United States Senate Vice Presidential Bust Collection

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The United States Senate Vice Presidential Bust Collection is a series of 45 busts in the United States Capitol, each one bearing the likenesses of a Vice President of the United States. Each sculpture, from John Adams to Dick Cheney, honors the role of the Vice President as both a member of the executive branch and as president of the Senate.

Contents

The Joint Committee on the Library, acting under a resolution of May 13, 1886, was the first to commission busts of the vice presidents to occupy the niches in the new Senate Chamber. After the first 20 busts filled the niches surrounding the Chamber, later additions were placed throughout the Senate wing of the Capitol. The collection is incomplete, since the busts of former Vice Presidents Al Gore, Joe Biden, and Mike Pence are in the process of being created. The bust of Kamala Harris will not be commissioned until she leaves office. [1] [2]

List of busts

Vice President Image [note 1] SculptorYear completedNotes
John Adams BustJohn Adams.jpg Daniel Chester French 1890 [3]
Thomas Jefferson BustThomasJefferson.jpg Moses Jacob Ezekiel 1888 [4]
Aaron Burr Aaron Burr bust.jpg Jacques Jouvenal 1893 [5]
George Clinton BustGeorgeClinton.jpg Vittorio A. Ciani 1894 [6]
Elbridge Gerry BustElbridgeGerry.jpg Herbert Samuel Adams 1892 [7]
Daniel D. Tompkins Daniel D. Tompkins bust.jpg Charles Henry Niehaus 1891 [8]
John C. Calhoun BustJohnCalhoun.jpg Theodore Augustus Mills 1896 [9]
Martin Van Buren BustMartinVanBuren.jpg Ulric Stonewall Jackson Dunbar 1894 [10]
Richard M. Johnson BustRichardJohnson.jpg James Paxton Voorhees 1895 [11]
John Tyler BustJohnTyler.jpg William C. McCauslen 1898 [12]
George M. Dallas George M Dallas by Henry Jackson Ellicott 1893.jpg Henry Jackson Ellicott 1893 [13]
Millard Fillmore Millard Fillmore bust.jpg Robert Cushing 1895 [14]
William R. King William R. King bust.jpg William C. McCauslen 1896 [15]
John C. Breckinridge John-C.-Breckinridge-bust-by-James-Paxton-Voorhees.jpg James Paxton Voorhees 1896 [16]
Hannibal Hamlin Hannibal Hamlin bust.jpg Franklin Bachelder Simmons 1889 [17]
Andrew Johnson Andrew Johnson bust.jpg William C. McCauslen 1900 [18]
Schuyler Colfax Schuyler Colfax bust.jpg Frances Murphy Goodwin 1897 [19]
Henry Wilson Henry Wilson bust.jpg Daniel Chester French 1885 [20]
William A. Wheeler William A. Wheeler bust.jpg Edward Clark Potter 1892 [21]
Chester A. Arthur Chester A. Arthur bust.jpg Augustus Saint-Gaudens 1891 [22]
Thomas A. Hendricks Thomas A. Hendricks bust.jpg Ulric Stonewall Jackson Dunbar 1890 [23]
Levi P. Morton Levi P. Morton bust.jpg Frank Edwin Elwell 1891 [24]
Adlai E. Stevenson Adlai E. Stevenson bust.jpg Franklin Bachelder Simmons 1894 [25]
Garret A. Hobart Gahobart.jpg Frank Edwin Elwell 1901 [26]
Theodore Roosevelt Theodore Roosevelt bust.jpg James Earle Fraser 1910 [27]
Charles W. Fairbanks Bust of Charles W Fairbanks.jpg Franklin Bachelder Simmons 1905 [28]
James S. Sherman BustJamesSSherman.jpg Bessie Onahotema Potter Vonnoh 1911 [29]
Thomas R. Marshall Thomas R. Marshall bust.jpg Moses A. Wainer Dykaar 1918 [30]
Calvin Coolidge Calvin Coolidge bust.jpg Moses A. Wainer Dykaar 1927 [31]
Charles G. Dawes Jo Davidson 1930 [32]
Charles Curtis Charles Curtis bust.jpg Moses A. Wainer Dykaar 1934 [33]
John N. Garner James Earle Fraser 1943 [34]
Henry A. Wallace Jo Davidson 1947 [35]
Harry S. Truman Charles Keck 1947 [36]
Alben W. Barkley Kalervo Kallio 1958 [37]
Richard M. Nixon Gualberto Rocchi 1966 [38]
Lyndon B. Johnson Jimilu Mason 1966 [39]
Hubert H. Humphrey Walker Kirtland Hancock 1982 [40]
Spiro T. Agnew William Frederick Behrends 1995 [41]
Gerald R. Ford Walker Kirtland Hancock 1985 [42]
Nelson A. Rockefeller John Calabro 1987 [43]
Walter F. Mondale Judson R. Nelson 1987 [44]
George H. W. Bush Walker Kirtland Hancock 1990 [45]
J. Danforth Quayle Frederick E. Hart 2002 [46]
Albert A. Gore, Jr. Incomplete"In process"TBD [47]
Richard B. Cheney William Frederick Behrends 2015 [48]
Joseph R. Biden, Jr. Incomplete"Not yet commissioned"TBD [47]

Notes

  1. Due to the sculptor's copyright, only images of busts carved before 1925 are included in this article, as well busts whose sculptor died at least 70 years ago.

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References

  1. Senate Vice Presidential Bust Collection, United States Senate.
  2. The Vice Presidential Bust Collection, United States Senate.
  3. John Adams. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  4. Thomas Jefferson. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  5. Aaron Burr. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  6. George Clinton. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  7. Elbridge Gerry. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  8. Daniel D. Tompkins. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  9. John C. Calhoun. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  10. Martin Van Buren. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  11. Richard M. Johnson. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  12. John Tyler. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  13. George M. Dallas. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  14. Millard Fillmore. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  15. William R. King. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  16. John C. Breckenridge. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  17. Hannibal Hamlin. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  18. Andrew Johnson. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  19. Schuyler Colfax. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  20. Henry Wilson. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  21. William A. Wheeler. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  22. Chester A. Arthur. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  23. Thomas A. Hendricks. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  24. Levi P. Morton. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  25. Adlai E. Stevenson. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  26. Garret A. Hobart. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  27. Theodore Roosevelt. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  28. Charles W. Fairbanks. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  29. James S. Sherman. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  30. Thomas R. Marshall. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  31. Calvin Coolidge. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  32. Charles G. Dawes. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  33. Charles Curtis. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  34. John N. Garner. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  35. Henry A. Wallace. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  36. Harry S. Truman. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  37. Alben W. Barkley. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  38. Richard M. Nixon. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  39. Lyndon B. Johnson. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  40. Hubert H. Humphrey. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  41. Spiro T. Agnew. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  42. Gerald R. Ford. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  43. Nelson A. Rockefeller. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  44. Walter F. Mondale. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  45. George H. W. Bush. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  46. J. Danforth Quayle. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.
  47. 1 2 "Busts of Vice Presidents of the United States". Architect of the Capitol. Retrieved 2018-10-08.
  48. Richard B. Cheney. United States Senate. Accessed January 3, 2016.

Coordinates: 38°53′27″N77°00′26″W / 38.89083°N 77.00722°W / 38.89083; -77.00722