Lloyd Austin

Last updated

Austin, Lloyd J.; Pollack, Kenneth M.; Wittes, Tamara Cofman (August 14, 2015). The Middle East in Transition (Report). Washington, DC: Brookings Institution.
  • Austin, Lloyd J. (September 16, 2015). Statement of General Lloyd J. Austin III, Commander, U.S. Central Command, Before the Senate Armed Services Committee on Operation Inherent Resolve (PDF) (Speech).
  • Citations

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    77. 1 2 "Austin arrives in Tokyo for talks expected to include cooperation on China, North Korea". Stars and Stripes. Retrieved March 16, 2021.
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    97. "Austin, Charlene – USA > CAPSTONE > Spouse Course Mentors". capstone.ndu.edu. Archived from the original on December 8, 2020. Retrieved December 14, 2020.
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    General sources

    Further reading

    Lloyd Austin
    Defense Secretary Lloyd J. Austin III (50885754687).jpg
    28th United States Secretary of Defense
    Assumed office
    January 22, 2021

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