115th United States Congress

Last updated

115th United States Congress
114th  
  116th
2017 US Capitol 02.jpg
January 3, 2017 – January 3, 2019
Senate President Joe Biden (D),
until January 20, 2017
Mike Pence (R),
from January 20, 2017
Senate President pro tem Orrin Hatch (R)
House Speaker Paul Ryan (R)
Members100 senators
435 members of the House
6 non-voting delegates
Senate Majority Republican
House Majority Republican
Sessions
1st: January 3, 2017 – January 3, 2018 [1]
2nd: January 3, 2018 – January 3, 2019 [1]

The One Hundred Fifteenth United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, composed of the Senate and the House of Representatives. It met in Washington, D.C. from January 3, 2017, to January 3, 2019, during the final weeks of Barack Obama's presidency and the first two years of Donald Trump's presidency.

United States Federal republic in North America

The United States of America (USA), commonly known as the United States or America, is a country comprising 50 states, a federal district, five major self-governing territories, and various possessions. At 3.8 million square miles, the United States is the world's third or fourth largest country by total area and is slightly smaller than the entire continent of Europe's 3.9 million square miles. With a population of over 327 million people, the U.S. is the third most populous country. The capital is Washington, D.C., and the largest city by population is New York City. Forty-eight states and the capital's federal district are contiguous in North America between Canada and Mexico. The State of Alaska is in the northwest corner of North America, bordered by Canada to the east and across the Bering Strait from Russia to the west. The State of Hawaii is an archipelago in the mid-Pacific Ocean. The U.S. territories are scattered about the Pacific Ocean and the Caribbean Sea, stretching across nine official time zones. The extremely diverse geography, climate, and wildlife of the United States make it one of the world's 17 megadiverse countries.

United States Senate Upper house of the United States Congress

The United States Senate is the upper chamber of the United States Congress, which along with the United States House of Representatives—the lower chamber—comprises the legislature of the United States. The Senate chamber is located in the north wing of the Capitol, in Washington, D.C.

United States House of Representatives lower house of the United States Congress

The United States House of Representatives is the lower chamber of the United States Congress, the Senate being the upper chamber. Together they compose the legislature of the United States.

Contents

Several political scientists described the legislative accomplishments of this Congress as modest, considering that both Congress and the Presidency were under unified Republican Party control. [2] [3] [4] [5] According to a contemporary study, "House and Senate GOP majorities struggled to legislate: GOP fissures and an undisciplined, unpopular president frequently undermined the Republican agenda. Most notably, clashes within and between the two parties strained old ways of doing business." [3]

Republican Party (United States) Major political party in the United States

The Republican Party, also referred to as the GOP, is one of the two major political parties in the United States; the other is its historic rival, the Democratic Party.

Major events

President Donald Trump addressing Congress, with Vice President Mike Pence and House Speaker Paul Ryan. Trump joint session of congress.jpg
President Donald Trump addressing Congress, with Vice President Mike Pence and House Speaker Paul Ryan.
Senator Dianne Feinstein interviewing Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh. Kavanaugh Feinstein 20180906.png
Senator Dianne Feinstein interviewing Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh.

United Nations Security Council Resolution 2334 was adopted on 23 December 2016. It concerns the Israeli settlements in "Palestinian territories occupied since 1967, including East Jerusalem". The resolution passed in a 14–0 vote by members of the U.N. Security Council (UNSC). Four members with United Nations Security Council veto power, China, France, Russia, and the United Kingdom, voted for the resolution, but the United States abstained.

Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act United States federal statute

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA), often shortened to the Affordable Care Act (ACA) or nicknamed Obamacare, is a United States federal statute enacted by the 111th United States Congress and signed into law by President Barack Obama on March 23, 2010. Together with the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 amendment, it represents the U.S. healthcare system's most significant regulatory overhaul and expansion of coverage since the passage of Medicare and Medicaid in 1965.

Reconciliation is a legislative process of the United States Congress that expedites the passage of certain budgetary legislation in the United States Senate. The Senate filibuster effectively requires a 60-vote super-majority for the passage of most legislation in the Senate, but reconciliation provides a process to prevent the use of the filibuster and thereby allow the passage of a bill with simple majority support in the Senate. The reconciliation procedure also exists in the United States House of Representatives, but reconciliation has had a less significant impact on that body.

