114th United States Congress

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114th United States Congress
113th  
  115th
U.S. Capitol - March 28, 2016 (25666928564).jpg
U.S. Capitol (2016)
January 3, 2015 – January 3, 2017
Senate President Joe Biden (D)
Senate President pro tem Orrin Hatch (R)
House Speaker John Boehner (R)
until October 29, 2015
Paul Ryan (R)
from October 29, 2015
Members100 senators
435 members of the House
6 non-voting delegates
Senate Majority Republican
House Majority Republican
Sessions
1st: January 6, 2015 [1] – December 18, 2015 [2]
2nd: January 4, 2016 [2]  – January 3, 2017 [3]

The One Hundred Fourteenth United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, composed of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. It met in Washington, D.C. from January 3, 2015, to January 3, 2017, during the final two full years of Barack Obama's presidency. The 2014 elections gave the Republicans control of the Senate (and control of both houses of Congress) for the first time since the 109th Congress. With 248 seats in the House of Representatives and 54 seats in the Senate, this Congress began with the largest Republican majority since the 71st Congress of 1929–1931.

United States Federal republic in North America

The United States of America (USA), commonly known as the United States or America, is a country comprising 50 states, a federal district, five major self-governing territories, and various possessions. At 3.8 million square miles, the United States is the world's third or fourth largest country by total area and is slightly smaller than the entire continent of Europe's 3.9 million square miles. With a population of over 327 million people, the U.S. is the third most populous country. The capital is Washington, D.C., and the largest city by population is New York City. Forty-eight states and the capital's federal district are contiguous in North America between Canada and Mexico. The State of Alaska is in the northwest corner of North America, bordered by Canada to the east and across the Bering Strait from Russia to the west. The State of Hawaii is an archipelago in the mid-Pacific Ocean. The U.S. territories are scattered about the Pacific Ocean and the Caribbean Sea, stretching across nine official time zones. The extremely diverse geography, climate, and wildlife of the United States make it one of the world's 17 megadiverse countries.

United States Senate Upper house of the United States Congress

The United States Senate is the upper chamber of the United States Congress, which along with the United States House of Representatives—the lower chamber—comprises the legislature of the United States. The Senate chamber is located in the north wing of the Capitol Building, in Washington, D.C.

United States House of Representatives lower house of the United States Congress

The United States House of Representatives is the lower house of the United States Congress, the Senate being the upper house. Together they compose the national legislature of the United States.

Contents

Major events

President Barack Obama gave the State of the Union Address on January 20, 2015 President Obama delivers the State of the Union address Jan. 20, 2015.jpg
President Barack Obama gave the State of the Union Address on January 20, 2015
Prime Minister of Israel Benjamin Netanyahu addressed Congress on March 3, 2015 Benjamin netanyahu congress speech 2015.jpg
Prime Minister of Israel Benjamin Netanyahu addressed Congress on March 3, 2015
Secretary of State John Kerry, Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz, and Secretary of the Treasury Jack Lew defended the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action at a hearing of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee on July 23, 2015 John Kerry, Ernest Moniz and Jack Lew defending the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (19759429878).jpg
Secretary of State John Kerry, Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz, and Secretary of the Treasury Jack Lew defended the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action at a hearing of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee on July 23, 2015
Pope Francis addressed Congress September 24, 2015. Pope Francis Visits the United States Capitol (22153720701).jpg
Pope Francis addressed Congress September 24, 2015.
Speaker of the United States House of Representatives position

The speaker of the United States House of Representatives is the presiding officer of the United States House of Representatives. The office was established in 1789 by Article I, Section 2 of the U.S. Constitution. The speaker is the political and parliamentary leader of the House of Representatives, and is simultaneously the House's presiding officer, de facto leader of the body's majority party, and the institution's administrative head. Speakers also perform various other administrative and procedural functions. Given these several roles and responsibilities, the speaker usually does not personally preside over debates. That duty is instead delegated to members of the House from the majority party. Neither does the speaker regularly participate in floor debates.

