109th United States Congress

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109th United States Congress
108th  
  110th
Dennis Hastert 2.jpg
January 3, 2005 – January 3, 2007
Senate President Dick Cheney (R)
Senate President pro tem Ted Stevens (R)
House Speaker Dennis Hastert (R)
Members100 senators
435 members of the House
5 non-voting delegates
Senate Majority Republican
House Majority Republican
Sessions
1st: January 4, 2005 – December 22, 2005
2nd: January 3, 2006 – December 8, 2006

The One Hundred Ninth United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, composed of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives, from January 3, 2005 to January 3, 2007, during the fifth and sixth years of George W. Bush's presidency. House members were elected in the 2004 elections on November 2, 2004. Senators were elected in three classes in the 2000 elections on November 7, 2000, 2002 elections on November 5, 2002, or 2004 elections on November 2, 2004. The apportionment of seats in the House of Representatives was based on the Twenty-second Census of the United States in 2000. Both chambers had a Republican majority, the same party as President Bush.

Contents

Major events

Major legislation

Enacted

President George W. Bush signing the Federal Funding Accountability and Transparency Act of 2006 in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building, on September 26, 2006. George Bush signs the Federal Funding Accountability and Transparency Act of 2006.jpg
President George W. Bush signing the Federal Funding Accountability and Transparency Act of 2006 in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building, on September 26, 2006.
With Sen. Bill Frist (R-TN) looking on, President George W. Bush signs into law Pub.L. 109-353, the North Korea Nonproliferation Act of 2006, on October 13, 2006. With Sen. Bill Frist (R-Tenn.) looking on, President George W. Bush signs into law S-3728, the North Korea Nonproliferation Act of 2006, Friday, Oct. 13, 2006, in the Oval Office.jpg
With Sen. Bill Frist (R-TN) looking on, President George W. Bush signs into law Pub.L.   109–353, the North Korea Nonproliferation Act of 2006, on October 13, 2006.

Proposed, but not enacted

More information: Complete index of Public and Private Laws for 109th Congress at U.S. Government Printing Office

Hearings

Party summary

Senate

Party standings in the Senate throughout the 109th Congress
44 Democratic senators
55 Republican senators
1 Independent senator, caucusing with Democrats US Senate 44-1-55.svg
Party standings in the Senate throughout the 109th Congress
  44 Democratic senators
  55 Republican senators
  1 Independent senator, caucusing with Democrats

The party summary for the Senate remained the same during the entire 109th Congress. On January 16, 2006, Democrat Jon Corzine resigned, but Democrat Bob Menendez was appointed and took Corzine's seat the next day.

Party
(shading shows control)
TotalVacant
Democratic
(D)
Independent
(I)
Republican
(R)
End of previous congress 48 1 511000
Begin 44 1 55 100 0
End
Final voting share44.0% 1.0% 55.0%
Beginning of next congress 49 2 491000

House of Representatives

Due to resignations and special elections, Republicans lost a net of three seats; Democrats gained one seat; three seats were left vacant; and one seat which was vacant at the beginning of the Congress was filled. All seats were filled though special elections. (See Changes in membership, below.)

AffiliationParty
(Shading shows control)
Total
Democratic Independent Republican Vacant
End of previous Congress 20412274323
Begin20112324341
March 10, 20052024350
April 29, 20052314341
August 2, 20052304332
September 6, 20052314341
December 1, 20052304332
December 7, 20052314341
January 16, 20062014332
June 9, 20062304323
June 13, 20062314332
September 29, 20062304323
November 3, 20062294314
November 13, 20062022304332
December 31, 20062294323
Final voting share47.0%53.0%
Non-voting members 41050
Beginning of next Congress 23302024350

Leadership

Section contents: Senate: Majority (R), Minority (D)House: Majority (R), Minority (D)

Senate

Senate President
Senate President pro Tempore

Majority (Republican) leadership

Minority (Democratic) leadership

House of Representatives

Speaker of the House

Majority (Republican) leadership

Minority (Democratic) leadership

Members

Senate

In this Congress, Class 1 meant their term ended with this Congress, requiring reelection in 2006; Class 2 meant their term began in the last Congress, requiring reelection in 2008; and Class 3 meant their term began in this Congress, requiring reelection in 2010.

House of Representatives

Initial percentage of members of the House of Representatives from each party by state at the opening of the 109th Congress in January 2005 109th US congress house of reps.svg
Initial percentage of members of the House of Representatives from each party by state at the opening of the 109th Congress in January 2005

The names of members of the House of Representatives are preceded by their district numbers.

Changes in membership

Members who came and left during this Congress.

