American Gold Eagle

Last updated
Gold Eagle
United States
Value5–50 U.S. dollars (face value); see specifications
EdgeReeded
Composition91.67% Au, 3% Ag, 5.33% Cu
Years of minting1986–present (bullion)
1986–2008, 2010–present (proof)
2006–2008, 2011–present (uncirculated)
Obverse
Liberty $50 Obverse.png
Design Liberty
Designer Augustus Saint-Gaudens
Reverse
Liberty $50 Reverse.png
Design Eagle soaring above a nest
Designer Miley Busiek
Design date1986

The American Gold Eagle is an official gold bullion coin of the United States. Authorized under the Gold Bullion Coin Act of 1985, it was first released by the United States Mint in 1986. Because the term "eagle" also is the official United States designation for pre-1933 ten dollars gold coins, the weight of the bullion coin is typically used when describing American Gold Eagles (e.g., "1/2-ounce American Gold Eagle") to avoid confusion. This is particularly true with the 1/4-oz American Gold Eagle, which has a marked face value of ten dollars.

Contents

Details

Offered in 1/10 oz, 1/4 oz, 1/2 oz, and 1 oz denominations, these coins are guaranteed by the U.S. government to contain the stated amount of actual gold weight in troy ounces. By law, the gold must come from sources in the United States, alloyed with silver and copper to produce a more wear-resistant coin. In addition, sales of these and other specie coins from the US Mint are mandated, at least in part, to pay off the national debt. [1]

The 22 kt gold alloy is an English standard traditionally referred to as "crown gold". Crown gold alloys had not been used in U.S. coins since 1834, with the gold content having dropped since 1837 to a standard of 0.900 fine for U.S. gold coins. For American Gold Eagles the gold fraction was increased again to .9167 or (22 karat). It is authorized by the United States Congress and is backed by the United States Mint for weight and content.

The obverse design features a rendition of Augustus Saint-Gaudens' full-length figure of Lady Liberty with flowing hair, holding a torch in her right hand and an olive branch in her left, with the Capitol building in the left background. The design is taken from the $20 Saint-Gaudens gold coin which was commissioned by Theodore Roosevelt to create coins like the ancient Greek and Roman coins. The reverse design, by sculptor Miley Busiek, features a male eagle carrying an olive branch flying above a nest containing a female eagle and her hatchlings.

The reverse of the bullion Gold Eagle will be redesigned in 2021 and will include anti-counterfeiting measures. The new features will be introduced later on the proof and other numismatic Gold Eagles. [2]

Specifications

Gold Eagles minted 1986–1991 are dated with Roman numerals. In 1992, the U.S. Mint switched to Arabic numerals for dating Gold Eagles.

The 1/10, 1/4, and 1/2 troy oz coins are identical in design to the 1 troy oz coin except for the markings on the reverse side that indicate the weight and face value of the coin (for example, 1 OZ. fine gold~50 dollars). The print on the smaller coins is, therefore, finer and less legible than on larger denominations.

Each of the four sizes contains 91.67% gold (22 karat), 3% silver, and 5.33% copper.
Denomination1/10 troy oz1/4 troy oz1/2 troy oz1 troy oz
Diameter16.5 mm22mm27 mm32.7 mm
Thickness1.19 mm1.83 mm2.24 mm2.87 mm
Gross Weight0.1091 troy oz (3.393 g)0.2727 troy oz (8.483 g)0.5454 troy oz (16.965 g)1.0909 troy oz (33.930 g)
Face Value$5$10$25$50

The 22k gold alloyed makeup of Gold Eagle coins stands in contrast to the 24k Gold Buffalo Coin, which is minted entirely from .9999 fine gold, and therefore weighs less (1 troy oz or 31.1035 grams gross).

Value

The market value of the coins is generally about equal to the market value of their gold content, not their face value. Like all commodities, this value fluctuates with market forces. The face values are proportional to the weights except for the 1/4 oz coin.

