Military Horseman Identification Badge

Last updated
Military Horseman Identification Badge
US Army Military Horseman Identification Badge.png
TypeBadge
Awarded forLead riders within the 3rd U.S. Infantry Regiment
Presented by United States Army
EligibilityServing in the Caisson Platoon of the 3rd U.S. Infantry Regiment
StatusCurrently awarded
EstablishedJuly 18, 2017 (retroactive to February 1, 2013)
First awardedSeptember 29, 2017
Last awardedOngoing
Total110 (as of 23 August 2021) [1]
Precedence
Next (higher) Driver and Mechanic Badge [2]
Related Identification badges [2]
Soldiers assigned to the Caisson Platoon, 1st Battalion, 3rd Infantry Regiment, were awarded the first Military Horseman Identification Badge, during a ceremony in Conmy Hall, Joint Base Myer-Henderson Hall, September 29, 2017. Military Horseman Identification Badge (worn).jpg
Soldiers assigned to the Caisson Platoon, 1st Battalion, 3rd Infantry Regiment, were awarded the first Military Horseman Identification Badge, during a ceremony in Conmy Hall, Joint Base Myer-Henderson Hall, September 29, 2017.

The Military Horseman Identification Badge recognizes United States Army soldiers who complete the nine-week Basic Horsemanship Course and serve as a lead rider on the Caisson team within the 3rd U.S. Infantry Regiment (The Old Guard). The badge was first awarded on September 29, 2017, to soldiers during a ceremony held at Joint Base Myer-Henderson Hall, Virginia. [3]

The Military Horseman Identification Badge is authorized by the Commander, 3rd U.S. Infantry Regiment (The Old Guard) as a permanent part of the uniform for personnel who meet the following criteria: [4]

a. Successfully complete the nine week Basic Horsemanship Course.
b. Complete 100 Armed Forces Full Honors Funerals in Arlington National Cemetery.
c. Served honorably for a minimum of nine months, which need not be continuous, while assigned as a member of the U.S. Army Caisson Platoon, 3rd U.S. Infantry Regiment (The Old Guard).
d. Be recommended by the Commander, 1st Battalion, 3rd U.S. Infantry Regiment (The Old Guard).

Temporary wear of the Military Horseman Identification Badge may be authorized prior to serving the required nine months with the recommendation of the Commander, [4]

1st Battalion, 3rd U.S. Infantry Regiment (The Old Guard) and approval by Commander,
3rd U.S. Infantry Regiment (The Old Guard) provided all other criteria have been met.

Soldiers reassigned from authorized positions within the U.S. Army Caisson Platoon prior to completion of nine months' service may be considered for permanent award on a case-by-case basis by the Commander, 3rd U.S. Infantry Regiment (The Old Guard). [4]

The Military Horseman Identification Badge is only awarded for those soldiers serving in the Caisson Platoon of the 3rd U.S. Infantry Regiment. It will not be awarded to soldiers serving in other positions with horse detachments or platoons. [4]

The Military Horseman Identification Badge will be worn after the Guard, Tomb of the Unknown Soldier Identification Badge and before the Drill Sergeant Identification Badge. Additional guidance on wear of the identification badges can be found in DA Pam 670-1, paragraph 20-17a.

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References

  1. #CaissonWeek (video), 3rd U.S. Infantry Regiment (The Old Guard) official Facebook post, dated 23 August 2021, last accessed 26 August 2021
  2. 1 2 "Department of the Army Pamphlet 670–1, Uniform and Insignia Guide to the Wear and Appearance of Army Uniforms and Insignia", Department of the Army, dated 26 January 2021, last accessed 24 September 2022
  3. 1 2 The Military Horseman Identification Badge (Image 4 of 5), DVIDS, by SPC Gabriel Silva, dated 29 September 2017, last accessed 2 October 2017
  4. 1 2 3 4 MILPER Message 17-217 Proponent AHRC-PDP-A, Establishment of the Military Horseman Identification Badge, Department of the Army, ncosupport.com, dated 18 July 2017, last accessed 9 August 2017