Combat Service Identification Badge

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Example of Combat Service Identification Badges for the 10th Mountain Division, 82nd Airborne Division and 101st Airborne Division Combat-Service-Identification-Badges.jpg
Example of Combat Service Identification Badges for the 10th Mountain Division, 82nd Airborne Division and 101st Airborne Division

The Combat Service Identification Badge (CSIB) is a metallic heraldic device worn on the right side of the United States Army's Army Service Uniform that uniquely identifies a soldier's combat service with major U.S. Army formations.

Contents

Description

CSIB are silver or gold-colored metal and enamel devices that are 2 inches (5.08 cm) in height consisting of a design similar to the unit Shoulder Sleeve Insignia (SSI). [1]

Wear

The Combat Service Identification Badge is worn on the lower right pocket for male soldiers and on the right side parallel to the waistline for female soldiers. Soldiers can wear the CSIB on the new blue Army Service Uniform, Class A and Class B. The CSIB cannot be worn on the Army Combat Uniform (ACU) or the discontinued Army Green Uniform. U.S. soldiers will continue to wear the subdued Shoulder Sleeve Insignia-Former Wartime Service on their right sleeve of the ACU blouse to denote combat service. The Shoulder Sleeve Insignia-Former Wartime Service was also worn on the Army Green "Class A" Uniform, until that uniform was discontinued in 2015. [2] The CSIB is ranked fifth in the order of precedence for identification badges. [3]

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References

  1. Combat Service Identification Badge United States Army, Retrieved 25 January 2011.
  2. Jahner, Kyle (1 October 2015). "The end of the Green Service Uniform: 1954–2015". Army Times. Retrieved 3 July 2017.
  3. AR 670-1, para 29-18. See the ALARACT Message # 202-2008 paragraph 11 for further clarification.