103rd United States Congress

Last updated

103rd United States Congress
102nd  
  104th
USCapitol.jpg
January 3, 1993 – January 3, 1995
Senate President Dan Quayle (R),
until January 20, 1993
Al Gore (D),
from January 20, 1993
Senate President pro tem Robert Byrd (D)
House Speaker Tom Foley (D)
Members100 senators
435 members of the House
5 non-voting delegates
Senate Majority Democratic
House Majority Democratic
Sessions
1st: January 5, 1993 – November 26, 1993
2nd: January 25, 1994 – December 1, 1994

The One Hundred Third United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, composed of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. It met in Washington, D.C. from January 3, 1993, to January 3, 1995, during the final weeks of George H. W. Bush's presidency and the first two years of Bill Clinton's presidency. The apportionment of seats in the House of Representatives was based on the Twenty-first Census of the United States in 1990. Both chambers had a Democratic majority. This is the last Congress which the Democratic Party had both house majorities in the 20th Century.

United States Senate Upper house of the United States Congress

The United States Senate is the upper chamber of the United States Congress which, along with the United States House of Representatives—the lower chamber—comprises the legislature of the United States. The Senate chamber is located in the north wing of the Capitol Building, in Washington, D.C.

United States House of Representatives Lower house of the United States Congress

The United States House of Representatives is the lower house of the United States Congress, the Senate being the upper house. Together they compose the national legislature of the United States.

Washington, D.C. Capital of the United States

Washington, D.C., formally the District of Columbia and commonly referred to as Washington or D.C., is the capital of the United States. Founded after the American Revolution as the seat of government of the newly independent country, Washington was named after George Washington, the first president of the United States and a Founding Father. As the seat of the United States federal government and several international organizations, Washington is an important world political capital. The city, located on the Potomac River bordering Maryland and Virginia, is one of the most visited cities in the world, with more than 20 million tourists annually.

Contents

Major events

Bill Clinton 42nd president of the United States

William Jefferson Clinton is an American politician who served as the 42nd president of the United States from 1993 to 2001. Prior to the presidency, he was the governor of Arkansas from 1979 to 1981, and again from 1983 to 1992, and the attorney general of Arkansas from 1977 to 1979. A member of the Democratic Party, Clinton was ideologically a New Democrat, and many of his policies reflected a centrist "Third Way" political philosophy.

President of the United States Head of state and of government of the United States

The president of the United States (POTUS) is the head of state and head of government of the United States of America. The president directs the executive branch of the federal government and is the commander-in-chief of the United States Armed Forces.

New York City Largest city in the United States

The City of New York, usually called either New York City (NYC) or simply New York (NY), is the most populous city in the United States. With an estimated 2018 population of 8,398,748 distributed over a land area of about 302.6 square miles (784 km2), New York is also the most densely populated major city in the United States. Located at the southern tip of the state of New York, the city is the center of the New York metropolitan area, the largest metropolitan area in the world by urban landmass and one of the world's most populous megacities, with an estimated 19,979,477 people in its 2018 Metropolitan Statistical Area and 22,679,948 residents in its Combined Statistical Area. A global power city, New York City has been described as the cultural, financial, and media capital of the world, and exerts a significant impact upon commerce, entertainment, research, technology, education, politics, tourism, art, fashion, and sports. The city's fast pace has inspired the term New York minute. Home to the headquarters of the United Nations, New York is an important center for international diplomacy.

Major legislation

An Act of Congress is a statute enacted by the United States Congress. It can either be a Public Law, relating to the general public, or a Private Law, relating to specific institutions or individuals.

<i>United States Statutes at Large</i>

The United States Statutes at Large, commonly referred to as the Statutes at Large and abbreviated Stat., are an official record of Acts of Congress and concurrent resolutions passed by the United States Congress. Each act and resolution of Congress is originally published as a slip law, which is classified as either public law or private law (Pvt.L.), and designated and numbered accordingly. At the end of a Congressional session, the statutes enacted during that session are compiled into bound books, known as "session law" publications. The session law publication for U.S. Federal statutes is called the United States Statutes at Large. In that publication, the public laws and private laws are numbered and organized in chronological order. U.S. Federal statutes are published in a three-part process, consisting of slip laws, session laws, and codification.

National Voter Registration Act of 1993

The National Voter Registration Act of 1993 (NVRA), also known as the Motor Voter Act, is a United States federal law signed into law by President Bill Clinton on May 20, 1993, and which came into effect on January 1, 1995. The law was enacted under the Elections Clause of the United States Constitution. The law advances voting rights in the United States by requiring state governments to offer voter registration opportunities to any eligible person who applies for or renews a driver's license or applies for public assistance along with requiring the United States Postal Service to mail election materials of a state as if the state is a nonprofit. The law requires states to register applicants that use a federal voter registration form to apply and prohibits states from removing registered voters from the voter rolls unless certain criteria are met.