John Boehner 53rd Speaker of the United States House of Representatives

John Andrew Boehner is an American politician who served as the 53rd speaker of the United States House of Representatives from 2011 to 2015. A member of the Republican Party, he was the U.S. Representative for Ohio's 8th congressional district from 1991 to 2015. The district included several rural and suburban areas near Cincinnati and Dayton.

2015 State of the Union Address

The 2015 State of the Union Address was given by the 44th United States President, Barack Obama, on Tuesday, January 20, 2015, in the chamber of the United States House of Representatives. Following recent tradition, Speaker of the House John Boehner sent a letter on December 19, 2014, formally inviting President Obama to speak. It was addressed to the 114th United States Congress. The State of the Union Address was broadcast on various television and radio stations and webcast from the White House. Webcasts were also provided by other sponsors, including a webcast from the U.S. Republican Party.

Major legislation

Enacted

An Act of Congress is a statute enacted by the United States Congress. It can either be a Public Law, relating to the general public, or a Private Law, relating to specific institutions or individuals.

Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015

Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015 (MACRA), commonly called the Permanent Doc Fix, is a United States statute. It changes the payment system for doctors who treat Medicare patients. It revises the Balanced Budget Act of 1997. It was the largest scale change to the American health care system following the Affordable Care Act ("ObamaCare") in 2010.

The Iran Nuclear Agreement Review Act of 2015 (INARA) is a bill that was passed by the US Congress in May 2015, giving Congress the right to review any agreement reached in the P5+1 talks with Iran aiming to prevent Iran from obtaining nuclear weapons.

Proposed

Vetoed

The National Labor Relations Board, an agency within the United States government, was created in 1935 as part of the National Labor Relations Act. Among the NLRB's chief responsibilities is the holding of elections to permit employees to vote whether they wish to be represented by a particular labor union. Congress amended the Act in 1947 through the Taft–Hartley Act to give workers the ability to decertify an already recognized or certified union as well. This article describes, in a very summary manner, the procedures that the NLRB uses to hold such elections, as well as the circumstances in which a union may obtain the right to represent a group of employees without an election.

National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 Vetoed legislation

The National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 is a United States purposed federal bill which specifies the budget and expenditures of the United States Department of Defense (DOD) for Fiscal Year 2016. The law authorizes the $515 billion in spending for national defense and an additional $89.2 billion for the Overseas Contingency Operations fund (OCO), for a total of $604.2 billion for the Fiscal Year 2016.

Clean Power Plan United States energy plan from President Obama

The Clean Power Plan was an Obama administration policy aimed at combating anthropogenic climate change that was first proposed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in June 2014. The final version of the plan was unveiled by President Obama on August 3, 2015. The 460-page rule titled "Carbon Pollution Emission Guidelines for Existing Stationary Sources: Electric Utility Generating Units" was published in the Federal Register on October 23, 2015. The Obama administration designed the plan to lower the carbon dioxide emitted by power generators. The plan was widely expected to be eliminated under President Donald Trump, who signed an executive order on March 28, 2017 mandating the EPA to review the plan. On June 1, 2017, the United States withdrew from the Paris Agreement.

Party summary

Resignations and new members are discussed in the "Changes in membership" section, below.

Senate

Final Senate Membership
44 Democrats 54 Republicans

2 Independents, caucusing with Democrats 114th United States Senate.svg
Final Senate Membership
     44 Democrats      54 Republicans
     2 Independents, caucusing with Democrats
AffiliationParty
(Shading indicates majority caucus)
TotalVacant
Democratic Independent Republican
End of previous Congress 532451000
Begin (January 3, 2015)442541000
Final voting share46.0%54.0% 
Beginning of the next Congress 462521000

