
72nd
(1931–1933)
73rd
(1933–1935)
Isabella Selmes Greenway (D)
74th
(1935–1937)
75th
(1937–1939)
John R. Murdock (D)
76th
(1939–1941)
77th
(1941–1943)

1943 – 1963: 2 seats

After the 1940 census, a second seat was added. For six years, the seats were elected at-large statewide on a general ticket. In 1949, districts were used.

General ticket representation is voting system, analogous to block voting, but where voters elect parties, not candidates. The parties then select their representatives to fill out elected office.

CongressElected statewide on a General ticket
1st seat 2nd seat
78th
(1943–1945)
John R. Murdock (D) Richard F. Harless (D)
79th
(1945–1947)
80th
(1947–1949)
 Districts
1st 2nd
81st
(1949–1951)
John R. Murdock (D) Harold A. Patten (D)
82nd
(1951–1953)
83rd
(1953–1955)
John Jacob Rhodes (R)
84th
(1955–1957)
Stewart Lee Udall (D)
85th
(1957–1959)
86th
(1959–1961)
87th
(1961–1963)
Mo Udall (D)

1963 – 1973: 3 seats

CongressDistrict
1st 2nd 3rd
88th
(1963–1965)
John Jacob Rhodes (R) Mo Udall (D) George Frederick Senner, Jr. (D)
89th
(1965–1967)
90th
(1967–1969)
Sam Steiger (R)
91st
(1969–1971)
92nd
(1971–1973)

1973 – 1983: 4 seats

CongressDistrict
1st 2nd 3rd 4th
93rd
(1973–1975)
John Jacob Rhodes (R) Mo Udall (D) Sam Steiger (R) John Bertrand Conlan (R)
94th
(1975–1977)
95th
(1977–1979)
Bob Stump (D) Eldon D. Rudd (R)
96th
(1979–1981)
97th
(1981–1983)
Bob Stump (R)

1983 – 1993: 5 seats

CongressDistrict
1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th
98th
(1983–1985)
John McCain (R) Mo Udall (D) Bob Stump (R) Eldon D. Rudd (R) James Francis McNulty, Jr. (D)
99th
(1985–1987)
Jim Kolbe (R)
100th
(1987–1989)
John Jacob Rhodes III (R) Jon Kyl (R)
101st
(1989–1991)
102nd
(1991–1993)
Ed Pastor (D)

1993 – 2003: 6 seats

CongressDistrict
1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th
103rd
(1993–1995)
Samuel G. Coppersmith (D) Ed Pastor (D) Bob Stump (R) Jon Kyl (R) Jim Kolbe (R) Karan English (D)
104th
(1995–1997)
Matt Salmon (R) John B. Shadegg (R) J. D. Hayworth (R)
105th
(1997–1999)
106th
(1999–2001)
107th
(2001–2003)
Jeff Flake (R)

2003 – 2013: 8 seats

CongressDistrict
1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th
108th
(2003–2005)
Rick Renzi (R) Trent Franks (R) John B. Shadegg (R) Ed Pastor (D) J. D. Hayworth (R) Jeff Flake (R) Raúl Grijalva (D) Jim Kolbe (R)
109th
(2005–2007)
110th
(2007–2009)
Harry Mitchell (D) Gabrielle Giffords (D)
111th
(2009–2011)
Ann Kirkpatrick (D)
112th
(2011–2013)
Paul Gosar (R) Ben Quayle (R) David Schweikert (R)
Ron Barber (D)

2013 – Present: 9 seats

After the 2010 Census, Arizona gained one seat.

