Vice Chief of Staff of the United States Army

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Vice Chief of Staff of the Army
Flag of the Vice Chief of Staff of the United States Army.svg
Flag of the Vice Chief of Staff of the Army
Gen Joseph M Martin 37th VCSA (1).jpg
Incumbent
General Joseph M. Martin

since July 26, 2019
United States Army
Army Staff
AbbreviationVCSA
Member ofArmy Staff
Joint Requirements Oversight Council
Reports to Chief of Staff of the Army
Seat The Pentagon, Arlington County, Virginia, U.S.
AppointerThe President
with Senate advice and consent
Term length Not fixed
Constituting instrument 10 U.S.C.   § 3034
Precursor Deputy Chief of Staff of the United States Army
FormationNovember 1, 1948
First holder GEN J. Lawton Collins
SuccessionFirst in Chief of Staff succession
DeputyDirector of the Army Staff
Website www.army.mil/

The vice chief of staff of the Army (VCSA) is the principal deputy to the chief of staff of the Army, and is the second-highest-ranking officer on active duty in the Department of the Army.

Contents

The vice chief of staff generally handles the day-to-day administration of the Army Staff, freeing the chief of staff to attend to the interservice responsibilities of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. By statute, the vice chief of staff is appointed as a four-star general in the United States Army while so serving.

The incumbent vice chief of staff of the Army, since July 2019, is General Joseph M. Martin.

Role

The senior leadership of the U.S. Department of the Army consists of two civilians, the secretary of the Army and the under secretary of the Army, as well as two commissioned officers, the Army Chief of Staff and the Army Vice Chief of Staff.

Under the supervision and direction of the secretary of the Army (who in turn is under the authority, direction and control of the secretary of defense) the vice chief of staff assists the chief of staff on missions and functions related to their duties. The vice chief of staff also assists the chief of staff in the management/oversight of U.S. Army installations and facilities.

Furthermore, the vice chief of staff may also represent the Army at the Office of the Secretary of Defense/Joint Staff level in areas relating to the chief of staff's responsibility and U.S. Army capabilities, requirements, policy, plans, and programs. The vice chief of staff is the designated Army representative to the Joint Requirements Oversight Council (JROC).

If the chief of staff is incapacitated or otherwise relieved of duty, the vice chief of staff serves as the acting chief of staff. If both the chief of staff and the vice chief of staff were to be incapacitated, the senior-most general on the Army Staff would become the acting chief of staff of the Army until someone else is appointed. [1] [2]

Appointment

The vice chief of staff of the Army is appointed by the president, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, from among the general officers of the Army.

Unlike the chief of staff of the Army, there is no fixed term nor term limit to the position of the vice chief of staff, although most of those appointed to the office have typically served for two or three year tenures.

