Revolutionary War Door

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Revolutionary War Door
Flickr - USCapitol - House Bronze Doors.jpg
Artist Thomas Crawford
Year1905 (1905)
TypeBronze
Dimensions4.39 m(14 ft 5 in)
Location Washington, D.C., United States
Owner Architect of the Capitol

The Revolutionary War Door is an artwork by American sculptor Thomas Crawford, located on the United States Capitol House of Representatives wing east front in Washington, D.C., United States. This sculptured door was surveyed in 1993 as part of the Smithsonian's Save Outdoor Sculpture! program. [1]

Contents

Description

These two elaborate doors consist of six panel medallions that depict activities and events during the American Revolution. [1]

The left panel, top to bottom, depicts:

The right panel, top to bottom, depicts:

History

Crawford designed the doors in Rome between 1855 and 1857. Crawford died in 1857, leaving William H. Rinehart to create the models from Crawford's original sketches during the years of 1863–1867. The models were stored in the crypt of the Capitol until they were cast in 1904 and installed in 1905. [1]

In 1993 the door was analyzed by art conservators from the Save Outdoor Sculpture! survey program and was described as well-maintained. [1]

See also

Further reading

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 Smithsonian (1993). "Revolutionary War Door, (sculpture)". Save Outdoor Sculpture. Smithsonian. Retrieved 16 Feb 2011.