CongressDistrict
1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th
113th
(2013–2015)
Ann Kirkpatrick (D) Ron Barber (D) Raúl Grijalva (D) Paul Gosar (R) Matt Salmon (R) David Schweikert (R) Ed Pastor (D) Trent Franks (R) Kyrsten Sinema (D)
114th
(2015–2017)
Martha McSally (R) Ruben Gallego (D)
115th
(2017–2019)
Tom O'Halleran (D) Andy Biggs (R)
Debbie Lesko (R)
116th
(2019–2021)
Ann Kirkpatrick (D) Greg Stanton (D)

United States Senate

Current delegation
Kyrsten Sinema (cropped).jpg
Senator Kyrsten Sinema
(D)
Sen. Martha McSally official Senate headshot.jpg
Senator Martha McSally
(R)
Class 1CongressClass 3
Henry Fountain Ashurst (D)  62nd (1912–1913)  Marcus Aurelius Smith (D)
63rd (1913–1915)
64th (1915–1917) 
  65th (1917–1919)
66th (1919–1921)
67th (1921–1923)  Ralph Henry Cameron (R)
  68th (1923–1925)
69th (1925–1927)
70th (1927–1929)  Carl Hayden (D)
  71st (1929–1931)
72nd (1931–1933)
73rd (1933–1935) 
  74th (1935–1937)
75th (1937–1939)
76th (1939–1941) 
Ernest W. McFarland (D)  77th (1941–1943)
78th (1943–1945)
79th (1945–1947) 
  80th (1947–1949)
81st (1949–1951)
82nd (1951–1953) 
Barry Goldwater (R)  83rd (1953–1955)
84th (1955–1957)
85th (1957–1959) 
  86th (1959–1961)
87th (1961–1963)
88th (1963–1965) 
Paul Jones Fannin (R)  89th (1965–1967)
90th (1967–1969)
91st (1969–1971)  Barry Goldwater (R)
  92nd (1971–1973)
93rd (1973–1975)
94th (1975–1977) 
Dennis DeConcini (D)  95th (1977–1979)
96th (1979–1981)
97th (1981–1983) 
  98th (1983–1985)
99th (1985–1987)
100th (1987–1989)  John McCain (R)
  101st (1989–1991)
102nd (1991–1993)
103rd (1993–1995) 
Jon Kyl (R)  104th (1995–1997)
105th (1997–1999)
106th (1999–2001) 
  107th (2001–2003)
108th (2003–2005)
109th (2005–2007) 
  110th (2007–2009)
111th (2009–2011)
112th (2011–2013) 
Jeff Flake (R)  113th (2013–2015)
114th (2015–2017)
115th (2017–2019) 
Jon Kyl (R)
Kyrsten Sinema (D) [2]   116th (2019–2021) Martha McSally (R)

Living former senators

As of January 2019, there are three living former senators.

SenatorTerm of officeDate of birth (and age)
Dennis DeConcini 1977 – 1995May 8, 1937 (age 81)
Jon Kyl 1995-2013, 2018April 25, 1942 (age 77)
Jeff Flake 2013-2019December 31, 1962 (age 56)

Key

Key to party colors and abbreviations for members of the U.S. Congress
American (Know Nothing) (K-N)
Adams (A),
Anti-Jacksonian (Anti-J),
National Republican (NR)
Anti-Administration (Anti-Admin)
Anti-Masonic (Anti-M)
Conservative (Con)
Democratic (D)
Dixiecrat (Dix),
States' rights (SR)
Democratic-Republican (D-R)
Farmer–Labor (FL)
Federalist (F)
Free Soil (FS)
Free Silver (FSv)
Fusion (FU)
Greenback (GB)
Jacksonian (J)
Nonpartisan League (NPL)
Nullifier (N)
Opposition Northern (O)
Opposition Southern (O)
Populist (Pop)
Pro-Administration (Pro-Admin)
Progressive (Prog)
Prohibition (Proh)
Readjuster (Rea)
Republican (R)
Socialist (Soc)
Unionist (U)
Whig (W)
Independent ,
None,
or Unaffiliated

See also

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References

  1. "The national atlas". nationalatlas.gov. Archived from the original on February 22, 2014. Retrieved February 2, 2014.
  2. Sinema and McSally were sworn in on the same day but Sinema has seniority over McSally due to length of service in the House of Representatives. McSally, who was defeated by Sinema in the 2018 General Election, was appointed to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of Kyl.