Mike Turner

Last updated

*In 2002, Ronald Williamitis received 14 votes.

Mike Turner
Mike Turner, official photo, 116th Congress.jpg
Ranking Member of the House Intelligence Committee
Assumed office
January 1, 2022
Ohio's 10th congressional district : Results 2012–2020 [49] [50]
YearDemocratVotesPctIndependent/LibertarianVotesPctRepublicanVotesPct
2012 Sharen Neuhardt 13109737%David Harlow10,3733%Michael R. Turner208,20160%
2014 Robert Klepinger63,24932%David Harlow6,6053%Michael R. Turner130,75265%
2016 Robert Klepinger109,98133%Tom McMasters10,8903%Michael R. Turner215,72464%*
2018 Theresa A. Gasper118,78542%David Harlow5,3872%Michael R. Turner157,55456%
2020 Desiree Tims151,97642%Michael R. Turner212,97258%

*In 2016, David Harlow received 7 votes.

Controversies

Allegations of self-enrichment

In both 2008 and 2010 Turner was listed as one of the "most corrupt members of Congress" by the Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington for "enrichment of self, family, or friends" and "solicitation of gifts". [51] [52]

In 2006, a marketing firm owned by Turner's first wife, Lori, was hired without competitive bidding by the Dayton Development Coalition, an organization that lobbies for federal funds from congressmen such as Turner, to develop a regional rebranding campaign. She withdrew from the coalition in 2008, weeks after reports of the agreement surfaced that also revealed that her firm was compensated at least $300,000 to produce the slogan "Get Midwest". [18] [53] [54]

A 2008 report released by the Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington detailed $54,065 that Turner's election committee had paid to his wife's company between 2002 and 2006 based on public campaign finance disclosures. [55]

According to analysis conducted by the Dayton Daily News in 2016, [56] when Turner came to Congress in 2002, he claimed between $153,026 and $695,000 worth of assets on his financial disclosure form. In 2016, he claimed between $2.8 million and $10.3 million. The paper credited his second marriage to an energy lobbyist as a contributing reason for the increase, since her assets as well as his were listed on his 2016 financial disclosure form. Their relationship raised red flags [57] when Turner was accused of authoring natural gas legislation that might benefit her employer at the time, Cheniere Energy.

Absence of local town halls

At multiple times during his tenure in Congress, Turner has faced protests from constituents for refusing to host public town hall events, [58] [59] [60] [61] presumably over fear that the events would draw strong backlash from constituents over repeated efforts to repeal the Affordable Care Act that Republicans in neighboring districts [62] and around the country [63] [64] experienced.

Citizens Against Government Waste

At various times Turner has been criticized by fiscally conservative groups, such as the Citizens Against Government Waste, for siphoning federal taxpayer dollars to local line-item projects, specifically after obtaining $250,000 to a local theater in his district in Wilmington, Ohio, [65] and $4,000,000 for Open Source Research Centers intended for Radiance Technologies in Fairborn, Ohio. [66]

In April 2019, Citizens Against Government Waste named Turner the "Porker of the Month" [67] for leading the effort to "spend more taxpayer dollars on the most expensive weapons system in U.S. history", the F-35 program. This designation came in recognition for his continued support for expansion [68] of the program, which had already been in development for 17 years, was seven years behind schedule, and was nearly $200 billion over budget. [69] In March, Air Force Secretary Heather Wilson raised concerns [70] about the soaring expense, saying, "we just don’t think that there has been enough attention on the sustainment costs of the aircraft and driving them down." This criticism added to the existing House Armed Services Committee report [71] from 2018 stating that the F-35 "may not have the range it needs to strike enemy targets" and that "the Joint Strike Fighter initiative, the most expensive weapons program in history, may actually have been out of date years ago."

Sutorina dispute involvement

On March 3, 2015, Montenegrin, Bosnian, and other Balkan-based news agencies reported that Turner had involved himself in the Sutorina dispute between Bosnia and Montenegro, sending a letter of warning to Bosniak member of the Presidency of Bosnia and Herzegovina Bakir Izetbegovic in which he suggested that if Bosnia did not give up its territorial dispute over Sutorina the United States might suspend its aid to Bosnia. [72] [73]

Personal life

In 1987, Turner married Lori Turner, a health executive. They have two daughters. After 25 years of marriage, they announced their separation in 2012 [74] and divorced in 2013. Turner married Majida Mourad on December 19, 2015, at Westminster Presbyterian Church in downtown Dayton. [3] Representative Darrell Issa was a groomsman at the wedding. In May 2017, after less than two years of marriage, Turner filed for divorce from Mourad, alleging that Mourad "is guilty of a fraudulent contract". As part of the acrimonious divorce, Turner's lawyers wrote to Issa "stating they would like to depose" him, but lawyers for both sides later released a statement that "Majida Mourad and Congressman Michael Turner have come to a resolution". [4] [5]

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Political offices
Preceded by Mayor of Dayton
1994–2002
Succeeded by
U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Ohio's 3rd congressional district

2003–2013
Succeeded by
Preceded by Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Ohio's 10th congressional district

2013–present
Incumbent
Preceded by Ranking Member of the House Intelligence Committee
2022–present
Diplomatic posts
Preceded by President of the NATO Parliamentary Assembly
2014–2016
Succeeded by
U.S. order of precedence (ceremonial)
Preceded by United States representatives by seniority
68th
Succeeded by