Washington nickel

Last updated
Shield nickel
United States
Value5 cents (0.05 US dollars)
Mass5.000 g (0.1615  troy oz)
Diameter20.50 mm (0.8077 in)
EdgePlain
CompositionVarious
Years of minting1866, 1909–1910
Obverse
1866 5C Five Cents, Judd-461, Pollock-535, R.5.jpg
Design George Washington
Designer James B. Longacre
Design date1866
Reverse
1866 5C Five Cents, Judd-461, Pollock-535, R.5 rev.jpg
DesignDenomination surrounded by wreath (shown), stars, or stars with rays
DesignerJames B. Longacre
Design date1866
Design discontinued1866

The Washington nickel is a pattern coin that was struck by the United States Mint in 1866 and again in 1909 and 1910. [1] [2]

Contents

1866 pieces

The Washington nickel was one of several proposed designs for the five-cent nickel coin, which was to replace the half dime as the five-cent coin of the United States. The obverse of the coin features a portrait of George Washington facing right. [3] This design was not chosen for production, and the Shield nickel was produced instead, although some patterns of the Washington nickel utilized some of the reverse designs that were eventually adopted for the Shield nickel.

The 1866 Washington nickel is relatively common for a pattern coin, and is popular with coin collectors. [4]

1909–10 pieces

In 1909 the US Mint once again struck nickel patterns with Washington's portrait. The coin was produced in two major varieties, one with Washington facing right and one facing left. [5] Only seven pieces are known to exist, all of which are in the National Numismatic Collection at the Smithsonian Institution.

Two coins with Washington facing left were struck in 1910. These, like the 1909 pieces, are at the Smithsonian. [6]

Obverse designs

Reverse designs

Related Research Articles

Quarter (United States coin) Current denomination of United States currency

The quarter, short for quarter dollar, is a United States coin worth 25 cents, one-quarter of a dollar. It has a diameter of .955 inch (24.26 mm) and a thickness of .069 inch (1.75 mm). The coin sports the profile of George Washington on its obverse, and its reverse design has changed frequently. It has been produced on and off since 1796 and consistently since 1831.

Penny (United States coin) Lowest-value physical American currency

The United States one-cent coin, often called the penny, is a unit of currency equaling one one-hundredth of a United States dollar. It has been the lowest-value physical unit of U.S. currency since the abolition of the half-cent in 1857. The first U.S. cent was produced in 1787, and the cent has been issued primarily as a copper or copper-plated coin throughout its history. Its obverse has featured the profile of President Abraham Lincoln since 1909, the centennial of his birth. From 1959 to 2008, the reverse featured the Lincoln Memorial. Four different reverse designs in 2009 honored Lincoln's 200th birthday and a new, "permanent" reverse – the Union Shield – was introduced in 2010. The coin is 0.75 inches (19.05 mm) in diameter and 0.0598 inches (1.52 mm) in thickness. Its weight has varied, depending upon the composition of metals used in its production.

Threepence (British coin) Predecimal British coin worth 1/80 of a pound sterling

The British threepence (3d) coin, usually simply known as a threepence, thruppence, or thruppenny bit, was a unit of currency equaling one eightieth of a pound sterling, or three old pence sterling. It was used in the United Kingdom, and earlier in Great Britain and England. Similar denominations were later used throughout the British Empire, notably in Australia, New Zealand, and South Africa.

Two guineas (British coin)

The Two Guineas was a gold coin first minted in England in 1664 with a face value of forty shillings. The source of the gold used, also provided the coin its name - the "Guinea", with the regular addition of an elephant or castle symbol on the earliest issues to denote bullion supplied by the Royal African Company. For most of its period of production, the coin weighed between 16.7-16.8 grams and was 31-32 millimetres in diameter, although the earliest coins of Charles II were about 0.1 grams lighter and 1 millimetre smaller.

Nickel (United States coin) Current denomination of United States currency

A nickel is a five-cent coin struck by the United States Mint. Composed of 75% copper and 25% nickel, the piece has been issued since 1866. Its diameter is .835 inches (21.21 mm) and its thickness is .077 inches (1.95 mm). Due to inflation, the purchasing power of the nickel continues to drop, and currently the coin represents less than 1% of the federal hourly minimum wage. In 2018, over 1.26 billion nickels were produced at the Philadelphia and Denver mints.

Dime (United States coin) Current denomination of United States currency

The dime, in United States usage, is a ten-cent coin, one tenth of a United States dollar, labeled formally as "one dime". The denomination was first authorized by the Coinage Act of 1792. The dime is the smallest in diameter and is the thinnest of all U.S. coins currently minted for circulation, being 0.705 inches in diameter and 0.053 in (1.35 mm) in thickness. The obverse of the current dime depicts the profile of President Franklin D. Roosevelt and the reverse boasts an olive branch, a torch, and an oak branch, from left to right respectively. As of 2011, the dime coin cost 5.65 cents to produce.

