Carson City Mint

Last updated
U.S. Mint
Nevada State Museum.jpg
Carson City Mint at night
Location600 N. Carson St.
Carson City, Nevada
Coordinates 39°10′03″N119°46′02″W / 39.16750°N 119.76722°W / 39.16750; -119.76722 Coordinates: 39°10′03″N119°46′02″W / 39.16750°N 119.76722°W / 39.16750; -119.76722
Architect Alfred Bult Mullett
NRHP reference No. 75002127
 No.196
Added to NRHPSeptember 5, 1975

The Carson City Mint was a branch of the United States Mint in Carson City, Nevada. It primarily minted silver coins; however, it also minted gold coins, with a total face value in dollars nearly equal to that of its silver coins. The mint minted coins in 21 different years.

Contents

The Carson City Mint was created in 1863 but was not put into operation until 1870. It ran until 1885, went on a hiatus, and resumed operations in 1889, after which it ran until 1893, when it closed permanently. It is now the Nevada State Museum, Carson City.

History

Carson City Mint, 1866 Carson City Mint (1866).jpg
Carson City Mint, 1866

Built at the peak of the silver boom conveniently near a local silver mine, 50 issues of silver coins and 57 issues of gold coins minted here between 1870 and 1893 bore the "CC" mint mark. The mint was established in Carson City to facilitate minting of silver coins from silver in the Comstock Lode, much as the San Francisco Mint was established to facilitate minting gold coins from the gold of the California gold rush. From 1895 to 1933, the building served as the U.S. Assay Office for gold and silver. The federal government sold the building to the state of Nevada in 1939. Coins struck here, especially Morgan dollars, are generally rare and command a high premium among collectors.

The building that housed the mint was the first designed by Alfred B. Mullett after becoming Supervising Architect of the Department of the Treasury. The construction supervisor was Abraham Curry, also known as the "Father of Carson City." The simple Renaissance Revival-style stone facade has pairs of round-headed windows and a center portico. It is now the home of the Nevada State Museum. Although the mint has not struck United States coins since 1893, Coin Press No. 1 (the original coin press from the mint) is still in the building and used to strike commemorative medallions with the "CC" mint mark. The most recent of these are medallions commemorating the 75th anniversary of the museum.

Proposed commemorative coin production

On July 16, 2019, a bill was introduced proposing to strike commemorative Morgan and Peace dollars on the premises of the Nevada State Museum in 2021. [1] If passed, the coins will feature the "CC" mint mark, becoming the first legal tender coins to do so in 128 years. [2] Aside from adding a new date to both the Morgan and Peace dollar series, it would be the first time the Peace dollar is struck with the mint mark.

The bill has received support from many coin collectors, with the American Numismatic Association encouraging collectors to express their support. However, some collectors have voiced their concerns about the mintage limit of 500,000 pieces. [3]

Though 2021 Morgan commemorative dollars were struck with a 'CC' privy mark, they were not struck at the former Carson City Mint.

Denominations minted

Silver denominations

Seated Liberty dime (1871–1878)
Twenty-cent piece (1875–76)
Seated Liberty quarter (1870–1878)
Seated Liberty half dollar (1870–1878)
Seated Liberty dollar (1870–1873)
Trade dollar (1873–1878)
Morgan dollar (1878–1885 and 1889-1893)

Note: A Seated Liberty dollar was the first coin to be struck at Carson City.

Gold denominations

Half eagle or $5.00 gold (1870–1884 and 1890–1893)
Eagle or $10.00 gold (1870–1884 and 1890–1893)
Double eagle or $20.00 gold (1870–1879, 1882-1885, and 1889–1893) [4]

Photos

See also

Related Research Articles

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<span class="mw-page-title-main">William Barber (engraver)</span>

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<span class="mw-page-title-main">Charles E. Barber</span> American engraver

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<span class="mw-page-title-main">Peace dollar</span> US dollar coin (1921–1928, 1934–1935, 2021–present)

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<span class="mw-page-title-main">Morgan dollar</span> U.S. dollar coin (1878–1904, 1921, 2021–present)

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<span class="mw-page-title-main">Seated Liberty dollar</span> United States silver dollar coin minted from 1840–1873

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<span class="mw-page-title-main">West Point Mint</span> Branch of the United States Mint

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<span class="mw-page-title-main">Barber coinage</span> American coins

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<span class="mw-page-title-main">Trade dollar (United States coin)</span> US silver trade coin (1873–1885)

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<span class="mw-page-title-main">Nevada State Museum, Carson City</span>

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<span class="mw-page-title-main">Numismatic history of the United States</span> History of coin collecting in the United States

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<span class="mw-page-title-main">Liberty Head double eagle</span> American twenty-dollar gold piece

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<span class="mw-page-title-main">Liberty dollar</span> Index of articles associated with the same name

Liberty dollar may refer to:

References

  1. Cleaver, Emanuel (2019-07-15). "H.R.3757 – 116th Congress (2019–2020): 1921 Silver Dollar Commemorative Coin Act". www.congress.gov. Retrieved 2019-07-30.
  2. "Commem legislation seeks Morgan dollar struck at Carson City". CoinWorld. Retrieved 2019-07-30.
  3. "ANA rallies collectors to urge congressional support for Morgan and Peace dollars bill". CoinWorld. Retrieved 2019-07-30.
  4. Goe, Rusty (2020), The Confident Carson City Coin Collector – 3-Volume Set: Reno, NV: Southgate Coins Publishing: ISBN 978-0974616940
Preceded by Nevada Historical Markers
196
Succeeded by