United States Secretary of Labor

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United States Secretary of Labor
USDOL Seal circa 2015.svg
Seal of the Department
Flag of the United States Secretary of Labor.svg
Flag of the Secretary
Eugene Scalia (cropped).jpg
Incumbent
Eugene Scalia

since September 30, 2019
United States Department of Labor
Style Mr. Secretary
Member of Cabinet
Reports to President of the United States
Seat Frances Perkins Building, Washington, D.C.
AppointerThe President
with Senate advice and consent
Term length No fixed term
Constituting instrument 29 U.S.C.   § 551
Precursor Secretary of Commerce and Labor
FormationMarch 4, 1913
First holder William B. Wilson
Succession Eleventh [1]
Deputy Deputy Secretary of Labor
Salary Executive Schedule, level I
Website www.dol.gov

The United States Secretary of Labor is a member of the Cabinet of the United States, and as the head of the United States Department of Labor, controls the department, and enforces and suggests laws involving unions, the workplace, and all other issues involving any form of business-person controversies.

Contents

Formerly, there was a U.S. Secretary of Commerce and Labor, who led this department along with the U.S. Department of Commerce as one department. Since the two departments split in 1913, the Department of Commerce is now headed by a separate U.S. Secretary of Commerce.

Eugene Scalia, a son of the late U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, has served as Secretary of Labor since September 30, 2019.

The former flag of the U.S. Secretary of Labor, used from 1915 to 1960. Flag of the United States Secretary of Labor (1915-1960).svg
The former flag of the U.S. Secretary of Labor, used from 1915 to 1960.

List of Secretaries of Labor

Parties

   Democratic (12)    Republican (16)

No.PortraitNameState of ResidenceTook officeLeft office President(s)
1 Wbwilson.jpg William B. Wilson Pennsylvania March 6, 1913March 4, 1921 Woodrow Wilson
2 Jjdavis.jpg James J. Davis Pennsylvania March 5, 1921November 30, 1930 Warren G. Harding
Calvin Coolidge
Herbert Hoover
3 Wndoak.jpg William N. Doak Virginia December 9, 1930March 4, 1933
4 Fcperkins.jpg Frances Perkins New York March 4, 1933June 30, 1945 Franklin D. Roosevelt
Harry S. Truman
5 Lbschwellenbach.jpg Lewis B. Schwellenbach Washington July 1, 1945June 10, 1948
6 Mjtobin.jpg Maurice J. Tobin Massachusetts August 13, 1948January 20, 1953
7 Mpdurkin.jpg Martin P. Durkin Maryland January 21, 1953September 10, 1953 Dwight D. Eisenhower
8 Jpmitchell.jpg James P. Mitchell New Jersey October 9, 1953January 20, 1961
9 Ajgoldberg.jpg Arthur Goldberg Illinois January 21, 1961September 20, 1962 John F. Kennedy
10 Wwwirtz.jpg W. Willard Wirtz Illinois September 25, 1962January 20, 1969
Lyndon B. Johnson
11 Shultz.jpg George P. Shultz Illinois January 22, 1969July 1, 1970 Richard Nixon
12 Jdhodgson.jpg James D. Hodgson California July 2, 1970February 1, 1973
13 Pjbrennan.jpg Peter J. Brennan New York February 2, 1973March 15, 1975
Gerald Ford
14 Jtdunlop.jpg John T. Dunlop Massachusetts March 18, 1975January 31, 1976
15 Wjusery.jpg William Usery Jr. Georgia February 10, 1976January 20, 1977
16 Frmarshall.jpg Ray Marshall Texas January 27, 1977January 20, 1981 Jimmy Carter
17 Rjdonovan.jpg Raymond J. Donovan New Jersey February 4, 1981March 15, 1985 Ronald Reagan
18 Williamebrock.jpg Bill Brock Tennessee April 29, 1985October 31, 1987
19 Admclaughl1.jpg Ann Dore McLaughlin District of Columbia December 17, 1987January 20, 1989
20 Edole1.jpg Elizabeth Dole Kansas January 25, 1989November 23, 1990 George H. W. Bush
21 Lmartin1.jpg Lynn M. Martin Illinois February 22, 1991January 20, 1993
22 Robert Reich.jpg Robert Reich Massachusetts January 22, 1993January 20, 1997 Bill Clinton
23 Alexis osec.jpg Alexis Herman Alabama May 1, 1997January 20, 2001
24 Elaine Chao large.jpg Elaine Chao Kentucky January 29, 2001January 20, 2009 George W. Bush
RadzelyHoward.jpg Howard Radzely Pennsylvania January 20, 2009February 2, 2009 Barack Obama
HuglerEdward.jpg Ed Hugler Pennsylvania February 2, 2009February 24, 2009
25 Hilda Solis official DOL portrait.jpg Hilda Solis California February 24, 2009January 22, 2013
Seth Harris DOL.jpg Seth Harris New York January 22, 2013July 23, 2013
26 Tom Perez (cropped).jpg Tom Perez Maryland July 23, 2013January 20, 2017
HuglerEdward.jpg Ed Hugler Pennsylvania January 20, 2017April 27, 2017 Donald Trump
27 Alexander Acosta official portrait (cropped).jpg Alexander Acosta Florida April 28, 2017July 19, 2019
Patrick Pizzella, acting secretary (cropped).jpg Patrick Pizzella Virginia July 20, 2019September 30, 2019
28 Eugene Scalia (cropped).jpg Eugene Scalia Virginia September 30, 2019Incumbent

