Guard, Tomb of the Unknown Soldier Identification Badge

Last updated
Guard, Tomb of the Unknown Soldier Identification Badge
TombUN.gif
Type Military badge
Presented by United States Army
EligibilityMembers of the Honor Guard at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier
StatusCurrently awarded
EstablishedFebruary 7, 1958
Total688 [1]
Related Military Horseman Identification Badge
Sentinels conduct "change of the guard" ceremony at the Tomb of the Unknowns, circa 2005 Tomb of the Unknown Soldiers.jpg
Sentinels conduct "change of the guard" ceremony at the Tomb of the Unknowns, circa 2005

The Guard, Tomb of the Unknown Soldier Identification Badge is a military badge of the United States Army which honors those soldiers who have been chosen to serve as members of the Honor Guard, known as "Sentinels", at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. [2] [3] It is the third-least awarded badge in the US Military, after the Military Horseman Identification Badge and the Astronaut Badge. [4] As of August 2021, 688 soldiers have been awarded this badge. [1]

Contents

Design

The badge itself is made of heavy sterling silver approximately two inches in diameter. The obverse design consists of an inverted wreath, a sign of mourning, and the East face of the Tomb which contains the figures of Peace, Valor and Victory. Superimposed on the bottom of the Tomb under the three figures are the words "Honor Guard". [5]

The badge was designed in 1956 and first issued to members of the Honor Guard at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier on February 7, 1958. The badge was first issued only as a temporary wear item, meaning the Soldiers could only wear the badge during their tenure as members of the Honor Guard. Upon leaving the duty, the badge was returned and reissued to incoming Soldiers. In 1963, regulations were changed to allow the badge to be worn as a permanent part of the military uniform after the Soldier's completion of duty at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. It was also permanently awarded to those who had previously earned it. [6]

Award process

The bestowing authority of the Guard, Tomb of the Unknown Soldier Identification Badge is the Commanding Officer, 4th Battalion, 3rd U.S. Infantry in accordance with Army Regulation 600-8-22. [6] For a service member to permanently receive the badge, they must serve nine months as a member of the Honor Guard and receive a recommendation from the Commanding Officer of the Honor Guard Company. [7] [5] [8] [9]

The Guard, Tomb of the Unknown Soldier Identification Badge can be revoked if a Soldier disgraces him or herself in a manner that brings dishonor on the Tomb. This action can happen even after the Soldier completes his or her tour as a member of the Honor Guard. [6] [10]

Recipients

The first recipient of this badge was William Daniel, a former prisoner of war who served as a tomb sentinel and sergeant of the guard at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier from February 1957 to June 1960. He retired with the rank of Master Sergeant in 1965 after 22 years of Army service. Daniel died in 2009 and is interred in Section 35 at Arlington National Cemetery, located just south of the Tomb. [4]

Women were not eligible to receive the badge until a woman in a military police unit was assigned to The Old Guard in 1993, thus enabling women to volunteer for guard duty at the Tomb. The first female soldier to earn the badge was Sgt. Heather Lynn Johnsen.

Related Research Articles

Tomb of the Unknown Soldier (Arlington) Monument dedicated to U.S. service members who have died without their remains being identified

The Tomb of the Unknown Soldier is a historic monument dedicated to deceased U.S. service members whose remains have not been identified. It is located in Arlington National Cemetery in Virginia, United States. The World War I "Unknown" is a recipient of the Medal of Honor, the Victoria Cross, and several other foreign nations' highest service awards. The U.S. Unknowns who were interred are also recipients of the Medal of Honor, presented by U.S. presidents who presided over their funerals. The monument has no officially designated name.

Foot guards Senior infantry regiments in some militaries

In some militaries, foot guards are senior infantry regiments. Foot guards are commonly responsible for guarding royal families or other state leaders, and they also often perform ceremonial duties accordingly, but at the same time are combat soldiers.

Combat Infantryman Badge United States Army decoration

The Combat Infantryman Badge (CIB) is a United States Army military decoration. The badge is awarded to infantrymen and Special Forces soldiers in the rank of colonel and below, who fought in active ground combat while assigned as members of either an Infantry or Special Forces unit of brigade size or smaller at any time after 6 December 1941. For those soldiers who are not members of an infantry, or Special Forces unit, the Combat Action Badge (CAB) is awarded instead. For soldiers with an MOS in the medical field with the exception of a Special Forces Medical Sergeant (18D), the Combat Medical Badge is awarded.