Major legislation

Enacted

Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2017 United States appropriation law

The Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2017, also known as the 2017 omnibus spending bill, is a United States appropriations legislation passed during the 115th Congress. It provides spending permission to several federal agencies for fiscal year 2017, and it authorizes $1.1 trillion in spending.

An Act of Congress is a statute enacted by the United States Congress. It can either be a Public Law, relating to the general public, or a Private Law, relating to specific institutions or individuals.

Countering Americas Adversaries Through Sanctions Act 2017 U.S. law sanctioning Iran, North Korea and Russia

The Countering America's Adversaries Through Sanctions Act, CAATSA, is a United States federal law that imposed sanctions on Iran, North Korea, and Russia. The bill was passed on July 27, 2017, 98–2 in the Senate, after having passed the House 419–3. On August 2, 2017, President Donald Trump signed it into law while stating that he believed the legislation was "seriously flawed".

Proposed

American Health Care Act of 2017 Proposed U.S. law

The American Health Care Act of 2017 often shortened to the AHCA, or nicknamed Trumpcare, was a bill in the 115th United States Congress. The bill, which was passed by the United States House of Representatives but not by the United States Senate, would have partially repealed the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA).

Financial CHOICE Act is a bill introduced to the 115th United States Congress in 2017 that would, if enacted, roll back "many of the protections in the landmark Dodd-Frank 2010 federal law, including the "strongest" Wall Street "regulations from the financial crisis. The legislation passed the House 233–186 on June 8, 2017. The 600-page legislation was crafted by Congressman Jeb Hensarling (R-TX), chair of the House Financial Services Committee.

Party summary

Resignations and new members are discussed in the "Changes in membership" section, below.

Senate

AffiliationParty
(shading indicates majority caucus)
TotalVacant
Democratic Independent Republican
End of previous Congress 442541000
Begin (January 3, 2017)462521000
February 8, 2017 [lower-alpha 1] 51991
February 9, 2017 [lower-alpha 1] 521000
January 2, 2018 [lower-alpha 2] 45991
January 3, 2018 [lower-alpha 1] [lower-alpha 2] 47511000
April 1, 2018 [lower-alpha 3] 50991
April 2, 2018 [lower-alpha 3] 511000
August 25, 2018 [lower-alpha 4] 50991
September 4, 2018 [lower-alpha 4] 511000
December 31, 2018 [lower-alpha 4] 50991
Final voting share49.5%50.5%
Beginning of the next Congress 45252991

House of Representatives

House membership (from December 31, 2018)
196 Democrats 236 Republicans

3 vacant United States House of Representatives, 196-236 (3V).svg
House membership (from December 31, 2018)
     196 Democrats     236 Republicans
     3 vacant
Ideological divisions in the House (on March 27, 2017)
69 Progressive Caucus Freedom Caucus 33
113 Party Democrats Party Republicans 156
11 Blue Dog Coalition Tuesday Group 48

