American Palladium Eagle

Last updated
Palladium Eagle
United States
Value25.00 U.S. dollars (face value)
Mass31.120 g (1.0005  troy oz)
Diameter34.036 mm (1.340 in)
EdgeReeded
Composition99.95% Pd
Years of minting2017–present
Obverse
2017 $25 Palladium obverse.jpg
DesignWinged Liberty
Designer Adolph A. Weinman (original Mercury dime)
Design date1916
Reverse
2017 $25 Palladium reverse.jpg
DesignStanding eagle with upraised wings pulling a laurel branch out of a rock
DesignerAdolph A. Weinman (original concept for the 1907 American Institute of Architects gold medal)
Design date1907

The American Palladium Eagle is the official palladium bullion coin of the United States. Each coin has a face value of $25 and contains 99.95% fine palladium. It was authorized by the American Eagle Palladium Bullion Coin Act of 2010 which became Public Law 111-303 [1] passed during the 111th United States Congress. The Palladium Eagle uses Adolph Weinman's obverse design on the Mercury dime, Liberty wearing a winged hat, while its reverse design is based on Weinman's 1907 American Institute of Architects (AIA) medal design. [2]

Contents

A bullion version sold directly to the United States Mint's authorized purchasers was released on September 25, 2017 [2] and a proof version priced at $1,387.50 was released on September 6, 2018. Both offerings were met with a strong response; the 2017 bullion version sold out the day of release and within five minutes, sales of the 2018 proof version were suspended pending verification of the existing 14,782 of 15,000 maximum orders. Secondary market sales for the proof version were also strong on September 6 with many listings selling at a $600 premium over the Mint's asking price. [3] A 2019 reverse proof version was released on September 12, 2019. [4]

Mintage figures

The mintage of the 2017 Bullion and 2018-W Proof finishes were limited to a maximum of 15,000 pieces each while the 2019-W Reverse Proof finish is limited to 30,000. [4] Another coin, with an uncirculated finish, is planned for 2020. [5]

American Palladium Eagle mintage figures
Year/
Mintmark
Mintage
Limit
Mintage
BullionProofReverse
Proof
Total
201715,000 [6] 15,000 [7] --15,000
2018-W15,000 [8] -14,986 [9] -14,986
2019-W30,000 [4] --TBDTBD
2020-W10,000 [10] TBD--TBD
Total70,00015,000+14,986TBD29,986+

See also

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References

  1. "American Eagle Palladium Bullion Coin Act of 2010" (PDF). Library of Congress. December 14, 2010. Retrieved February 3, 2018.
  2. 1 2 "American Palladium Eagle Bullion Coin Debuts on Sept. 25, 2017". CoinNews.net. September 18, 2017. Retrieved October 1, 2017.
  3. "Sales of American Eagle palladium coin took five minutes to end". Coin World. Retrieved 2018-09-11.
  4. 1 2 3 Gilkes, Paul. "Sales kick off for Reverse Proof 2019-W American Eagle palladium $25 coin". coinworld.com. Amos Media Company. Retrieved 24 December 2019.
  5. "American Eagle 2020 One Ounce Palladium Uncirculated Coin". United States Mint. Retrieved 2020-02-25.
  6. "Introducing The 1st Palladium American Eagle. Low Mintage - 15,000 Coins". Bullion Exchanges. Retrieved August 30, 2018.
  7. "Bullion Sales | U.S. Mint". www.usmint.gov. Retrieved 2019-08-20.
  8. "2018 Proof Palladium American Eagles Release- Limited to 15,000 Coins!". Bullion Exchanges. Retrieved August 30, 2018.
  9. "Cumulative Sales Figures | U.S. Mint". www.usmint.gov. Retrieved 2019-08-20.
  10. "American Eagle 2020 One Ounce Palladium Uncirculated Coin". United States Mint. Retrieved 2020-09-09.