The Expert Infantryman Badge, or EIB, is a special skills badge of the United States Army.

Coast Guard Honor Guard Badge

The Coast Guard Honor Guard Badge is a qualification badge of the United States Coast Guard which recognizes those personnel who are/have been permanently assigned to the Ceremonial Honor Guard Unit at the U.S. Coast Guard Telecommunications and Information Systems Command (TISCOM), Alexandria, Virginia. The badge was inspired by the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier Guard Identification Badge.

Uniform Service Recruiter Badges (United States)

The Recruiter Badge is a decoration of the United States uniformed services that is awarded to personnel who have performed recruitment duties as service recruiters. The Recruiter Badge is issued by every branch of the U.S. uniform services except for the Marine Corps and the NOAA Commissioned Corps. With the exception of the U.S. Army, a Recruiting Service Ribbon is also awarded to those personnel who have completed successful tours as recruiters.

U.S. military instructor badges

The U.S. military issues instructor badges to specially training military personnel who are charged with teaching military recruits the skills they need to perform as members of the U.S. Armed Forces or teach continuing education courses for noncommissioned officers and officers in the military. With the exception of the U.S. Army and U.S. Coast Guard, these badges are considered temporary military decorations and must be surrendered upon completion of one's duty as a military instructor. Because of this, the U.S. Air Force, U.S. Navy, and U.S. Marine Corps award Drill Instructor Ribbons as a permanent decoration to recognize service members who have qualified and performed as military instructors.

Parachutist Badge (United States) Award

The Parachutist Badge, also commonly referred to as "Jump Wings" is a military badge of the United States Armed Forces. The United States Space Force and United States Coast Guard are the only branches that do not award the Parachutist Badge, but their members are authorized to receive the Parachutist Badges of other services in accordance with their prescribed requirements. The DoD military services are all awarded the same Basic Parachutist Badge. The U.S. Army and U.S. Air Force issue the same Senior and Master Parachutist Badges while the U.S. Navy and U.S. Marine Corps issue the Navy and Marine Corps Parachutist Badge to advanced parachutists. The majority of the services earn their Basic Parachutist Badge through the U.S. Army Airborne School.

Identification badges of the Uniform Services of the United States List of identification badges of the US Uniformed Services

Identification badges of the Uniformed Services of the United States are insignia worn by service members conducting special duties, many of which can be awarded as permanent decorations if those duties are performed successfully. There are a few identification badges that are awarded to all services, others are specific to a uniform service. The Office of the President and Vice President and department/service headquarters badges are permanent decorations for those who successfully serve in those assignments. Some of the service level identification badges can be permanent decorations and others are only worn by a service member while performing specific duties, such as the Military Police Badge.

Badges of the United States Army Military decorations issued by the United States Department of the Army

Badges of the United States Army are military decorations issued by the United States Department of the Army to soldiers who achieve a variety of qualifications and accomplishments while serving on active and reserve duty in the United States Army.

Badges of the United States Air Force Military badges of the U.S. Air Force

Badges of the United States Air Force are specific uniform insignia authorized by the United States Air Force that signify aeronautical ratings, special skills, career field qualifications, and serve as identification devices for personnel occupying certain assignments.

Obsolete badges of the United States military U.S. military badges no longer in use

Obsolete badges of the United States military are a number of U.S. military insignia which were issued in the 20th and 21st centuries. After World War II many badges were phased out of the United States Armed Forces in favor of more modern military badges which are used today.

Badges of the United States Marine Corps Military badges of the U.S. Marine Corps

Insignia and badges of the United States Marine Corps are military "badges" issued by the United States Department of the Navy to Marines who achieve certain qualifications and accomplishments while serving on both active and reserve duty in the United States Marine Corps.

United States Army branch insignia

In the United States Army, soldiers may wear insignia to denote membership in a particular area of military specialism and series of functional areas. Army branch insignia is similar to the line officer and staff corps officer devices of the U.S. Navy as well as to the Navy enlisted rating badges. The Medical, Nurse, Dental, Veterinary, Medical Service, Medical Specialist, Chaplains, and Judge Advocate General's Corps are considered "special branches", while the others are "basic branches".