4 vacant United States House of Representatives, 2017.svg
Ideological divisions in the House (on March 27, 2017)
     69 Progressive Caucus       Freedom Caucus 33     
     113 Party Democrats       Party Republicans 156     
     11 Blue Dog Coalition       Tuesday Group 48     
     4 vacant
Party
(shading indicates majority caucus)
TotalVacant
Democratic Independent Republican
End of previous Congress 18702464332
Begin (January 3, 2017)19402414350
January 23, 2017 [lower-alpha 5] 2404341
January 24, 2017 [lower-alpha 6] 1934332
February 10, 2017 [lower-alpha 7] 2394323
February 16, 2017 [lower-alpha 8] 2384314
March 1, 2017 [lower-alpha 9] 2374305
April 11, 2017 [lower-alpha 5] [lower-alpha 10] 2384314
May 25, 2017 [lower-alpha 9] [lower-alpha 10] 2394323
June 6, 2017 [lower-alpha 6] [lower-alpha 10] 1944332
June 20, 2017 [lower-alpha 7] [lower-alpha 8] [lower-alpha 10] 2414350
June 30, 2017 [lower-alpha 11] 2404341
October 21, 2017 [lower-alpha 12] 2394332
November 7, 2017 [lower-alpha 11] [lower-alpha 10] 2404341
December 5, 2017 [lower-alpha 13] 1934332
December 8, 2017 [lower-alpha 14] 2394323
January 15, 2018 [lower-alpha 15] 2384314
March 13, 2018 [lower-alpha 12] [lower-alpha 10] 1944323
March 16, 2018 [lower-alpha 16] 1934314
April 6, 2018 [lower-alpha 17] 2374305
April 23, 2018 [lower-alpha 18] 2364296
April 24, 2018 [lower-alpha 14] [lower-alpha 10] 2374305
April 27, 2018 [lower-alpha 19] 2364296
May 12, 2018 [lower-alpha 20] 2354287
June 30, 2018 [lower-alpha 17] [lower-alpha 10] 2364296
August 7, 2018 [lower-alpha 15] [lower-alpha 10] 2374305
September 10, 2018 [lower-alpha 21] 2364296
September 30, 2018 [lower-alpha 22] 2354287
November 6, 2018 [lower-alpha 13] [lower-alpha 16] [lower-alpha 18] [lower-alpha 19] [lower-alpha 20] 1972364332
December 31, 2018 [lower-alpha 23] 1964323
Final voting share45.4%0.0%54.6% 
Non-voting members 31260
Beginning of the next Congress 23501994341 [28]

Leadership

Section contents: Senate: Majority (R), Minority (D)House: Majority (R), Minority (D)

Senate

Senate President
Biden 2013 (cropped).jpg
Joe Biden (D),
until January 20, 2017
Vice President Pence Official Portrait (cropped).jpg
Mike Pence (R),
from January 20, 2017

Majority (Republican) leadership

Minority (Democratic) leadership

House of Representatives

House Speaker

Majority (Republican) leadership

Minority (Democratic) leadership

Demographics

Note: Demographics are accurate as of the commencement of the 115th Congress on January 3, 2017.
Democratic women in the House of Representatives wearing white to honor women's suffrage. (March 2017) -womenwearwhite (32503590144).jpg
Democratic women in the House of Representatives wearing white to honor women's suffrage. (March 2017)

The average age of members of the House of Representatives during the 115th Congress was 57.8 years, while the average age of U.S. senators was 61.8 years. [32]

The most common occupation of senators prior to being elected to their posts was law, followed by public service/politics and business. In the House of Representatives, business was the dominant prior occupation, followed by public service/politics and law. [32] In the 115th Congress, 94.1% of House members and 100% of Senators had attained a bachelor's degree or a higher degree; this was a historically high level of education for a United States Congress. In addition, 167 members of the House and 55 members of the Senate had law degrees. Only 18 members of Congress had no college education. [32]

Ethnic minorities in the 115th Congress consisted of 52 African American members, 45 Hispanic or Latino members, 18 Asian-American or Pacific Islander members, and two members of Native American ancestry. [32] Women comprised 20.1% of the membership in the 115th Congress, which had 109 women and 326 men. This represented an increase of 21 women from the 114th Congress. [32]

Seven openly LGBT members served in the 115th Congress. Tammy Baldwin, [33] Jared Polis, [34] Sean Patrick Maloney, Mark Takano, David Cicilline, and Mark Pocan are openly gay, while Kyrsten Sinema is openly bisexual. [35]

The majority of the 115th Congress was religiously affiliated, with 90.7% identifying as Christians. Approximately half of the Christians were Protestant. Other religious faiths of congressmembers in the 115th Congress included Buddhism, Hinduism, Islam, and Judaism. [32]

Members

Senate

The numbers refer to their Senate classes. All of the class 3 seats were contested in the November 2016 elections. Class 1 terms end with this Congress, requiring re-election in 2018; Class 2 began in the last Congress, requiring re-election in 2020; and Class 3 began in this Congress, requiring re-election in 2022.

House of Representatives

All 435 seats were filled by the regular elections on November 8, 2016, or subsequent special elections thereafter.

