69th United States Congress

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69th United States Congress
68th  
  70th
USCapitol1906.jpg
March 4, 1925 – March 4, 1927
Senate President Charles G. Dawes (R)
Senate President pro tem George H. Moses (R)
House Speaker Nicholas Longworth (R)
Members96 senators
435 members of the House
5 non-voting delegates
Senate Majority Republican
House Majority Republican
Sessions
Special: March 4, 1925 – March 18, 1925
1st: December 7, 1925 – July 3, 1926
2nd: December 6, 1926 – March 3, 1927

The Sixty-ninth United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, consisting of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. It met in Washington, D.C. from March 4, 1925, to March 4, 1927, during the third and fourth years of Calvin Coolidge's presidency. The apportionment of seats in the House of Representatives was based on the Thirteenth Decennial Census of the United States in 1910. Both chambers had a Republican majority.

United States Senate Upper house of the United States Congress

The United States Senate is the upper chamber of the United States Congress, which along with the United States House of Representatives—the lower chamber—comprises the legislature of the United States. The Senate chamber is located in the north wing of the Capitol Building, in Washington, D.C.

United States House of Representatives lower house of the United States Congress

The United States House of Representatives is the lower house of the United States Congress, the Senate being the upper house. Together they compose the national legislature of the United States.

Washington, D.C. Capital of the United States

Washington, D.C., formally the District of Columbia and commonly referred to as Washington or D.C., is the capital of the United States. Founded after the American Revolution as the seat of government of the newly independent country, Washington was named after George Washington, the first President of the United States and a Founding Father. As the seat of the United States federal government and several international organizations, Washington is an important world political capital. The city is also one of the most visited cities in the world, with more than 20 million tourists annually.

Contents

Major events

A special session of the Senate was called by President Coolidge on February 14, 1925.

George W. English United States federal judge

George Washington English was a United States District Judge of the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Illinois.

United States District Court for the Eastern District of Illinois

The United States District Court for the Eastern District of Illinois is a former federal district court for the state of Illinois. The court was established on March 3, 1905, by 33 Stat. 992. The Northern and Southern Districts had been established on February 13, 1855. The statute establishing the Eastern District specified the counties to be included in that District as follows:

McGrain v. Daugherty, 273 U.S. 135 (1927), was a case heard before the Supreme Court, decided January 17, 1927. It was a challenge to Mally Daugherty's contempt conviction and arrest, which happened when he failed to appear before a Senate committee investigating Attorney General Harry Daugherty's failure to investigate the perpetrators of the Teapot Dome Scandal. The Court upheld his conviction.

Major legislation

Representative Edith Nourse Rogers of Massachusetts presiding over the House Chamber in 1926 Homefeature-rogers.jpg
Representative Edith Nourse Rogers of Massachusetts presiding over the House Chamber in 1926
Revenue Act of 1926

The United States Revenue Act of 1926, 44 Stat. 9, reduced inheritance and personal income taxes, cancelled many excise imposts, eliminated the gift tax and ended public access to federal income tax returns.

The Railway Labor Act is a United States federal law on US labor law that governs labor relations in the railroad and airline industries. The Act, passed in 1926 and amended in 1934 and 1936, seeks to substitute bargaining, arbitration and mediation for strikes to resolve labor disputes. Its provisions were originally enforced under the Board of Mediation, but they were later enforced under a National Mediation Board.

Shenandoah National Park national park of the United States

Shenandoah National Park is a national park that encompasses part of the Blue Ridge Mountains in the U.S. state of Virginia. The park is long and narrow, with the broad Shenandoah River and Valley on the west side, and the rolling hills of the Virginia Piedmont on the east. Although the scenic Skyline Drive is likely the most prominent feature of the park, almost 40% of the land area 79,579 acres has been designated as wilderness and is protected as part of the National Wilderness Preservation System. The highest peak is Hawksbill Mountain at 4,051 feet (1,235 m).

Party summary

Senate composition, by party 69th US Senate composition.png
Senate composition, by party

The count below identifies party affiliations at the beginning of the first session of this Congress, and includes members from vacancies and newly admitted states, when they were first seated. Changes resulting from subsequent replacements are shown below in the "Changes in membership" section.