Living former Secretaries of Labor

As of January 2020, there are thirteen living former Secretaries of Labor (with all Secretaries that have served since 1977 still living), the oldest being George P. Shultz (served 1969–1970, born 1920). The most recent Secretary of Labor to die was William Usery Jr. (served 1976–1977, born 1923), on December 10, 2016.

NameTerm of officeDate of birth (and age)
George P. Shultz 1969–1970December 13, 1920 (age 99)
Ray Marshall 1977–1981August 22, 1928 (age 91)
Raymond J. Donovan 1981–1985August 31, 1930 (age 89)
Bill Brock 1985–1987November 23, 1930 (age 89)
Ann Dore McLaughlin 1987–1989November 16, 1941 (age 78)
Elizabeth H. Dole 1989–1990July 29, 1936 (age 83)
Lynn Morley Martin 1991–1993December 26, 1939 (age 80)
Robert Reich 1993–1997June 24, 1946 (age 73)
Alexis Herman 1997–2001July 16, 1947 (age 72)
Elaine Chao 2001–2009March 26, 1953 (age 66)
Hilda Solis 2009–2013October 20, 1957 (age 62)
Thomas Perez 2013–2017October 7, 1961 (age 58)
Alexander Acosta 2017–2019January 16, 1969 (age 51)

Line of succession

The line of succession for the Secretary of Labor is as follows: [2]

  1. Deputy Secretary of Labor
  2. Solicitor of Labor
  3. Assistant Secretary for Administration and Management
  4. Assistant Secretary for Policy
  5. Assistant Secretary for Congressional and Intergovernmental Affairs
  6. Assistant Secretary for Employment and Training
  7. Assistant Secretary for Employee Benefits Security
  8. Assistant Secretary for Occupational Safety and Health
  9. Assistant Secretary for Mine Safety and Health
  10. Assistant Secretary for Public Affairs
  11. Chief Financial Officer
  12. Administrator, Wage and Hour Division
  13. Assistant Secretary for Veterans' Employment and Training
  14. Assistant Secretary for Disability Employment Policy
  15. Deputy Solicitor of Labor (First Assistant of the Solicitor of Labor)
  16. Deputy Assistant Secretary for Policy (First Assistant of the Assistant Secretary for Policy)
  17. Deputy Assistant Secretary for Congressional Affairs (First Assistant of the Assistant Secretary for Congressional and Intergovernmental Affairs)
  18. Deputy Assistant Secretary for Employment and Training (First Assistant of the Assistant Secretary for Employment and Training)
  19. Deputy Assistant Secretary for Policy (First Assistant of the Assistant Secretary for Employee Benefits Security)
  20. Deputy Assistant Secretary for Occupational Safety and Health (First Assistant of the Assistant Secretary for Occupational Safety and Health)
  21. Deputy Assistant Secretary for Mine Safety and Health (First Assistant of the Assistant Secretary for Mine Safety and Health)
  22. Regional Solicitor—Dallas
  23. Regional Administrator for the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Administration and Management—Region VI/Dallas

Designated Secretarial Designee

If none of the above officials are available to serve as Acting Secretary of Labor, the Designated Secretarial Designee assumes interim operational control over the Department, except the Secretary's non-delegable responsibilities.

  1. Director, Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs
  2. Director of the Women's Bureau
  3. Regional Administrator, Employment and Training Administration—Dallas
  4. Regional Administration, Occupational Safety and Health Administration—Dallas

See also

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References

  1. 3 U.S.C.   § 19, Vacancy in offices of both President and Vice President; officers eligible to act
  2. "Order of Succession to the Secretary of Labor in Periods of Vacancy, Continuity of Executive Direction, Repositioning and Devolution of Departmental Governance, and Emergency Planning Under Circumstances of Extreme Disruption". Federal Register. January 19, 2017. Retrieved June 2, 2017.
U.S. order of precedence (ceremonial)
Preceded by
Wilbur Ross
as Secretary of Commerce
Order of Precedence of the United States
as Secretary of Labor
Succeeded by
Alex Azar
as Secretary of Health and Human Services
U.S. presidential line of succession
Preceded by
Secretary of Commerce
Wilbur Ross
11th in lineSucceeded by
Secretary of Health and Human Services
Alex Azar