Senate

State
(class)
VacatorReason for changeSuccessorDate of successor's
formal installation [lower-alpha 1]
New Jersey
(1)
Jon Corzine (D)Corzine resigned to become Governor of New Jersey on January 17, 2006. Bob Menendez (D)January 18, 2006
Connecticut
(1)
Joseph Lieberman (D)Change of party affiliation Joseph Lieberman (ID)August 9, 2006

House of Representatives

DistrictVacatorReason for changeSuccessorDate of successor's
formal installation [lower-alpha 1]
California 5th NoneRepresentative Bob Matsui (D) died January 1, 2005 — before the end of the previous Congress. A special election was held March 8, 2005 Doris Matsui (D)March 10, 2005
Ohio 2nd Rob Portman (R)Resigned April 29, 2005 to become the United States Trade Representative. A special election was held August 2, 2005 Jean Schmidt (R)September 6, 2005 [9]
California 48th Christopher Cox (R)Resigned August 2, 2005 to become chairman of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. A special election was held December 6, 2005 John Campbell (R)December 7, 2005 [10]
California 50th Duke Cunningham (R)Resigned December 1, 2005 after pleading guilty to conspiracy for bribes and tax evasion. A special election was held June 6, 2006 Brian Bilbray (R)June 13, 2006 [11]
New Jersey 13th Bob Menendez (D)Resigned January 16, 2006 to become a U.S. Senator. A special election was held November 7, 2006 Albio Sires (D)November 13, 2006 [12]
Texas 22nd Tom DeLay (R)Resigned June 9, 2006 after a series of criminal indictments. A special election was held November 6, 2006 Shelley Sekula-Gibbs (R)November 13, 2006 [13]
Florida 16th Mark Foley (R)Resigned September 29, 2006 after a teen sex scandal.Remained vacant until the next Congress. [14]
Ohio 18th Bob Ney (R)Resigned November 3, 2006 after pleading guilty to conspiracy.
Nevada 2nd Jim Gibbons (R)Resigned December 31, 2006 to become Governor of Nevada.

Committees

Lists of committees and their party leaders, for members (House and Senate) of the committees and their assignments, go into the Official Congressional Directory at the bottom of the article and click on the link (1 link), in the directory after the pages of terms of service, you will see the committees of the Senate, House (Standing with Subcommittees, Select and Special) and Joint and after the committee pages, you will see the House/Senate committee assignments in the directory, on the committees section of the House and Senate in the Official Congressional Directory, the committee's members on the first row on the left side shows the chairman of the committee and on the right side shows the ranking member of the committee.

Senate

House of Representatives

Joint committees

Caucuses

Employees and legislative agency directors

Legislative branch agency directors

Senate

House of Representatives

See also: Rules of the House, Rule 2: "Other officers and officials"

See also

Notes

  1. 1 2 This is the date the member was seated or an oath administered, not necessarily the same date her/his service began.

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References

  1. 1 2 Shepard, Scott (December 10, 2006). "109th may be the real 'do nothing' Congress". Cox News Service. Atlanta, GA.[ dead link ]
  2. USA Today Editorial (December 11, 2006). "Our view on Congress wrapping up: 109th Congress' big success: Lowering the achievement bar". USA Today. MacLean, VA. Archived from the original on October 21, 2007.
  3. Cochran, John (May 12, 2006). "'Do-Nothing Congress' Raises Critics' Ire". This Week with George Stephanopoulos. ABC.
  4. "The Cafferty File: Do-Nothing Congress". The Situation Room with Wolf Blitzer. December 4, 2006. CNN. cnn.com
  5. "Goodbye To The Do-Nothing Congress". Face The Nation. December 10, 2006. CBS. cbsnews.com
  6. Dobbs, Lou (August 2, 2006). "Five-weeks off for 'do-nothing Congress'". CNN. Retrieved November 12, 2006.
  7. Mann, T.; Ornstein, N. (2006). The Broken Branch: How Congress Is Failing America and How to Get It Back on Track. N.Y., N.Y.: OUP USA. Archived from the original on September 1, 2007.
  8. 1 2 3 4 5 The Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party (DFL) is affiliated with the United States Democratic Party.
  9. Ohio 2nd : A primary election was held on June 14, 2005. A runoff election was held on August 2, 2005. Jean Schmidt won and took her seat the next month. See Ohio 2nd congressional district election, 2005.
  10. California 48th : A primary election was held on October 4, 2005. A runoff election was held on December 6, 2005. John Campbell won and took his seat the next day.See California 48th Congressional District Election, 2005.
  11. California 50th : A primary election was held on April 11, 2006. A runoff election was held on June 6, 2006. Brian Bilbray won and took his seat one week later.See California 50th congressional district special election, 2006.
  12. New Jersey 13th : An election was held to fill the unexpired term at the November 7, 2006 General Election. Sires was sworn in on November 13. See New Jersey 13th congressional district special election, 2006.
  13. An election was held to fill the unexpired term at the November 7, 2006 General Election. Sekula-Gibbs took her seat on November 13.
  14. 2 Election Winners to Fill Vacancies" Archived 2007-10-10 at the Wayback Machine , via wtopnews.com