Changes in membership

Senate

State
(class)
VacatorReason for changeSuccessorDate of successor's
formal installation [lower-alpha 26]
Alabama
(2)
Jeff Sessions
(R)
Resigned February 8, 2017, to become U.S. Attorney General. [37]
Successor appointed February 9, 2017, to continue the term. [38]
Luther Strange
(R)
February 9, 2017
Minnesota
(2)
Al Franken
(D)
Resigned January 2, 2018, amid a sexual misconduct scandal. [39]
Successor appointed January 2, 2018, to continue the term. [36]
Appointee was later elected to finish the term.
Tina Smith
(D)
January 3, 2018
Alabama
(2)
Luther Strange
(R)
Appointment expired January 3, 2018, following a special election. [40] [41]
Successor elected December 12, 2017, to finish the term and qualified January 3, 2018. [42]
Doug Jones
(D)
January 3, 2018
Mississippi
(2)
Thad Cochran
(R)
Resigned April 1, 2018, for health reasons. [43]
Successor appointed April 2, 2018, to continue the term. [lower-alpha 10]
Appointee was later elected to finish the term.
Cindy Hyde-Smith
(R)
April 9, 2018
Arizona
(3)
John McCain
(R)
Died August 25, 2018. [44]
Successor appointed September 4, 2018, to continue the term. [45]
Jon Kyl
(R)
September 5, 2018
Arizona
(3)
Jon Kyl
(R)
Resigned December 31, 2018. [27]
Successor was seated in next Congress.
Vacant until the next Congress

House of Representatives

DistrictVacatorReason for changeSuccessorDate of successor's
formal installation [lower-alpha 26]
Kansas 4 Mike Pompeo
(R)
Resigned January 23, 2017, to become Director of the Central Intelligence Agency. [46]
A special election was held April 11, 2017. [47]
Ron Estes
(R)
April 25, 2017
California 34 Xavier Becerra
(D)
Resigned January 24, 2017, to become Attorney General of California. [48]
A special election was held June 6, 2017. [49]
Jimmy Gomez
(D)
July 11, 2017
Georgia 6 Tom Price
(R)
Resigned February 10, 2017, to become U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services. [50]
A special election was held June 20, 2017. [51]
Karen Handel
(R)
June 26, 2017
South Carolina 5 Mick Mulvaney
(R)
Resigned February 16, 2017, to become Director of the Office of Management and Budget. [52]
A special election was held June 20, 2017. [53]
Ralph Norman
(R)
June 26, 2017
Montana at-large Ryan Zinke
(R)
Resigned March 1, 2017, to become U.S. Secretary of the Interior. [52]
A special election was held May 25, 2017. [54]
Greg Gianforte
(R)
June 21, 2017
Utah 3 Jason Chaffetz
(R)
Resigned June 30, 2017, for health reasons. [55]
A special election was held November 7, 2017. [56]
John Curtis
(R)
November 13, 2017
Pennsylvania 18 Tim Murphy
(R)
Resigned October 21, 2017. [57]
A special election was held March 13, 2018. [58]
Conor Lamb
(D)
April 12, 2018
Michigan 13 John Conyers
(D)
Resigned December 5, 2017. [59]
A special election was held November 6, 2018. [60]
Brenda Jones
(D) [61]
November 29, 2018
Arizona 8 Trent Franks
(R)
Resigned December 8, 2017. [62]
A special election was held April 24, 2018. [63]
Debbie Lesko
(R)
May 7, 2018
Ohio 12 Pat Tiberi
(R)
Resigned January 15, 2018, to lead the Ohio Business Roundtable. [64] [65]
A special election was held August 7, 2018 [66]
Troy Balderson (R)September 5, 2018
New York 25 Louise Slaughter
(D)
Died March 16, 2018. [67]
A special election was held November 6, 2018. [68]
Joseph Morelle
(D)
November 13, 2018
Texas 27 Blake Farenthold
(R)
Resigned April 6, 2018. [22]
A special election was held June 30, 2018. [69]
Michael Cloud
(R)
July 10, 2018
Oklahoma 1 Jim Bridenstine
(R)
Resigned April 23, 2018, to become the Administrator of National Aeronautics and Space Administration. [70]
Successor was elected to the next term and, by Oklahoma law, was considered thereby "appointed" November 6, 2018 to finish the current term.[ citation needed ] There is debate about the legality of such an appointment, however.[ citation needed ]
Kevin Hern
(R)
November 13, 2018
Pennsylvania 7 Pat Meehan
(R)
Resigned April 27, 2018. [71]
A special election was held November 6, 2018. [72]
Mary Gay Scanlon
(D)
November 13, 2018
Pennsylvania 15 Charlie Dent
(R)
Resigned May 12, 2018. [73]
A special election was held November 6, 2018. [72]
Susan Wild
(D)
November 27, 2018 [74]
Florida 6 Ron DeSantis
(R)
Resigned September 10, 2018. [75]
Seat remained vacant until determined by general election.
Vacant until the next Congress
West Virginia 3 Evan Jenkins
(R)
Resigned September 30, 2018, to become justice of the Supreme Court of Appeals of West Virginia. [76]
Seat remained vacant until determined by general election.
New Mexico 1 Michelle Lujan Grisham
(D)
Resigned December 31, 2018, to become Governor of New Mexico.