While their actual selling price (purchasing power) varies based on the current spot price of gold, [3] these coins carry face values of $5, $10, $25, and $50. These are their legal values, reflecting their issue and monetized value as "Gold Dollars", as opposed to standard bullion. They are legal tender [4] for all debts public and private at their face values. These face values do not reflect their intrinsic value which is much greater and is mainly dictated by their weight and the current precious metal price. For example, on September 13, 2019 the U.S. Mint sold the 2016 one-ounce coin ($50 face value) at $1,510.00. [5] Since the coins can be "paid" only at a disadvantage to the payer, they are generally held as collectibles rather than money, and are subject to a high capital gains tax rate unless held in an individual retirement account. [6] [7]

In addition to standard bullion coins (sometimes referred to as "scruffies"), the United States Mint also produces proof and uncirculated versions for coin collectors. These coins carry the Mint's mark ("W") beneath the date, and are produced exclusively at the West Point Mint in West Point, New York (formerly the West Point Bullion Depository).

Mintage figures

The figures listed below are the final audited mintages from the U.S. Mint and include coins sold both individually and as part of multi-coin sets. [8]

Historical Bullion Volumes

Year$5 – 110 oz.$10 – 14 oz.$25 – 12 oz.$50 – 1 oz.
1986912,609726,031599,5661,362,650
1987580,266269,255131,2551,045,500
1988159,50049,00045,000465,500
1989264,79081,78944,829415,790
1990210,21041,00031,000373,210
1991165,20036,10024,100243,100
1992209,30059,54654,404275,000
1993210,70971,86473,324480,192
1994206,38072,65062,400221,663
1995223,02583,75253,474200,636
1996401,96460,31839,287189,148
1997528,515108,80579,605664,508
19981,344,520309,829169,0291,468,530
19992,750,338564,232263,0131,505,026
2000569,153128,96479,287433,319
2001269,14771,28048,047143,605
2002230,02762,02770,027222,029
2003245,02974,02979,029416,032
2004250,01672,01498,040417,019
2005300,04372,01580,023356,555
2006285,00660,00466,005237,510
2007190,01034,00447,002140,016
2008305,00070,00061,000710,000
2009270,000110,000110,0001,493,000
2010435,00086,00081,0001,125,000
2011350,00080,00070,000857,000
2012290,00090,00043,000675,000
2013555,000114,50057,000758,500
2014545,00090,00035,000425,000
2015980,000158,00075,000626,500
2016925,000152,00074,000817,500
2017395,00064,00037,000228,000
2018230,00062,00032,000191,000
2019195,00038,00030,000108,000

Historical Proof Volumes

During the series' initial year, the Mint only issued 1 troy oz proofs. It added 12 troy oz proofs in 1987 and since 1988 released proof variants of all four denominations. In 2009, due to increased worldwide demand for precious metals that precipitated sourcing problems and the Mint's legal obligations to produce bullion versions, proof and uncirculated versions of the Gold Eagle were not issued. [9]

Year$5 – 110 oz.$10 – 14 oz.$25 – 12 oz.$50 – 1 oz.
1986---446,290
1987--143,398147,498
1988143,88198,02876,52887,133
198984,64754,17044,79854,570
199099,34962,67451,63662,401
199170,33450,83953,12550,411
199264,87446,26940,97644,826
199358,64946,46443,81934,369
199462,84948,17244,58446,674
199562,66747,52645,38846,368
199657,04738,21935,05836,153
199734,97729,80526,34432,999
199839,39529,50325,37425,886
199948,42834,41730,42731,427
200049,97136,03632,02833,007
200137,53025,61323,24024,555
200240,86429,24226,64627,499
200340,02730,29228,27028,344
200435,13128,83927,33028,215
200549,26537,20734,31135,246
200647,27736,12734,32247,092
200758,55346,18944,02551,810
200828,11618,87722,60230,237
2009----
201054,28544,50744,52759,480
201142,69728,78226,78148,306
201220,74013,77512,80923,630
201321,74212,78912,71824,710
201422,72514,79014,69328,703
201526,76915,77515,82032,652

Historical Uncirculated Volumes

In 2009, the allocation of blanks towards the legally required production of bullion Gold Eagles affected uncirculated coin availability in addition to proof availability. However, this suspension continued into 2010 for the uncirculated version. When production resumed in 2011, without the fractional denominations which were discontinued in 2008, it was met with a weak collector response. [10]

Year$5 – 110 oz.$10 – 14 oz.$25 – 12 oz.$50 – 1 oz.
2006-W20,64315,18815,16445,053
2007-W22,50112,76611,45518,066
2008-W12,6578,88316,68211,908
2009-W----
2010-W----
2011-W---8,729
2012-W---5,829
2013-W---7,293
2014-W---7,902
2015-W---6,533
2016-W---6,888

See also

Related Research Articles

Krugerrand South African coin

The Krugerrand is a South African coin, first minted on 3 July 1967 to help market South African gold and produced by Rand Refinery and the South African Mint. The name is a compound of Paul Kruger, the former President of the South African Republic, and rand, the South African unit of currency. On the reverse side of the Krugerrand is a springbok, South Africa's national animal.

