Curator of the United States Senate

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The United States Senate Curator is an employee of the United States Senate who is responsible for developing and implementing the museum and preservation programs for the Senate Commission on Art. The Curator Office collects, preserves, and interprets the Senate's fine and decorative arts, historic objects, and architectural features. Through exhibits, publications, and other programs, the Office educates the public about the Senate and its collections.

The current curatrix is Melinda Smith.

List of Senate Curators

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