Rob Portman

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Barone, Michael; Ujifusa, Grant (1993). The Almanac of American Politics, 1994. National Journal. Washington DC. ISBN   0-89234-058-4.
  • Barone, Michael; Ujifusa, Grant (1997). The Almanac of American Politics, 1998 . National Journal. Washington DC. ISBN   0-89234-080-0.
  • Michael Barone, Richard E. Cohen, and Grant Ujifusa. The Almanac of American Politics, 2002. Washington, D.C.: National Journal, 2001. ISBN   0-89234-099-1
  • "CQ Almanac 1993" . Congressional Quarterly Almanac, 49th Edition, 103rd Congress, 1st Session. Washington, D.C.: CQ Press. 1994. ISBN   1-56802-020-1.
  • "Politics in America, 1992: The 102nd Congress". Congressional Quarterly. Washington, D.C.: CQ Press. 1991. ISBN   0-87187-599-3.
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    175. "Don't Punish US Companies That Help End Abuses in the West Bank". Human Rights Watch . December 18, 2018.
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    Rob Portman
    Rob Portman official portrait.jpg
    Official portrait, 2018
    United States Senator
    from Ohio
    Assumed office
    January 3, 2011
    Servingwith Sherrod Brown
    Political offices
    Preceded by
    Gordon Wheeler
    White House Director of Legislative Affairs
    1989–1991
    Succeeded by
    Stephen Hart
    Preceded by United States Trade Representative
    2005–2006
    Succeeded by
    Preceded by Director of the Office of Management and Budget
    2006–2007
    Succeeded by
    U.S. House of Representatives
    Preceded by Member of the  U.S. House of Representatives
    from Ohio's 2nd congressional district

    1993–2005
    Succeeded by
    Party political offices
    Preceded by Republican nominee for U.S. Senator from Ohio
    (Class 3)

    2010, 2016
    Succeeded by
    U.S. Senate
    Preceded by U.S. senator (Class 3) from Ohio
    2011present
    Served alongside: Sherrod Brown
    Incumbent
    Preceded by Ranking Member of the Senate Homeland Security Committee
    2021–present
    Incumbent
    U.S. order of precedence (ceremonial)
    Preceded by Order of precedence of the United States
    as United States Senator
    Succeeded by
    Preceded by United States senators by seniority
    42nd
    Succeeded by