Quarter (United States coin) Current denomination of United States currency

The quarter, short for quarter dollar, is a United States coin worth 25 cents, one-quarter of a dollar. It has a diameter of .955 inch (24.26 mm) and a thickness of .069 inch (1.75 mm). The coin sports the profile of George Washington on its obverse, and its reverse design has changed frequently. It has been produced on and off since 1796 and consistently since 1831.

Precious metal rare, naturally occurring metallic chemical element of high economic and cultural value

Precious metals are rare, naturally occurring metallic chemical element of high economic value. Chemically, the precious metals tend to be less reactive than most elements. They are usually ductile and have a high lustre. Historically, precious metals were important as currency but are now regarded mainly as investment and industrial commodities. Gold, silver, platinum, and palladium each have an ISO 4217 currency code.

Dollar coin (United States) Current denomination of United States currency

The dollar coin is a United States coin with a face value of one United States dollar. It is the second largest U.S. coin currently minted for circulation in terms of physical size, with a diameter of 1.043 inches and a thickness of 0.079 in (2.0 mm), coming second to the half dollar. Dollar coins have been minted in the United States in gold, silver, and base metal versions. Dollar coins were first minted in the United States in 1794. While true gold dollars are no longer minted, the Sacagawea, Presidential, and American Innovation dollars are sometimes referred to as golden dollars because of their color.

Double eagle Gold coin

A double eagle is a gold coin of the United States with a denomination of $20. The coins are made from a 90% gold and 10% copper alloy and have a total weight of 1.0750 troy ounces.

Eagle (United States coin) United States coin

The eagle was a United States $10 gold coin issued by the United States Mint from 1792 to 1933.

American Silver Eagle Silver bullion coin of the United States

The American Silver Eagle is the official silver bullion coin of the United States.

American Platinum Eagle Platinum bullion coin of the United States

The American Platinum Eagle is the official platinum bullion coin of the United States. In 1995, Director of the United States Mint Philip N. Diehl, American Numismatic Association President David L. Ganz, and Platinum Guild International Executive Director Jacques Luben began the legislative process of creating the Platinum Eagle. After over two years of work, the 99.95% fine platinum coins were released by the United States Mint in ​110, ​14, ​12 and 1 troy oz denominations. In late 2008, the fractional denominations were discontinued, leaving only the one ounce denomination. The Platinum Eagle is authorized by the United States Congress, and is backed by the United States Mint for weight, content, and purity.

Britannia (coin) bullion coin

Britannia coins are British bullion coins issued by the Royal Mint in gold since 1987 and in silver since 1997. The coin patterns feature various depictions of Britannia, a feminine personification of the United Kingdom.

This article is a collection of numismatic and coin collecting terms with concise explanation for the beginner or professional.

Quarter eagle coin issued in the united states

The quarter eagle was a gold coin issued by the United States with a denomination of two hundred and fifty cents, or two dollars and fifty cents. It was given its name in the Coinage Act of 1792, as a derivation from the US ten-dollar eagle coin. Its purchasing power in 1800 would be equivalent to $71.12 in 2015 dollars.

Silver as an investment

Silver may be used as an investment like other precious metals. It has been regarded as a form of money and store of value for more than 4,000 years, although it lost its role as legal tender in developed countries when the use of the silver standard came to a final end in 1935. Some countries mint bullion and collector coins, however, such as the American Silver Eagle with nominal face values. In 2009, the main demand for silver was for industrial applications (40%), jewellery, bullion coins, and exchange-traded products. In 2011, the global silver reserves amounted to 530,000 tonnes.

The Canadian Silver Maple Leaf is a silver bullion coin that is issued annually by the Government of Canada. It is produced by the Royal Canadian Mint.