Committees

Section contents: Senate, House, Joint

Listed alphabetically by chamber, including Chairman and Ranking Member.

Senate

CommitteeChairmanRanking Member
Agriculture, Nutrition and Forestry Pat Roberts (R-KS) Debbie Stabenow (D-MI)
Appropriations Richard Shelby (R-AL) Patrick Leahy (D-VT)
Armed Services John McCain (R-AZ), until August 25, 2018
Jim Inhofe (R-OK), from September 6, 2018
Acting from December 2017
Jack Reed (D-RI)
Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs Mike Crapo (R-ID) Sherrod Brown (D-OH)
Budget Mike Enzi (R-WY) Bernie Sanders (I-VT)
Commerce, Science and Transportation John Thune (R-SD) Bill Nelson (D-FL)
Energy and Natural Resources Lisa Murkowski (R-AK) Maria Cantwell (D-WA)
Environment and Public Works John Barrasso (R-WY) Tom Carper (D-DE)
Finance Orrin Hatch (R-UT) Ron Wyden (D-OR)
Foreign Relations Bob Corker (R-TN) Bob Menendez (D-NJ)
Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Lamar Alexander (R-TN) Patty Murray (D-WA)
Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Ron Johnson (R-WI) Claire McCaskill (D-MO)
Judiciary Chuck Grassley (R-IA) Dianne Feinstein (D-CA)
Rules and Administration Roy Blunt (R-MO) Amy Klobuchar (D-MN)
Small Business and Entrepreneurship Jim Risch (R-ID) Jeanne Shaheen (D-NH)
Veterans' Affairs Johnny Isakson (R-GA) Jon Tester (D-MT)
Aging (Special) Susan Collins (R-ME) Bob Casey Jr. (D-PA)
Ethics (Select) Johnny Isakson (R-GA) Chris Coons (D-DE)
Indian Affairs (Permanent Select) John Hoeven (R-ND) Tom Udall (D-NM)
Intelligence (Select) Richard Burr (R-NC) Mark Warner (D-VA)
International Narcotics Control (Permanent Caucus) Chuck Grassley (R-IA) Dianne Feinstein (D-CA)

House of Representatives

CommitteeChairman [77] Ranking Member
Agriculture Mike Conaway (R-TX) Collin Peterson (D-MN)
Appropriations Rodney Frelinghuysen (R-NJ) Nita Lowey (D-NY)
Armed Services Mac Thornberry (R-TX) Adam Smith (D-WA)
Budget Diane Black (R-TN), until January 11, 2018
Acting until February 16, 2017
Steve Womack (R-AR), from January 11, 2018
John Yarmuth (D-KY)
Education and the Workforce Virginia Foxx (R-NC) Bobby Scott (D-VA)
Energy and Commerce Greg Walden (R-OR) Frank Pallone (D-NJ)
Ethics Susan Brooks (R-IN) Ted Deutch (D-FL)
Financial Services Jeb Hensarling (R-TX) Maxine Waters (D-CA)
Foreign Affairs Ed Royce (R-CA) Eliot Engel (D-NY)
Homeland Security Michael McCaul (R-TX) Bennie Thompson (D-MS)
House Administration Gregg Harper (R-MS) Bob Brady (D-PA)
Judiciary Bob Goodlatte (R-VA) John Conyers (D-MI), until November 26, 2017
Jerrold Nadler (D-NY), from November 26, 2017
Acting until December 20, 2017
Natural Resources Rob Bishop (R-UT) Raúl Grijalva (D-AZ)
Oversight and Government Reform Jason Chaffetz (R-UT), until June 13, 2017
Trey Gowdy (R-SC), from June 13, 2017
Elijah Cummings (D-MD)
Rules Pete Sessions (R-TX) Louise Slaughter (D-NY), until March 16, 2018
Jim McGovern (D-MA), from March 17, 2018
Acting until April 10, 2018
Science, Space and Technology Lamar Smith (R-TX) Eddie Bernice Johnson (D-TX)
Small Business Steve Chabot (R-OH) Nydia Velázquez (D-NY)
Transportation and Infrastructure Bill Shuster (R-PA) Peter DeFazio (D-OR)
Veterans' Affairs Phil Roe (R-TN) Tim Walz (D-MN)
Ways and Means Kevin Brady (R-TX) Richard Neal (D-MA)
Human Rights (Lantos Commission) Randy Hultgren (R-IL) Jim McGovern (D-MA)
Intelligence (Permanent Select) Devin Nunes (R-CA) Adam Schiff (D-CA)