The uniforms of the United States Army distinguish soldiers from other service members. U.S. Army uniform designs have historically been influenced by British and French military traditions, as well as contemporary U.S. civilian fashion trends. The two primary uniforms of the modern U.S. Army are the Army Combat Uniform, used in operational environments, and the Army Green Service Uniform worn during everyday professional wear and during formal and ceremonial occasions that do not warrant the wear of the more formal blue service uniform.

Rams Head Device Award

The Ram's Head Device is a military special skill badge of the U.S. Army National Guard. The Ram's Head Device is awarded to any soldier after completion of the Army Mountain Warfare School (AMWS), based at the Ethan Allen Firing Range in Jericho, Vermont. The badge is authorized for wear on the uniform of Vermont National Guard soldiers and those Army National Guard units belonging to the 86th Infantry Brigade Combat Team (Mountain) from other states, such as:

Tabs of the United States Army American Army insignia

In the United States Army, tabs are cloth and/or metal arches displaying a word or words signifying a special skill that are worn on U.S. Army uniforms. On the Army Combat Uniform and Army Service Uniform, the tabs are worn above a unit's Shoulder Sleeve Insignia (SSI) and are used to identify a unit's or a soldier's special skill(s) or are worn as part of a unit's SSI as part of its unique heritage. Individual tabs are also worn as small metal arches above or below medals or ribbons on dress uniforms.

Military Horseman Identification Badge Award

The Military Horseman Identification Badge recognizes United States Army soldiers who complete the nine-week Basic Horsemanship Course and serve as a lead rider on the Caisson team within the 3rd U.S. Infantry Regiment. The badge was first awarded on September 29, 2017, to soldiers during a ceremony held at Joint Base Myer-Henderson Hall, Virginia.

Danyell Elaine Wilson is a former U.S. Army soldier and former member of the 3rd U.S. Infantry Regiment, best known as the prestigious "The Old Guard” or Honor Guard Company sentinel of Company E, 4th Battalion.

Heather Lynn Johnsen is a former U.S. Army soldier and former member of the 3rd U.S. Infantry Regiment, best known as the highly prestigious "The Old Guard" or Honor Guard Company sentinel of Company E, 4th Battalion.

References

  1. 1 2 "Society of the Honor Guard, Tomb of the Unknown Soldier "Tomb Guard" list".
  2. U.S. Army Pamphlet 670–1: Uniform and Insignia, Guide to the Wear and Appearance of Army Uniforms and Insignia Archived 2014-05-06 at the Wayback Machine , Department of the Army Publications and Forms, dated 31 March 2014, last accessed 23 June 2014
  3. U.S. Army Regulation 600-8-22, Military Awards, Official Department of the Army Publications and Forms, dated 11 Dec 06, revised 15 Sep 11, last accessed 4 Oct 11
  4. 1 2 McVeigh, Alex (February 11, 2009). "First Tomb Badge recipient laid to rest". Pentagram. McLean, VA: U.S. Army. Retrieved February 22, 2010.
  5. 1 2 "The Sentinels of the Tomb". 3rd U.S. Army Infantry Regiment. Archived from the original on 2010-02-28. Retrieved February 22, 2010.
  6. 1 2 3 "Sec. 578.110 Guard, Tomb of the Unknown Soldier Identification Badge". Code of Federal Regulations, Title 32, Volume 3. U.S. Government Printing Office. January 1, 2008. Retrieved February 22, 2010.
  7. Zongker, Brett (February 19, 2010). "For 1st time, brothers guard Tomb of the Unknown". The Washington Post. Associated Press. Retrieved February 22, 2010.[ dead link ]
  8. Fogg, Sam (May 29, 1977). "Guards Walk Extra Mile At Tomb Of Unknown". The Pittsburgh Press. United Press International. p. H1. Retrieved February 22, 2010.
  9. "Tomb guard thinks first of his duty". Lawrence Journal-World. N.Y. Times News Service. May 31, 1985. p. 5. Retrieved February 22, 2010.
  10. Popplewell, Louise (June 11, 2006). "Tomb of the Unknowns". Victoria Advocate. Retrieved February 22, 2010.[ dead link ]