United States five-dollar bill

Last updated
Five dollars
(United States)
Value$5
Width6 9/64 inches ≈ 156 mm
Height2 39/64 inches ≈ 66.3 mm
Weight0.035 oz. ≈ 1 [1]  g
Security featuresSecurity fibers, watermark, security thread, micro printing, raised printing, EURion constellation
Material used75% cotton
25% linen
Years of printing1861–present
Obverse
US $5 Series 2006 obverse.jpg
Design Abraham Lincoln
Design date2006
Reverse
US $5 Series 2006 reverse.jpg
Design Lincoln Memorial
Design date2006

The United States five-dollar bill ($5) is a denomination of United States currency. The current $5 bill features a portrait of Abraham Lincoln, the 16th U.S. president (1861-1865), on the front and the Lincoln Memorial on the back. All $5 bills issued today are Federal Reserve Notes.

Contents

The $5 bill is sometimes nicknamed a "fin". The term has German/Yiddish roots and is remotely related to the English "five", but it is far less common today than it was in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. [2]

As of December 2018, the average life of a $5 bill in circulation is 4.7 years before it is replaced due to wear. [3] Approximately 6% of all paper currency produced by the U.S. Treasury's Bureau of Engraving and Printing in 2009 were $5 bills. [4]

Current design

Mathew Brady portrait of Lincoln taken on February 9, 1864, used for the current $5 bill (series 1999 issue and later). Abraham Lincoln, President, U.S - NARA - 528388.jpg
Mathew Brady portrait of Lincoln taken on February 9, 1864, used for the current $5 bill (series 1999 issue and later).

The redesigned $5 bill was unveiled on September 20, 2007, and was issued on March 13, 2008 during a ceremony at President Lincoln's Cottage.[ citation needed ]

Security Features

New and enhanced security features make it easier to check the new $5 bill and more difficult for potential counterfeiters to reproduce. The redesigned $5 bill has:[ citation needed ]

The reverse of the five-dollar bill has two rectangular strips that are blanked out when viewed in the infrared spectrum, as seen in this image taken by an infrared camera. Series 2009 Five Dollar Bill in Infrared.jpg
The reverse of the five-dollar bill has two rectangular strips that are blanked out when viewed in the infrared spectrum, as seen in this image taken by an infrared camera.

The five dollar bill lacks the optically variable ink of higher denomination US bills.[ citation needed ]

Design features

The new $5 bills remain the same size and use the same—but enhanced—portraits and historical images. The most noticeable difference is the light-purple coloring of the center of the bill, which blends into gray near the edges.[ citation needed ]

Similar to the recently redesigned $10, $20, $50, and $100 bills, the new $5 bill features an American symbol of freedom printed in the background: The Great Seal of the United States, featuring an eagle and shield, is printed in purple to the right of the portrait and an arc of purple stars surround both it and the portrait.[ citation needed ]

When the Lincoln Memorial was constructed the names of 48 states were engraved on it. The picture of the Lincoln Memorial on the $5 bill only contains the names of 26 states. These are the 26 states that can be seen on the front side of the Lincoln memorial which is what is pictured on the $5 bill.[ citation needed ]

On the back of the bill, a larger, purple numeral "5" appears in the lower right corner to help those with visual impairments to distinguish the denomination. This large "5" also includes the words "USA FIVE" in tiny white letters.[ citation needed ]

The oval borders around President Lincoln's portrait on the front, and the Lincoln Memorial vignette on the back have been removed. Both engravings have been enhanced.[ citation needed ]

Redesign

On April 20, 2016, Treasury Secretary Jacob Lew announced that the $5, $10, and $20 would all undergo redesign prior to 2020. The changes would add new features to combat counterfeiting and make them easier for blind citizens to distinguish. Lew said that while Lincoln would remain on the obverse, the reverse would be redesigned to depict various historical events that had occurred at the Lincoln Memorial. Among the planned designs are images from Martin Luther King Jr. giving his 1963 speech "I Have a Dream" and the 1939 concert by opera singer Marian Anderson. [7] As of January 2021, the Treasury has continued work on the $20 bill; the redesigns of the $5 and $10 were not mentioned. [8]

Large size note history

1862 $5 Legal Tender note US-$5-LT-1862-Fr-61a.jpg
1862 $5 Legal Tender note
1880 $5 Legal Tender US-$5-LT-1880-Fr-72.jpg
1880 $5 Legal Tender
1891 $5 Silver Certificate depicting Ulysses S. Grant. US-$5-SC-1891-Fr.266.jpg
1891 $5 Silver Certificate depicting Ulysses S. Grant.
1896 $5 Silver Certificate from the "Educational Series". US-$5-SC-1896-Fr.270.jpg
1896 $5 Silver Certificate from the "Educational Series".

(approximately 7.4218 × 3.125 in ≅ 189 × 79 mm)

Small size note history

(6.14 × 2.61 in ≅ 156 × 66 mm)

The first small-size $5 United States Note printed (Smithsonian). US-$5-LT-1928-Fr.1525.jpg
The first small-size $5 United States Note printed (Smithsonian).
Hawaii overprint note. US-$5-FRN-1934-A-Fr.2302.jpg
Hawaii overprint note.
The first 1953 $5 Silver Certificate printed (Smithsonian). US-$5-SC-1953-Fr.1655.jpg
The first 1953 $5 Silver Certificate printed (Smithsonian).