Senate

Party
(shading shows control)
TotalVacant
Democratic
(D)
Farmer–Labor
(FL)
Republican
(R)
End of the previous congress 42 2 52 960
Begin 40 1 55 96 0
End 42 53
Final voting share43.8% 1.0% 55.2%
Beginning of the next congress 47 1 46 942

House of Representatives

American Labor Party former U.S. political party, 1936–1956

The American Labor Party (ALP) was a political party in the United States established in 1936 which was active almost exclusively in the state of New York. The organization was founded by labor leaders and former members of the Socialist Party of America who had established themselves as the Social Democratic Federation (SDF). The party was intended to parallel the role of the British Labour Party, serving as an umbrella organization to unite New York social democrats of the SDF with trade unionists who would otherwise support candidates of the Republican and Democratic parties.

Democratic Party (United States) Major political party in the United States

The Democratic Party is one of the two major contemporary political parties in the United States, along with its rival, the Republican Party. Tracing its heritage back to Thomas Jefferson and James Madison's Democratic-Republican Party, the modern-day Democratic Party was founded around 1828 by supporters of Andrew Jackson, making it the world's oldest active political party.

Republican Party (United States) Major political party in the United States

The Republican Party, also referred to as the GOP, is one of the two major political parties in the United States; the other is its historic rival, the Democratic Party.

TOTAL members: 435

Leadership

Senate

Senate Leadership
Chas G Dawes-H&E.jpg
Senate President
Charles G. Dawes (R)
Albert B Cummins.jpg
Senate President pro tempore
Albert B. Cummins (R), until March 6, 1925
GeorgeHMoses.jpg
Senate President pro tempore
George H. Moses (R), from March 6, 1925
Charles G. Dawes United States Army general

Charles Gates Dawes was an American banker, general, diplomat, and Republican politician who was the 30th vice president of the United States from 1925 to 1929. For his work on the Dawes Plan for World War I reparations, he was a co-recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize in 1925.

President pro tempore of the United States Senate second-highest-ranking official of the United States Senate

The President pro tempore of the United States Senate is the second-highest-ranking official of the United States Senate. Article One, Section Three of the United States Constitution provides that the Vice President of the United States is the President of the Senate, and mandates that the Senate must choose a President pro tempore to act in the Vice President's absence. Unlike the Vice President, the President pro tempore is an elected member of the Senate, able to speak or vote on any issue. Selected by the Senate at large, the President pro tempore has enjoyed many privileges and some limited powers. During the Vice President's absence, the President pro tempore is empowered to preside over Senate sessions. In practice, neither the Vice President nor the President pro tempore usually presides; instead, the duty of presiding officer is rotated among junior U.S. Senators of the majority party to give them experience in parliamentary procedure.

Albert B. Cummins American politician

Albert Baird Cummins, American lawyer and politician. He was the 18th Governor of Iowa elected to three consecutive terms and U.S. Senator for Iowa serving for 18 years.

Majority (Republican) leadership

Charles Curtis American politician, Vice-President of the United States from 1929–1933

Charles Curtis was an American attorney and politician, who served as the 31st vice president of the United States from 1929 to 1933.

Wesley Livsey Jones American politician

Wesley Livsey Jones was an American politician. He served in both the United States House of Representatives and the United States Senate representing the state of Washington.

James Wolcott Wadsworth Jr. U.S. Republican politician from New York

James Wolcott Wadsworth Jr. was a Republican politician from New York. He was the son of New York State Comptroller James Wolcott Wadsworth, and the grandson of Union General James S. Wadsworth.

Minority (Democratic) leadership

House of Representatives

House Leadership
Nick Longworth Portrait.JPG
House Speaker
Nicholas Longworth (R)

Majority (Republican) leadership

Minority (Democratic) leadership

Members

This list is arranged by chamber, then by state. Senators are listed by class, and Representatives by district.

Senate

Senators were elected every two years, with one-third beginning new six-year terms with each Congress. Preceding the names in the list below are Senate class numbers, which indicate the cycle of their election. In this Congress, Class 1 meant their term began in the last Congress, facing re-election in 1928; Class 2 meant their term began with this Congress, facing re-election in 1930; and Class 3 meant their term ended with this Congress, facing re-election in 1926.

House of Representatives

Changes in membership

The count below reflects changes from the beginning of the first session of this Congress.

