Title 5 of the United States Code

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Title 5 of the United States Code is a positive law title of the United States Code with the heading "Government Organization And Employees." [1]

Contents

Provisions

Title 5 contains the Freedom of Information Act, Privacy Act of 1974, the Congressional Review Act as well as authorization for government reorganizations such as Reorganization Plan No. 3. It also is the Title that specifies Federal holidays (5 U.S.C.   § 6103).

In addition, there is an appendix to Title 5 but it is not itself considered positive law. It contains reorganization plans and the Inspector General Act of 1978, as well as other laws. [2]

History

On September 6, 1966, Title 5 was enacted as positive law by Pub. L. 89–554 (80  Stat.   378). Prior to the 1966 positive law recodification, Title 5 had the heading, "Executive Departments and Government Officers and Employees." [3]

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References

  1. "United States Code". Office of the Law Revision Counsel . Retrieved November 21, 2015.
  2. "United States Code". Office of the Law Revision Counsel . Retrieved April 19, 2020.
  3. United States Code (1964). Washington, DC: U.S. House Committee on the Judiciary. 1965. p. 111.