Series dates

Small size

TypeSeries Register Treasurer Seal
National Bank Note Types 1 & 21929 Jones Woods Brown
Federal Reserve Bank Note 1929JonesWoodsBrown
TypeSeries Treasurer Secretary Seal
Legal Tender Note 1928 Woods Mellon Red
Legal Tender Note1928AWoods Mills Red
Legal Tender Note1928B Julian Morgenthau Red
Legal Tender Note1928CJulianMorgenthauRed
Legal Tender Note1928DJulian Vinson Red
Legal Tender Note1928EJulian Snyder Red
Legal Tender Note1928F Clark SnyderRed
Legal Tender Note1953 Priest Humphrey Red
Legal Tender Note1953APriest Anderson Red
Legal Tender Note1953B Smith Dillon Red
Legal Tender Note1953C Granahan DillonRed
Legal Tender Note1963GranahanDillonRed
Silver Certificate 1934 Julian Morgenthau Blue
Silver Certificate1934AJulianMorgenthauBlue
Silver Certificate1934A North AfricaJulianMorgenthauYellow
Silver Certificate1934BJulian Vinson Blue
Silver Certificate1934CJulian Snyder Blue
Silver Certificate1934D Clark SnyderBlue
Silver Certificate1953 Priest Humphrey Blue
Silver Certificate1953APriest Anderson Blue
Silver Certificate1953B Smith Dillon Blue
Federal Reserve Note 1928 Tate MellonGreen
Federal Reserve Note1928AWoodsMellonGreen
Federal Reserve Note1928BWoodsMellonGreen
Federal Reserve Note1928CWoodsMillsGreen
Federal Reserve Note1928DWoods Woodin Green
Federal Reserve Note1934JulianMorgenthauGreen
Federal Reserve Note1934 HawaiiJulianMorgenthauBrown
Federal Reserve Note1934AJulianMorgenthauGreen
Federal Reserve Note1934A HawaiiJulianMorgenthauBrown
Federal Reserve Note1934BJulianVinsonGreen
Federal Reserve Note1934CJulianSnyderGreen
Federal Reserve Note1934DClarkSnyderGreen
Federal Reserve Note1950ClarkSnyderGreen
Federal Reserve Note1950APriestHumphreyGreen
Federal Reserve Note1950BPriestAndersonGreen
Federal Reserve Note1950CSmithDillonGreen
Federal Reserve Note1950DGranahanDillonGreen
Federal Reserve Note1950EGranahan Fowler Green
Federal Reserve Note1963GranahanDillonGreen
Federal Reserve Note1963AGranahanFowlerGreen
Federal Reserve Note1969 Elston Kennedy Green
Federal Reserve Note1969A Kabis Connally Green
Federal Reserve Note1969B Bañuelos ConnallyGreen
Federal Reserve Note1969CBañuelos Shultz Green
Federal Reserve Note1974 Neff Simon Green
Federal Reserve Note1977 Morton Blumenthal Green
Federal Reserve Note1977AMorton Miller Green
Federal Reserve Note1981 Buchanan Regan Green
Federal Reserve Note1981A Ortega ReganGreen
Federal Reserve Note1985Ortega Baker Green
Federal Reserve Note1988Ortega Brady Green
Federal Reserve Note1988A Villalpando BradyGreen
Federal Reserve Note1993 Withrow Bentsen Green
Federal Reserve Note1995Withrow Rubin Green
Federal Reserve Note1999Withrow Summers Green
Federal Reserve Note2001 Marin O'Neill Green
Federal Reserve Note2003Marin Snow Green
Federal Reserve Note2003A Cabral SnowGreen
Federal Reserve Note2006Cabral Paulson Green
Federal Reserve Note2009 Rios Geithner Green
Federal Reserve Note2013Rios Lew Green
Federal Reserve Note2017A Carranza Mnuchin Green

See also

Related Research Articles

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References

  1. "Currency Facts". uscurrency.gov. U.S. Currency Education Program. Retrieved 15 July 2020.
  2. "5 Currency Facts You Probably Didn't Know About the US $5 Dollar Bill | Currency Exchange International, Corp". www.ceifx.com. Retrieved 2020-01-16.
  3. "The Fed - FAQs".
  4. "Money Facts". Bureau of Engraving and Printing. Archived from the original on 2005-12-06.
  5. Fred L. Reed III. "New $5 Image Likely to Be Iconic". NumiMaster. Archived from the original on 2015-02-27. Retrieved 2015-02-27.
  6. "uscurrency.gov.gov - The Redesigned $5 Note". US Currency Education Program.
  7. "Anti-slavery activist Harriet Tubman to replace Jackson on $20 bill".
  8. Dishman, Lydia (January 25, 2021). "Harriet Tubman will finally replace Andrew Jackson as the face of the $20 bill". Fast Company. Retrieved January 30, 2021.
  9. "USPaperMoney.Info: Series 1993 $5". www.uspapermoney.info.
  10. "USPaperMoney.Info: Series 1999 $5". www.uspapermoney.info.
  11. "USPaperMoney.Info: Series 2006 $5". www.uspapermoney.info.