Joint

CommitteeChairmanRanking Member
Economic Rep. Pat Tiberi (R-OH), until January 11, 2018
Rep. Erik Paulsen (R-MN), from January 11, 2018
Sen. Martin Heinrich (D-NM)
Library Sen. Roy Blunt (R-MO)Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-MN)
Printing Sen. Richard Shelby (R-AL)Rep. Bob Brady (D-PA)
Taxation Rep. Kevin Brady (R-TX)Sen. Ron Wyden (D-OR)
Budget and Appropriations Process Reform (Select) Rep. Steve Womack (R-AR) (co-chair)
Rep. Nita Lowey (D-NY) (co-chair)
Sen. Roy Blunt (R-MO)
Inaugural Ceremonies (Special) Sen. Roy Blunt (R-MO)Rep. Nancy Pelosi (D-CA)
Security and Cooperation in Europe (Helsinki Commission) Sen. Roger Wicker (R-MS)Rep. Alcee Hastings (D-FL)
Solvency of Multiemployer Pension Plans (Select) Sen. Orrin Hatch (R-UT) (co-chair)
Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-OH) (co-chair)
Rep. Virginia Foxx (R-NC)

Employees and legislative agency directors

Senate

House of Representatives

Legislative branch agency directors

See also

Notes

  1. 1 2 3 In Alabama, Senator Jeff Sessions (R) resigned February 8, 2017. Luther Strange (R) was appointed February 9, 2017, to continue the term. Doug Jones (D) was elected to finish the term and qualified January 3, 2018.
  2. 1 2 In Minnesota, Senator Al Franken (D) resigned January 2, 2018. Tina Smith (D) was appointed January 3, 2018, to continue the term.
  3. 1 2 In Mississippi, Senator Thad Cochran (R) resigned April 1, 2018. Cindy Hyde-Smith (R) was appointed April 2, 2018, to continue the term.
  4. 1 2 3 In Arizona, Senator John McCain (R) died August 25, 2018. Jon Kyl (R) was appointed September 4, 2018, to continue the term. Kyl announced his resignation, effective December 31, 2018. [27]
  5. 1 2 In Kansas's 4th district : Mike Pompeo (R) resigned January 23, 2017, and Ron Estes (R) was elected April 11, 2017.
  6. 1 2 In California's 34th district : Xavier Becerra (D) resigned January 24, 2017, and Jimmy Gomez (D) was elected June 6, 2017.
  7. 1 2 In Georgia's 6th district : Tom Price (R) resigned February 10, 2017, and Karen Handel (R) was elected June 20, 2017.
  8. 1 2 In South Carolina's 5th district : Mick Mulvaney (R) resigned February 16, 2017, and Ralph Norman (R) was elected June 20, 2017.
  9. 1 2 In Montana's at-large district : Ryan Zinke (R) resigned March 1, 2017, and Greg Gianforte (R) was elected May 25, 2017.
  10. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Service begins on the day of a special election, when qualified, not necessarily upon the oath of office.
  11. 1 2 In Utah's 3rd district : Jason Chaffetz (R) resigned June 30, 2017, and John Curtis (R) was elected November 7, 2017.
  12. 1 2 In Pennsylvania's 18th district : Tim Murphy (R) resigned October 21, 2017, and Conor Lamb (D) was elected March 13, 2018.
  13. 1 2 In Michigan's 13th district : Rep. John Conyers (D) resigned December 5, 2017, and Brenda Jones (D) was elected November 6, 2018.
  14. 1 2 In Arizona's 8th district : Trent Franks (R) resigned December 8, 2017, and Debbie Lesko (R) was elected April 24, 2018.
  15. 1 2 In Ohio's 12th district : Pat Tiberi (R) resigned January 15, 2018, and Troy Balderson (R) was elected August 7, 2018, although the results weren't final until August 24, 2018.
  16. 1 2 In New York's 25th district : Louise Slaughter (D) died March 16, 2018, and Joseph D. Morelle (D) was elected November 6, 2018.
  17. 1 2 In Texas's 27th district : Blake Farenthold (R) resigned April 6, 2018, and Michael Cloud (R) was elected June 30, 2018.
  18. 1 2 In Oklahoma's 1st district : Jim Bridenstine (R) resigned April 23, 2018, and Kevin Hern (R) was elected November 6, 2018.