House of Representatives

Final House Membership
187 Democrats 246 Republicans

2 Vacant 114thHouse.svg
Final House Membership
     187 Democrats      246 Republicans
     2 Vacant
Party
(Shading indicates majority caucus)
TotalVacant
Democratic Independent Republican
End of previous Congress 20102344350
Begin (January 3, 2015)18802474350
January 5, 2015 [lower-alpha 1] 2464341
February 6, 2015 [lower-alpha 2] 2454332
March 31, 2015 [lower-alpha 3] 2444323
May 5, 2015 [lower-alpha 1] 2454332
June 2, 2015 [lower-alpha 2] 2464341
September 10, 2015 [lower-alpha 3] 2474350
October 31, 2015 [lower-alpha 4] 2464341
June 7, 2016 [lower-alpha 4] 2474350
June 23, 2016 [lower-alpha 5] 1874341
July 20, 2016 [lower-alpha 6] 1864332
September 6, 2016 [lower-alpha 7] 2464323
November 8, 2016 [lower-alpha 5] [lower-alpha 6] [lower-alpha 7] 1882474350
December 4, 2016 [lower-alpha 8] 1874341
December 31, 2016 [lower-alpha 9] 2464332
Final voting share43.2%0.0%56.8%
Non-voting members 41160
Beginning of the next Congress 19402414350

Leadership

Section contents: Senate: Majority (R), Minority (D)House: Majority (R), Minority (D)

Senate

Senate President
Joe Biden 47th Vice President of the United States

Joseph Robinette Biden Jr. is an American politician who served as the 47th vice president of the United States from 2009 to 2017. Biden also represented Delaware in the U.S. Senate from 1973 to 2009. A member of the Democratic Party, Biden is a candidate for President in the 2020 election.

President pro tempore of the United States Senate second-highest-ranking official of the United States Senate

The President pro tempore of the United States Senate is the second-highest-ranking official of the United States Senate. Article One, Section Three of the United States Constitution provides that the Vice President of the United States is the President of the Senate, and mandates that the Senate must choose a President pro tempore to act in the Vice President's absence. Unlike the Vice President, the President pro tempore is an elected member of the Senate, able to speak or vote on any issue. Selected by the Senate at large, the President pro tempore has enjoyed many privileges and some limited powers. During the Vice President's absence, the President pro tempore is empowered to preside over Senate sessions. In practice, neither the Vice President nor the President pro tempore usually presides; instead, the duty of presiding officer is rotated among junior U.S. Senators of the majority party to give them experience in parliamentary procedure.

Orrin Hatch United States Senator from Utah

Orrin Grant Hatch is an American attorney, retired politician, and composer who served as a United States Senator from Utah for 42 years (1977–2019). He was the longest-serving Republican U.S. Senator in history and the longest-serving U.S. Senator from Utah in history.

Majority (Republican) leadership

Minority (Democratic) leadership

House of Representatives

House Speaker
John Boehner official portrait.jpg
John Boehner (R)
(until October 29, 2015)
Paul Ryan, 113th Congress.png
Paul Ryan (R)
(from October 29, 2015)

Majority (Republican) leadership

Minority (Democratic) leadership

Members

Senate

Senators are listed by state and then by Senate classes, In this Congress, Class 3 meant their term ended with this Congress, requiring re-election in 2016; Class 1 meant their term began in the last Congress, requiring re-election in 2018; and Class 2 meant their term began in this Congress, requiring re-election in 2020.

House of Representatives

Changes in membership

Senate

There were no changes in Senate membership during this Congress.