Party summary

Senate

Senate party standings on the opening day of Congress
57 Democratic Senators
43 Republican Senators 103senate.svg
Senate party standings on the opening day of Congress
  57 Democratic Senators
  43 Republican Senators
Party
(shading shows control)
TotalVacant
Democratic
(D)
Republican
(R)
End of previous congress 58 421000
Begin 57 43 100 0
End 53 47
Final voting share53.0% 47.0%
Beginning of next congress 47 531000

House of Representatives

House seats by party holding plurality in state
80.1-100% Democratic
80.1-100% Republican
60.1-80% Democratic
60.1-80% Republican
50.1-60% Democratic
50.1-60% Republican
striped: 50-50 split
1 independent 103 us house membership.png
House seats by party holding plurality in state
  80.1–100% Democratic
  80.1–100% Republican
  60.1–80% Democratic
  60.1–80% Republican
  50.1–60% Democratic
  50.1–60% Republican
  striped: 50–50 split
  1 independent
Party
(Shading indicates majority caucus)
Total
Democratic Independent Republican Vacant
End of the previous Congress 26711664341
Begin25811764350
End2561774341
Final voting share59.2%40.8%
Non-voting members40050
Beginning of the next Congress 20412304350

Leadership

Senate

Senate President
Dan Quayle crop.jpg
Dan Quayle (R)
(until January 20, 1993)
Al Gore, Vice President of the United States, official portrait 1994.jpg
Al Gore (D)
(from January 20, 1993)
Senate President pro tempore
Dan Quayle 44th vice president of the United States

James Danforth Quayle is an American politician and lawyer who served as the 44th vice president of the United States from 1989 to 1993. Quayle was also a U.S. representative from 1977 to 1981 and a U.S. senator from 1981 to 1989 for the state of Indiana.

Al Gore 45th Vice President of the United States

Albert Arnold Gore Jr. is an American politician and environmentalist who served as the 45th vice president of the United States from 1993 to 2001. Gore was Bill Clinton's running mate in their successful campaign in 1992, and the pair was re-elected in 1996. Near the end of Clinton's second term, Gore was selected as the Democratic nominee for the 2000 presidential election but lost the election in a very close race after a Florida recount. After his term as vice-president ended in 2001, Gore remained prominent as an author and environmental activist, whose work in climate change activism earned him the Nobel Peace Prize in 2007.

President pro tempore of the United States Senate second-highest-ranking official of the United States Senate

The president pro tempore of the United States Senate is the second-highest-ranking official of the United States Senate. Article One, Section Three of the United States Constitution provides that the vice president of the United States is the president of the Senate, and mandates that the Senate must choose a president pro tempore to act in the vice president's absence. Unlike the vice president, the president pro tempore is an elected member of the Senate, able to speak or vote on any issue. Selected by the Senate at large, the president pro tempore has enjoyed many privileges and some limited powers. During the vice president's absence, the president pro tempore is empowered to preside over Senate sessions. In practice, neither the vice president nor the president pro tempore usually presides; instead, the duty of presiding officer is rotated among junior U.S. senators of the majority party to give them experience in parliamentary procedure.

Majority (Democratic) leadership

George J. Mitchell American politician, diplomat, and judge

George John Mitchell Jr. is an American lawyer, businessman, author, and politician. A member of the Democratic Party, Mitchell served as a United States Senator from Maine from 1980 to 1995 and as Senate Majority Leader from 1989 to 1995. He briefly served as a United States District Judge of the United States District Court for the District of Maine from 1979 to 1980.

Wendell Ford American politician

Wendell Hampton Ford was an American politician from the Commonwealth of Kentucky. He served for twenty-four years in the U.S. Senate and was the 53rd Governor of Kentucky. He was the first person to be successively elected lieutenant governor, governor and United States senator in Kentucky history. The Senate Democratic whip from 1991 to 1999, he was considered the leader of the state's Democratic Party from his election to governor in 1971 until his retirement from the Senate in 1999. At the time of his retirement, he was the longest-serving senator in Kentucky's history, a mark which was then surpassed by Mitch McConnell in 2009. He is the most recent Democrat to have served as a Senator from the state of Kentucky.

The Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee (DSCC) is the Democratic Hill committee for the United States Senate. It is the only organization solely dedicated to electing Democrats to the United States Senate. The DSCC's current Chair is Senator Catherine Cortez Masto of Nevada, who succeeded Maryland‘s Chris Van Hollen after the 2018 Senate elections. DSCC's current Executive Director is Tom Lopach, who is assisted by Deputy Executive Director Preston Elliott.