List of Vice Chiefs of Staff of the Army

No.PortraitVice Chief of Staff
of the Army
Took officeLeft officeTime in officeNotes Chief of Staff
1
J-lawton-collins-1948.jpg
General
J. Lawton Collins [4]
(1896–1987)
1 November 194815 August 1949287 days Chief of Staff of the Army (1949–53)
U.S. Representative to NATO (1953–54)
Special Representative in South Vietnam (1954–55)
U.S. Representative to NATO (1955–56)
Retired, 1956.
Omar N. Bradley
2
Wade Haislip.jpg
General
Wade H. Haislip
(1889–1971)
16 August 194930 July 19511 year, 347 daysRetired, 1951 J. Lawton Collins
3
John E. Hull (GEN) (cropped).jpg
General
John E. Hull
(1895–1975)
30 July 195114 August 19532 years, 15 daysCommander of Far East Command (1953–55)
Retired, 1955.
J. Lawton Collins
4
Charles L. Bolte.jpg
General
Charles L. Bolte
(1895–1989)
15 August 195329 June 19551 year, 318 daysRetired, 1955 Matthew B. Ridgway
5
Williston B Palmer.jpg
General
Williston B. Palmer
(1899–1973)
30 June 195531 May 19571 year, 335 daysDeputy Commander, USEUCOM (1957–59)
Director of Military Assistance, OSD, (1959–60)
Retired, 1960
Matthew B. Ridgway
Maxwell D. Taylor
6
Lyman L. Lemnitzer.jpg
General
Lyman L. Lemnitzer
(1899–1988)
June 1, 1957June 30, 19592 years, 29 daysChief of Staff (1959–60)
Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff (1960–62)
SACEUR/CINCUSEUCOM (1963–69)
Retired, 1969
Maxwell D. Taylor
7
Decker.jpg
General
George H. Decker
(1902–1980)
July 1, 1959September 29, 19601 year, 90 daysChief of Staff (1960–62)
Retired, 1962
Lyman L. Lemnitzer
8
Clyde Davis Eddleman.jpg
General
Clyde D. Eddleman
(1902–1992)
September 30, 1960March 31, 19621 year, 181 daysRetired, 1962 Lyman L. Lemnitzer
George H. Decker
9
Barksdale Hamlett.jpg
General
Barksdale Hamlett
(1908–1979)
1 April 1962September 3, 19642 years, 155 daysRetired, 1964 George H. Decker
Earle G. Wheeler
Harold K. Johnson
10
GEN Creighton W Abrams.JPG
General
Creighton Abrams
(1914–1974)
September 4, 1964April 30, 19672 years, 238 daysDeputy Commander, Military Assistance Command, Vietnam (1967–68)
Commander, Military Assistance Command, Vietnam (1968–72)
Chief of Staff (1972–74)
Died in office, 1974.
Harold K. Johnson
11
Ralph Edward Haines Jr USARPAC.jpg
General
Ralph E. Haines Jr.
(1913–2011)
May 1, 1967July 2, 19681 year, 62 daysCommander, United States Army Pacific (1968–70)
Commander, Continental Army Command (1970–73)
Retired, 1973
Harold K. Johnson
12
GEN Bruce Palmer.jpg
General
Bruce Palmer Jr.
(1913–2000)
July 3, 1968January 31, 19734 years, 212 daysActing Chief of Staff (July–October 1972)
Commander, United States Readiness Command (1973–74)
Retired, 1974
William C. Westmoreland
Creighton W. Abrams
13
General Alexander Meigs Haig, Jr.jpg
General
Alexander Haig
(1924–2010)
February 1, 1973July 31, 1973180 days Chief of Staff to the President (1973–74)
SACEUR/CINCUSEUCOM (1974–79)
Retired, 1979
Secretary of State (1981–82)
Creighton W. Abrams
14
Frederick Carlton Weyand.jpg
General
Frederick C. Weyand
(1916–2010)
August 1, 1973October 20, 19741 year, 80 daysChief of Staff, 1974–76
Retired, 1976
Creighton W. Abrams
15
WalterKerwin.JPG
General
Walter T. Kerwin Jr.
(1917–2008)
October 21, 1974September 23, 1978~4 yearsRetired, 1978 Frederick C. Weyand
Bernard W. Rogers
16
Frederick Kroesen VCSA.JPG
General
Frederick J. Kroesen
(1923–2020)
October 26, 1978October 7, 1979~1 yearCommander, United States Army Europe (1979–83)
Retired, 1983
Bernard W. Rogers
Edward C. Meyer
17
Gen John Vessey Jr.JPG
General
John William Vessey Jr.
(1922–2016)
October 10, 1979January 19, 1982~3 years Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff (1982–85)
Retired, 1985
Special emissary to Vietnam for missing American service personnel (1985–96)
Edward C. Meyer
18
General John Wickham, official military photo 1988.JPEG
General
John A. Wickham Jr.
(born 1928)
