Janet Yellen

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Akerlof, George A.; Yellen, Janet L., eds. (October 31, 1986). Efficiency Wage Models of the Labor Market . Cambridge University Press. doi:10.1017/cbo9780511559594. ISBN   978-0-521-31284-4.
  • Blinder, Alan S.; Yellen, Janet L. (2001). The Fabulous Decade: Macroeconomic Lessons from the 1990s . New York: The Century Foundation Press. ISBN   0-87078-467-6. OCLC   47018413.
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    Janet Yellen
    Secretary Janet Yellen portrait.jpg
    Yellen in 2021
    78th United States Secretary of the Treasury
    Assumed office
    January 26, 2021

    Official

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