  19. 1 2 In Pennsylvania's 7th district : Pat Meehan (R) resigned April 27, 2018, and Mary Gay Scanlon (D) was elected November 6, 2018.
  20. 1 2 In Pennsylvania's 15th district : Charlie Dent (R) resigned May 12, 2018 and Susan Wild (D) was elected November 6, 2018.
  21. In Florida's 6th district : Ron DeSantis (R) resigned September 10, 2018.
  22. In West Virginia's 3rd district : Evan Jenkins (R) resigned September 30, 2018.
  23. In New Mexico's 1st district : Michelle Lujan Grisham (D) resigned December 31, 2018.
  24. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 The Minnesota Democratic–Farmer–Labor Party (DFL) and the North Dakota Democratic-Nonpartisan League Party (D-NPL) are the Minnesota and North Dakota affiliates of the U.S. Democratic Party and are counted as Democrats.
  25. In Ohio's 12th congressional district , the special election on August 7, 2018, was so close that it wasn't settled until August 24, 2018.
  26. 1 2 This is the date the member was seated or an oath administered, not necessarily the same date her/his service began.

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The Ninety-first United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, composed of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. It met in Washington, DC from January 3, 1969, to January 3, 1971, during the first two years of the first administration of U.S. President Richard Nixon.

90th United States Congress 1967–1969 U.S. Congress

The ninetieth United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, composed of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. It met in Washington, D.C., from January 3, 1967, to January 3, 1969, during the last two years of the second administration of U.S. President Lyndon B. Johnson.

87th United States Congress 1961–1963 U.S. Congress

The Eighty-seventh United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, composed of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. It met in Washington, D.C. from January 3, 1961, to January 3, 1963, during the final weeks of the administration of U.S. President Dwight D. Eisenhower and the first two years of the administration of U.S. President John Kennedy. The apportionment of seats in the House of Representatives was based on the Seventeenth Census of the United States in 1950, along with 2 seats temporarily added in 1959. Both chambers had a Democratic majority.

69th United States Congress

The Sixty-ninth United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, consisting of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. It met in Washington, D.C. from March 4, 1925, to March 4, 1927, during the third and fourth years of Calvin Coolidge's presidency. The apportionment of seats in the House of Representatives was based on the Thirteenth Decennial Census of the United States in 1910. Both chambers had a Republican majority.

89th United States Congress 1965–1967 U.S. Congress

The Eighty-ninth United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, composed of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. It met in Washington, DC from January 3, 1965, to January 3, 1967, during the third and fourth years of Lyndon B. Johnson's presidency. The apportionment of seats in the House of Representatives was based on the Eighteenth Census of the United States in 1960. Both chambers had a Democratic supermajority. It is regarded as "arguably the most productive in American history". Some of its landmark legislation includes Social Security Amendments of 1965, the Voting Rights Act, Higher Education Act, and Freedom of Information Act.