Senate

StateSenatorReason for VacancySuccessorDate of Successor's Installation
Missouri
(3)
Selden P. Spencer (R)Died May 16, 1925. Successor was appointed. George H. Williams (R)May 25, 1925
Wisconsin
(1)
Robert M. La Follette Sr. (R)Died June 18, 1925. Successor was elected. Robert M. La Follette Jr. (R)September 30, 1925
North Dakota
(2)
Edwin F. Ladd (R)Died June 22, 1925. Successor was appointed and subsequently elected Gerald Nye (R)November 14, 1925
Indiana
(1)
Samuel M. Ralston (D)Died October 14, 1925. Successor was appointed and subsequently elected. Arthur R. Robinson (R)October 20, 1925
Iowa
(2)
Smith W. Brookhart (R)Lost election challenge April 12, 1926 Daniel F. Steck (D)April 12, 1926
Iowa
(3)
Albert B. Cummins (R)Died July 30, 1926.
Successor was appointed and subsequently elected.
David W. Stewart (R)August 7, 1926
Maine
(2)
Bert M. Fernald (R)Died August 23, 1926. Successor was elected. Arthur R. Gould (R)November 30, 1926
Massachusetts
(1)
William M. Butler (R)Appointed in previous Congress and served until successor was elected. David I. Walsh (D)December 6, 1926
Missouri
(3)
George H. Williams (R)Successor was elected. Harry B. Hawes (D)December 6, 1926
Illinois
(3)
William B. McKinley (R)Died December 7, 1926. Frank L. Smith was appointed by the governor some date in December 1926 [2] but the US Senate voted to not allow him to qualify as a senator, based upon fraud and corruption in his campaign.Vacant

House of Representatives

DistrictVacatorReason for VacancySuccessor
New Jersey 3rd VacantRep. T. Frank Appleby died during previous congress Stewart H. Appleby (R)November 3, 1925
Massachusetts 5th John J. Rogers (R)Died March 28, 1925 Edith Nourse Rogers (R)June 30, 1925
Michigan 3rd Arthur B. Williams (R)Died May 1, 1925 Joseph L. Hooper (R)August 18, 1925
Massachusetts 2nd George B. Churchill (R)Died July 1, 1925 Henry L. Bowles (R)September 29, 1925
Kentucky 3rd Robert Y. Thomas, Jr. (D)Died September 3, 1925 John W. Moore (D)December 26, 1925
California 2nd John E. Raker (D)Died January 22, 1926 Harry L. Englebright (R)August 31, 1926
Massachusetts 8th Harry I. Thayer (R)Died March 10, 1926 Frederick W. Dallinger (R)November 2, 1926
California 5th Lawrence J. Flaherty (R)Died June 13, 1926 Richard J. Welch (R)August 31, 1926
Illinois 12th Charles E. Fuller (R)Died June 25, 1926Seat remained vacant until next Congress
Kentucky 10th John W. Langley (R)Resigned January 11, 1926, after being convicted of illegally selling alcohol Andrew J. Kirk (R)February 13, 1926
Missouri 11th Harry B. Hawes (D)Resigned October 15, 1926 John J. Cochran (D)November 2, 1926
Ohio 2nd Ambrose E. B. Stephens (R)Died February 12, 1927Seat remained vacant until next Congress

Committees

Lists of committees and their party leaders, for members (House and Senate) of the committees and their assignments, go into the Official Congressional Directory at the bottom of the article and click on the link (4 links), in the directory after the pages of terms of service, you will see the committees of the Senate, House (Standing with Subcommittees, Select and Special) and Joint and after the committee pages, you will see the House/Senate committee assignments in the directory, on the committees section of the House and Senate in the Official Congressional Directory, the committee's members on the first row on the left side shows the chairman of the committee and on the right side shows the ranking member of the committee.

Senate

House of Representatives

Joint committees

Caucuses

Employees

Senate

House of Representatives

See also

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References

  1. Frank L. Smith (R-IL) was elected to the Senate for the term starting March 4, 1927, and when McKinley died he was appointed to finish McKinley's term. The Senate refused to qualify him due to charges of corruption concerning his election. He would later resign. See http://bioguide.congress.gov/scripts/biodisplay.pl?index=S000534.
  2. Exact date of Frank L. Smith's appointment to the Senate is unknown, but certainly between his predecessor's death on December 7, 1926, and the end of the term on March 4, 1927.[Data unknown/missing.]