Liberty Head nickel American five-cent piece

The Liberty Head nickel, sometimes referred to as the V nickel because of its reverse design, is an American five-cent piece. It was struck for circulation from 1883 until 1912, with at least five pieces being surreptitiously struck dated 1913. The obverse features a left-facing image of the goddess of Liberty.

Half dime Former United States five-cent silver coin

The half dime, or half disme, was a silver coin, valued at five cents, formerly minted in the United States.

The Seated Liberty portrait designs appeared on most regular-issue silver United States coinage from 1836 through 1891. The denominations which featured the Goddess of Liberty in a Seated Liberty design included the half dime, the dime, the quarter, the half dollar, and until 1873 the silver dollar. Another coin that appeared exclusively in the Seated Liberty design was the twenty cent piece. This coin was produced from 1875 to 1878, and was discontinued because it looked very similar to the quarter. Seated Liberty coinage was minted at the main United States Mint in Philadelphia, as well as the branch mints in New Orleans, San Francisco, and Carson City.

Indian Head cent American one-cent coin (1859-1909)

The Indian Head cent, also known as an Indian Head penny, was a one-cent coin ($0.01) produced by the United States Bureau of the Mint from 1859 to 1909. It was designed by James Barton Longacre, the Chief Engraver at the Philadelphia Mint.

Large cent One-cent coin in the United States from 1793 to 1957

The United States large cent was a coin with a face value of 1/100 of a United States dollar. Its nominal diameter was 1​18 inch (28.57 mm). The first official mintage of the large cent was in 1793, and its production continued until 1857, when it was officially replaced by the modern-size one-cent coin.

Shield nickel First US five cent piece to be made out of copper-nickel

The Shield nickel was the first United States five-cent piece to be made out of copper-nickel, the same alloy of which American nickels are struck today. Designed by James B. Longacre, the coin was issued from 1866 until 1883, when it was replaced by the Liberty Head nickel. The coin takes its name from the motif on its obverse, and was the first five-cent coin referred to as a "nickel"—silver pieces of that denomination had been known as half dimes.

The threepence or threepenny bit was a denomination of currency used by various jurisdictions in England, Ireland, Scotland and Wales, valued at 1/80 of a pound or ¼ of a shilling until decimalisation of the pound sterling and Irish pound in 1971. It was also used in some parts of the British Empire, notably Australia, New Zealand and South Africa.

Coronet large cent One-cent coin issued by the United States Mint from 1816 to 1857

The Coronet large cent was a type of large cent issued by the United States Mint at the Philadelphia Mint from 1816 until 1839.

James B. Longacre American portraitist and engraver (1794–1869)

James Barton Longacre was an American portraitist and engraver, and the fourth Chief Engraver of the United States Mint from 1844 until his death. Longacre is best known for designing the Indian Head cent, which entered commerce in 1859, and for the designs of the Shield nickel, Flying Eagle cent and other coins of the mid-19th century.

The fifty-bani coin is a coin of the Romanian leu. The fifty-bani is also the only coin of Romania to not be steel-based, but be made completely of an alloy, and was also the first coin in the country to have a written inscription on its edge, with the introduction of 4 new coins in 2019.

The one leu coin was a coin of the Romanian leu. Introduced in 1870, it last circulated between 1992 and de facto 1996, when it was the lowest-denomination coin in the country. It was considered as circulating coin for accounting reasons and was still minted in proof sets until the 2005 denomination of the currency.

The United States has several coins and banknotes which were proposed at one time but never adopted.

Ring cent

The ring cent or holey cent was a one-cent pattern coin first struck in various compositions and designs between 1850 and 1851 as part of an experiment on producing a cent with a reduced weight and diameter, as the rising price of copper had caused cents to cost more than their face value to produce. Many varieties exist, with differing designs as well as differing compositions, including billon (standard), aluminum, copper, cupronickel, nickel silver, nickel, silver, and white metal.

References

  1. "J461/P535". uspatterns.com. Retrieved 2019-06-24.
  2. "J1934/P2017". uspatterns.com. Retrieved 2019-06-24.
  3. "J461/P535". uspatterns.com. Retrieved 2019-06-24.
  4. Reynolds, Greg (2016-12-15). "U.S. Coin Patterns for Less Than $5,000 Each, Part 4: 1866-71 5¢ Nickels". CoinWeek. Retrieved 2019-06-24.
  5. "J1934/P2017". uspatterns.com. Retrieved 2019-06-24.
  6. "J1942/P2023". uspatterns.com. Retrieved 2019-06-24.