January 27, 1982August 11, 1983~1 yearChief of Staff (1983–87)
Retired, 1987
Edward C. Meyer
John A. Wickham Jr.
19
MaxwellThurman VCSA.JPEG
General
Maxwell R. Thurman
(1931–1995)
August 26, 1983February 4, 1987~4 yearsCommander, Training and Doctrine Command (1987–89)
Commander, United States Southern Command (1990–91)
Retired, 1991
John A. Wickham Jr.
20
Arthur E Brown.jpg
General
Arthur E. Brown Jr.
(born 1929)
February 15, 1987January 20, 1989~2 yearsRetired, 1989 John A. Wickham Jr.
Carl E. Vuono
21
Robert RisCassi 4 Star Photo.jpg
General
Robert W. RisCassi
(born 1936)
January 21, 1989December 10, 1990~1 yearCommander, Eighth United States Army (1990–92)
Commander, United States Forces Korea (1992–93)
Retired, 1993
Carl E. Vuono
22
Gordon Sullivan VCSA.JPEG
General
Gordon R. Sullivan
(born 1937)
December 17, 1990April 27, 1991~1 yearChief of Staff, 1991–95
Retired, 1995
Carl E. Vuono
23
Dennis Reimer, official military photo 1991.JPEG
General
Dennis J. Reimer
(born 1939)
May 14, 1991January 20, 1993~2 yearsCommander, Forces Command (1993–95)
Chief of Staff (1995–99)
Retired, 1999
Carl E. Vuono
Gordon R. Sullivan
24
BinfordPeay.JPEG
General
J. H. Binford Peay III
(born 1940)
January 23, 1993January 15, 1994~1 yearCommander, Central Command, 1994–97
Retired, 1997
Gordon R. Sullivan
25
John H Tilelli.jpg
General
John H. Tilelli Jr.
(born 1941)
January 20, 1994January 2, 1995~1 yearCommander, Forces Command (1995–96)
Commander, U.S. Forces Korea (1996–99)
Retired, 2000
Gordon R. Sullivan
26
Ronald H Grffith.jpg
General
Ronald H. Griffith
(1936–2018)
January 26, 1995July 20, 1997~2 yearsRetired, 1997 Gordon R. Sullivan
Dennis J. Reimer
27
William W Crouch.jpg
General
William W. Crouch
(born 1941)
August 6, 1997November 22, 1998~1 yearRetired, 1998 Dennis J. Reimer
28
Eric Shinseki official portrait.jpg
General
Eric K. Shinseki
(born 1942)
November 24, 1998June 21, 1999209 daysChief of Staff (1999–2003)
Retired, 2003.
Secretary of Veterans Affairs (2009–14)
Dennis J. Reimer
29
Jack Keane.jpg
General
John M. Keane
(born 1943)
June 22, 1999October 16, 20034 years, 116 daysRetired, 2003. Eric K. Shinseki
30
Casey Vice Chief of Staff.jpg
General
George W. Casey Jr.
(born 1948)
October 17, 2003July 23, 2004280 daysCommander Multi-National Force – Iraq (2004–07)
Chief of Staff (2007–11)
Retired, 2011
Eric K. Shinseki
31
Richard A Cody.jpg
General
Richard A. Cody
(born 1950)
July 24, 2004July 31, 20084 years, 7 daysRetired, 2008 Peter J. Schoomaker
George W. Casey Jr.
32
GEN Peter W Chiarelli.jpg
General
Peter W. Chiarelli
(born 1950)
August 4, 2008January 31, 20123 years, 180 daysRetired, 2012 George W. Casey Jr.
Martin E. Dempsey
Raymond T. Odierno
33
General Lloyd Austin III.jpg
General
Lloyd J. Austin III
(born 1953)
January 31, 2012March 8, 20131 year, 36 daysCommander, United States Central Command (2013–2016)
Retired, 2016
Secretary of Defense (2021–)
Raymond T. Odierno
34
Campbell 2013 2.jpg
General
John F. Campbell [6]
(born 1957)
March 8, 2013August 8, 20141 year, 153 daysCommander, International Security Assistance ForceAfghanistan (2014–2016)
Retired, 2016
Raymond T. Odierno
35
Gen. Allyn 2014 2.jpg
General
Daniel B. Allyn [8]
(born 1959)
August 15, 2014June 16, 20172 years, 305 daysRetired, 2017 Raymond T. Odierno
Mark A. Milley
36
Gen. James C. McConville.jpg
General
James C. McConville [10]
(born 1959)
June 16, 2017July 26, 20192 years, 40 daysChief of Staff (2019–) Mark A. Milley
37
Gen Joseph M Martin 37th VCSA (1).jpg
General
Joseph M. Martin
(born 1962)
July 26, 2019Incumbent2 years, 49 days Mark A. Milley
James C. McConville

See also

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References

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  6. http://www.defense.gov/video/default.aspx?videoid=354460
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