House of Representatives

DistrictVacatorReason for changeSuccessorDate of successor's
formal installation [lower-alpha 13]
New York 11th Michael Grimm
(R)
Incumbent resigned January 5, 2015, following a guilty plea on one count of felony tax evasion. [22]
A special election was held May 5, 2015. [23]
Dan Donovan
(R)
May 12, 2015
Mississippi 1st Alan Nunnelee
(R)
Incumbent died February 6, 2015. [24]
A special election runoff was held June 2, 2015. [25] [26]
Trent Kelly
(R)
June 9, 2015
Illinois 18th Aaron Schock
(R)
Incumbent resigned March 31, 2015, following a spending scandal. [27] [28]
A special election was held September 10, 2015.
Darin LaHood
(R)
September 17, 2015
Ohio 8th John Boehner
(R)
Incumbent resigned October 31, 2015. [29]
A special election was held June 7, 2016.
Warren Davidson
(R)
June 9, 2016 [30]
Pennsylvania 2nd Chaka Fattah
(D)
Incumbent resigned June 23, 2016, following a conviction of corruption charges. [31]
A special election was held November 8, 2016. [32]
Dwight Evans
(D)
November 14, 2016
Hawaii 1st Mark Takai
(D)
Incumbent died July 20, 2016. [33]
A special election was held November 8, 2016. [34]
Colleen Hanabusa
(D)
November 14, 2016
Kentucky 1st Ed Whitfield
(R)
Incumbent resigned September 6, 2016, following an ethics investigation. [35]
A special election was held November 8, 2016. [36]
James Comer
(R)
November 14, 2016
California 44th Janice Hahn
(D)
Incumbent resigned December 4, 2016, to become a member of the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors. [37]
No special election was held and the seat remained vacant until the next Congress. Hahn did not run for re-election in 2016.
Vacant until the next Congress
Michigan's 10th Candice Miller
(R)
Incumbent resigned December 31, 2016, to become Macomb County Public Works Commissioner. [38]
No special election was held and the seat remained vacant until the next Congress. Miller did not run for re-election in 2016.

Committees

[Section contents: Senate, House, Joint ] Listed alphabetically by chamber, including Chairman and Ranking Member.

Senate

CommitteeChairmanRanking Member
Agriculture, Nutrition and Forestry Pat Roberts (R-KS) Debbie Stabenow (D-MI)
Appropriations Thad Cochran (R-MS) Barbara Mikulski (D-MD)
Armed Services John McCain (R-AZ) Jack Reed (D-RI)
Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs Richard Shelby (R-AL) Sherrod Brown (D-OH)
Budget Mike Enzi (R-WY) Bernie Sanders (I-VT)
Commerce, Science and Transportation John Thune (R-SD) Bill Nelson (D-FL)
Energy and Natural Resources Lisa Murkowski (R-AK) Maria Cantwell (D-WA)
Environment and Public Works Jim Inhofe (R-OK) Barbara Boxer (D-CA)
Finance Orrin Hatch (R-UT) Ron Wyden (D-OR)
Foreign Relations Bob Corker (R-TN) Ben Cardin (D-MD)
Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Lamar Alexander (R-TN) Patty Murray (D-WA)
Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Ron Johnson (R-WI) Thomas Carper (D-DE)
Indian Affairs John Barrasso (R-WY) Jon Tester (D-MT)
Judiciary Chuck Grassley (R-IA) Patrick Leahy (D-VT)
Rules and Administration Roy Blunt (R-MO) Charles Schumer (D-NY)
Small Business and Entrepreneurship David Vitter (R-LA) Jeanne Shaheen (D-NH)
Veterans' Affairs Johnny Isakson (R-GA) Richard Blumenthal (D-CT)