American Buffalo (coin) Gold bullion coin of the United States

The American Buffalo, also known as a gold buffalo, is a 24-karat bullion coin first offered for sale by the United States Mint on June 22, 2006, and available for shipment beginning on July 13. The coin follows the design of the Indian Head nickel and has gained its nickname from the American Bison on the reverse side of the design. This was the first time ever that the United States Government has minted pure (.9999) 24-karat gold coins for the public. The coin has a legal tender (face) value of US$50. Due to a combination of the coin's popularity and the tremendous increase in the price of gold since its creation the coin's value has increased considerably in a short time of just a few years. The initial 2006 U.S. Mint price of the proof coin was $800. In 2007 the Mint proof coin was $899.95, $1,410.00 in 2009, and $2,010.00 in 2011.

United States dollar Currency of the United States of America

The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States and its territories per the Coinage Act of 1792. One dollar is divided into 100 cents, or into 1000 mills for accounting and taxing purposes. The Coinage Act of 1792 created a decimal currency by creating the dime, nickel, and penny coins, as well as the dollar, half dollar, and quarter dollar coins, all of which are still minted in 2020.

America the Beautiful quarters Series of U.S. coins

The America the Beautiful quarters are a series of 25-cent pieces (quarters) issued by the United States Mint starting in 2010 and scheduled to continue until 2021. The obverse (front) of all the coins depicts George Washington in a modified version of the portrait used for the original 1932 Washington quarter. There will be five new reverse (back) designs each year, each commemorating a national park or national site – one from each state, the federal district, and each territory. The program is authorized by the America’s Beautiful National Parks Quarter Dollar Coin Act of 2008.

Chinese Gold Panda Chinese gold bullion coin

The Chinese Gold Panda is a series of gold bullion coins issued by the People's Republic of China. The Official Mint of the People's Republic of China introduced the panda gold bullion coins in 1982. The panda design changes every year and the Gold Panda coins come in different sizes and denominations, ranging from 1/20 troy oz. to 1 troy oz..

Gold coin coin made from gold

A gold coin is a coin that is made mostly or entirely of gold. Most gold coins minted since 1800 are 90–92% gold, while most of today's gold bullion coins are pure gold, such as the Britannia, Canadian Maple Leaf, and American Buffalo. Alloyed gold coins, like the American Gold Eagle and South African Krugerrand, are typically 91.7% gold by weight, with the remainder being silver and copper.

Vienna Philharmonic (coin) bullion coin

The Vienna Philharmonic, often shortened Philharmonic, is a bullion coin of gold, silver, or platinum, produced by the Austrian Mint. It is named for the Vienna Philharmonic orchestra, which inspires the design of both sides of the coins. The one troy ounce (ozt) gold version was first introduced in 1989 with a face value of 2,000 Austrian schillings (ATS) and is generally one of the world's best selling bullion coins. In 2002, with the adoption of the euro currency, the nominal value of the one ounce coin was changed to €100. In 2008, the Mint introduced a one-ounce silver version of the coin with a nominal value of €1.50. The silver coin is also one of the top selling bullion coins, ranked third in 2013. In 2016, the mint introduced a one ounce platinum coin with a face value of €100.

American Palladium Eagle Palladium bullion coin of the United States

The American Palladium Eagle is the official palladium bullion coin of the United States. Each coin has a face value of $25 and contains 99.95% fine palladium. It was authorized by the American Eagle Palladium Bullion Coin Act of 2010 which became Public Law 111-303 passed during the 111th United States Congress. The Palladium Eagle uses Adolph Weinman's obverse design on the Mercury dime, Liberty wearing a winged hat, while its reverse design is based on Weinman's 1907 American Institute of Architects (AIA) medal design.

References

  1. 31 U.S.C.A. § 5116(2)
  2. "U.S. Mint to redesign gold and silver American Eagles, implement security devices". CoinWorld. Retrieved 2019-10-13.
  3. "Historical London Fix Prices 2019 | Kitco". www.kitco.com.
  4. http://www.usmint.gov/downloads/mint_programs/am_eagles/AmerEagleGold.pdf
  5. "American Eagle 2016 One Ounce Gold Proof Coin". United States Mint.
  6. 26 U.S.C.   § 1 : Tax imposed: 28-percent rate gain
  7. 26 U.S.C.   § 408 : Individual retirement accounts: Investment in collectibles treated as distributions
  8. "Gold Eagle Mintages | American Gold Eagles". goldeagleguide.com. Retrieved 2018-09-09.
  9. "2009 American Gold Eagle". goldeagleguide.com. Retrieved 2018-09-09.
  10. "2011 Uncirculated Gold Eagle". www.coinnews.net. Retrieved 2018-09-09.