Minority (Republican) leadership

Bob Dole American politician

Robert Joseph Dole is a retired American politician, statesman, and attorney who represented Kansas in the U.S House of Representatives from 1961 to 1969 and in the U.S. Senate from 1969 to 1996, serving as the Republican Leader of the United States Senate from 1985 until 1996. He was the Republican presidential nominee in the 1996 presidential election and the party's vice presidential nominee in the 1976 presidential election.

Thad Cochran American politician

William Thad Cochran was an American attorney and politician who served as a United States Senator for Mississippi from 1978 to 2018. A Republican, he served in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1973 to 1978.

Don Nickles American politician

Donald Lee Nickles is an American politician and lobbyist who was a Republican United States Senator from Oklahoma from 1981 until 2005. He was considered both a fiscal and social conservative. After retiring from the Senate as the longest serving senator from Oklahoma (1981-2003), he founded the Nickles Group, a lobbying firm.

House of Representatives

Speaker of the House

Majority (Democratic) leadership

Minority (Republican) leadership

Caucuses

Members

This list is arranged by chamber, then by state. Senators are listed in order of seniority, and Representatives are listed by district.

Senate

Senators are popularly elected statewide every two years, with one-third beginning new six-year terms with each Congress, In this Congress, Class 1 meant their term ended with this Congress, requiring reelection in 1994; Class 2 meant their term began in the last Congress, requiring reelection in 1996; and Class 3 meant their term began in this Congress, requiring reelection in 1998.

House of Representatives

Changes in membership

Senate

State
(class)
VacatorReason for changeSuccessorDate of successor's
formal installation [lower-alpha 1]


Texas
(1)
Lloyd Bentsen (D)Resigned January 20, 1993, to become United States Secretary of the Treasury.
His successor was appointed.
Bob Krueger (D)January 21, 1993
Texas
(1)
Bob Krueger (D)Interim appointee lost special election June 6, 1993.
His successor was elected to finish the term.
Kay Bailey Hutchison (R)June 14, 1993
Alabama
(3)
Richard Shelby (D)Changed party November 9, 1994 Richard Shelby (R)November 9, 1994
Oklahoma
(2)
David L. Boren (D)Resigned November 15, 1994, to become President of the University of Oklahoma.
His successor was elected in a special election to finish the term.
Jim Inhofe (R)November 17, 1994
Tennessee
(2)
Harlan Mathews (D)Interim appointee did not seek election.
His successor was elected in a special election November 8, 1994, to finish the term.
Fred Thompson (R)December 2, 1994

House of Representatives


DistrictVacatorReason for changeSuccessorDate of successor's
formal installation [lower-alpha 1]
Wisconsin's 1st Les Aspin (D)Resigned to January 20, 1993, become United States Secretary of Defense Peter W. Barca (D)May 4, 1993
Mississippi's 2nd Mike Espy (D)Resigned January 22, 1993, to become United States Secretary of Agriculture Bennie Thompson (D)April 13, 1993
California's 17th Leon Panetta (D)Resigned January 23, 1993, to become Director of the Office of Management and Budget Sam Farr (D)June 8, 1993
Ohio 2nd Bill Gradison (R)Resigned January 31, 1993, to become president of the Health Insurance Association of America Rob Portman (R)May 4, 1993
Michigan 3rd Paul B. Henry (R)Died July 31, 1993 Vern Ehlers (R)December 7, 1993
Oklahoma's 6th Glenn English (D)Resigned January 7, 1994, to become CEO of the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association Frank Lucas (R)May 10, 1994
Kentucky's 2nd William H. Natcher (D)Died March 29, 1994 Ron Lewis (R)May 24, 1994
New Jersey 11th Dean Gallo (R)Died November 6, 1994Vacant for remainder of term
Oklahoma's 1st Jim Inhofe (R)Resigned November 15, 1994, when elected to the U.S. Senate Steve Largent (R)November 29, 1994

Committees

Lists of committees and their party leaders, for members (House and Senate) of the committees and their assignments, go into the Official Congressional Directory at the bottom of the article and click on the link (1 link), in the directory after the pages of terms of service, you will see the committees of the Senate, House (Standing with Subcommittees, Select and Special) and Joint and after the committee pages, you will see the House/Senate committee assignments in the directory, on the committees section of the House and Senate in the Official Congressional Directory, the committee's members on the first row on the left side shows the chairman of the committee and on the right side shows the ranking member of the committee.

Senate

House of Representatives

Joint committees

Employees and legislative agency directors

Legislative branch agency directors

Senate

House of Representatives

See also

Notes

  1. 1 2 This is the date the member was seated or an oath administered, not necessarily the same date her/his service began.

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