House of Representatives

CommitteeChairmanRanking Member
Agriculture Michael Conaway (R-TX) Collin Peterson (D-MN)
Appropriations Harold Rogers (R-KY) Nita Lowey (D-NY)
Armed Services Mac Thornberry (R-TX) Adam Smith (D-WA)
Budget Tom Price (R-GA) Chris Van Hollen (D-MD)
Education and the Workforce John Kline (R-MN) Bobby Scott (D-VA)
Energy and Commerce Fred Upton (R-MI) Frank Pallone (D-NJ)
Ethics Charlie Dent (R-PA) Linda Sánchez (D-CA)
Financial Services Jeb Hensarling (R-TX) Maxine Waters (D-CA)
Foreign Affairs Edward Royce (R-CA) Eliot Engel (D-NY)
Homeland Security Michael McCaul (R-TX) Bennie Thompson (D-MS)
House Administration Candice Miller (R-MI) Robert Brady (D-PA)
Judiciary Bob Goodlatte (R-VA) John Conyers (D-MI)
Natural Resources Rob Bishop (R-UT) Raul Grijalva (D-AZ)
Oversight and Government Reform Jason Chaffetz (R-UT) Elijah Cummings (D-MD)
Rules Pete Sessions (R-TX) Louise Slaughter (D-NY)
Science, Space & Technology Lamar Smith (R-TX) Eddie Bernice Johnson (D-TX)
Small Business Steve Chabot (R-OH) Nydia Velázquez (D-NY)
Transportation and Infrastructure Bill Shuster (R-PA) Peter DeFazio (D-OR)
Veterans' Affairs Jeff Miller (R-FL) Corrine Brown (D-FL)
Ways and Means Kevin Brady (R-TX) Sander Levin (D-MI)
Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence Devin Nunes (R-CA) Adam Schiff (D-CA)

Joint committees

CommitteeChairmanVice Chairman
Joint Economic Committee Sen. Dan Coats (R-IN)Rep. Pat Tiberi (R-OH)
Joint Committee on Inaugural Ceremonies (Special) Sen. Roy Blunt (R-MO)Rep. Paul Ryan (R-WI)
Joint Committee on the Library Sen. Roy Blunt (R-MO)Rep. Gregg Harper (R-MS)
Joint Committee on Printing Rep. Gregg Harper (R-MS)Sen. Roy Blunt (R-MO)
Joint Committee on Taxation Rep. Kevin Brady (R-TX)Sen. Orrin Hatch (R-UT)

Caucuses

Employees and legislative agency directors

Senate

Source: "Senate Organization Chart for the 114th Congress". Senate.gov. US Senate. Archived from the original on March 28, 2015. Retrieved January 26, 2015.

House of Representatives

Source: "Officers and Organizations of the House". House.gov. US House. Retrieved January 26, 2015.

Legislative branch agency directors

See also

Notes

  1. 1 2 In New York's 11th district : Michael Grimm (R) resigned January 5, 2015 and Dan Donovan (R) was elected May 5, 2015.
  2. 1 2 In Mississippi's 1st district : Alan Nunnelee (R) died February 6, 2015 and Trent Kelly (R) was elected June 2, 2015.
  3. 1 2 In Illinois's 18th district : Aaron Schock (R) resigned March 31, 2015 and Darin Lahood (R) was elected September 10, 2015.
  4. 1 2 In Ohio's 8th district : John Boehner (R) resigned October 31, 2015 and Warren Davidson (R-) was elected June 7, 2016.
  5. 1 2 In Pennsylvania's 2nd district : Chaka Fattah (D) resigned June 23, 2016 and Dwight Evans (D) was elected November 8, 2016.
  6. 1 2 In Hawaii's 1st district : Mark Takai (D) died July 20, 2016 and Colleen Hanabusa (D) was elected November 8, 2016.
  7. 1 2 In Kentucky's 1st district : Ed Whitfield (R) resigned September 6, 2016 and James Comer (R) was elected November 8, 2016.
  8. In California's 44th district : Janice Hahn (D) resigned December 4, 2016.
  9. In Michigan's 10th district : Candice Miller (R) resigned December 31, 2016.
  10. 1 2 Senators King (ME) and Sanders (VT) had no political affiliation but caucused with the Democratic Party.
  11. Sablan caucuses with the Democratic Party. [21]
  12. Like many members of the PNP, Pedro Pierluisi affiliates with both the PNP and the Democratic Party.
  13. This is the date the member was seated or an oath administered, not necessarily the same date her/his service began.

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  2. 1 2 H.Con.Res. 104: "Providing for the sine die adjournment of the first session of the One Hundred Fourteenth Congress."
  3. House Calendar on January 3, 2017
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