68th United States Congress

The Sixty-eighth United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, consisting of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. It met in Washington, D.C. from March 4, 1923, to March 4, 1925, during the last months of Warren G. Harding's presidency, and the first years of the administration of his successor, Calvin Coolidge. The apportionment of seats in the House of Representatives was based on the Thirteenth Decennial Census of the United States in 1910. Both chambers had a Republican majority.

Texass 27th congressional district

Texas District 27 of the United States House of Representatives is a Congressional district that serves the coastal bend of Texas' Gulf Coast consisting of Corpus Christi and Victoria up to Bastrop County near Austin and Wharton County near Houston. Its current Representative is Republican Michael Cloud. Cloud was elected to the district in a special election on June 30, 2018, to replace former Republican Representative Blake Farenthold, who had resigned on April 6.

79th United States Congress 1945–1947 U.S. Congress

The Seventy-ninth United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, composed of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. It met in Washington, DC from January 3, 1945, to January 3, 1947, during the last months of Franklin D. Roosevelt's presidency, and the first two years of Harry Truman's presidency. The apportionment of seats in this House of Representatives was based on the Sixteenth Census of the United States in 1940. Both chambers had a Democratic majority.

86th United States Congress 1959–1961 U.S. Congress

The Eighty-sixth United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, composed of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. It met in Washington, D.C. from January 3, 1959, to January 3, 1961, during the last two years of the presidency of Dwight D. Eisenhower. The apportionment of seats in the House of Representatives was based on the Seventeenth Census of the United States in 1950. Both chambers had a Democratic majority. When Alaska and Hawaii were admitted as states in 1959, the membership of the House temporarily increased to 437 ; it would remain at 437 until reapportionment resulting from the 1960 census.

111th United States Congress 2009–2011 legislature of the United States

The One Hundred Eleventh United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government from January 3, 2009, until January 3, 2011. It began during the last two weeks of the George W. Bush administration, with the remainder spanning the first two years of Barack Obama's presidency. It was composed of the Senate and the House of Representatives. The apportionment of seats in the House was based on the 2000 U.S. Census. In the November 4, 2008 elections, the Democratic Party increased its majorities in both chambers, giving President Obama a Democratic majority in the legislature for the first two years of his presidency. A new delegate seat was created for the Northern Mariana Islands. The 111th Congress had the most experienced members in history: at the start of the 111th Congress, the average member of the House had served 10.3 years, while the average Senator had served 13.4 years.

112th United States Congress legislative term

The One Hundred Twelfth United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, from January 3, 2011, until January 3, 2013. It convened in Washington, D.C. on January 3, 2011, and ended on January 3, 2013, 17 days before the end of the presidential term to which Barack Obama was elected in 2008. Senators elected to regular terms in 2006 completed those terms in this Congress. This Congress included the last House of Representatives elected from congressional districts that were apportioned based on the 2000 census.

113th United States Congress 2013–2015 legislative term

The One Hundred Thirteenth United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, from January 3, 2013, to January 3, 2015, during the fifth and sixth years of Barack Obama's presidency. It was composed of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives based on the results of the 2012 Senate elections and the 2012 House elections. The seats in the House were apportioned based on the 2010 United States Census. It first met in Washington, D.C. on January 3, 2013, and it ended on January 3, 2015. Senators elected to regular terms in 2008 were in the last two years of those terms during this Congress.

114th United States Congress 2015–2017 legislative term

The One Hundred Fourteenth United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, composed of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. It met in Washington, D.C. from January 3, 2015, to January 3, 2017, during the final two full years of Barack Obama's presidency. The 2014 elections gave the Republicans control of the Senate for the first time since the 109th Congress. With 248 seats in the House of Representatives and 54 seats in the Senate, this Congress began with the largest Republican majority since the 71st Congress of 1929–1931.

116th United States Congress 116th Congress of the United States

The 116th United States Congress is the current meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, composed of the Senate and the House of Representatives. It convened in Washington, D.C. on January 3, 2019 and will end on January 3, 2021, during the third and fourth years of Donald Trump's presidency. Senators elected to regular terms in 2014 are finishing their terms in this Congress and House seats were apportioned based on the 2010 Census.

Michael Cloud

Michael Jonathan Cloud is an American politician currently serving as a member of the United States House of Representatives for Texas's 27th congressional district. He is a member of the Republican Party.

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