Space Operations Badge

Last updated
Space Operations Badge (USAF/USSF)
Space Badge (USA)
Basic Space Badge.jpg
TypeOccupational badge (USAF/USSF) [1] [2]
Special skills badge (USA) [3]
Awarded forSpace operations [1] [2] [4]
Presented by Department of the Air Force, and Department of the Army
StatusCurrently awarded [1] [4]
First awardedNovember 2005 [5]
Precedence
Next (higher)U.S. Army – Aviator badges [4]
EquivalentU.S. Air Force – Aeronautical, cyber, and missile badges [1]
Next (lower)U.S. Army – Driver and Mechanic Badge [4]
U.S. Air Force – Occupational badges [1]

The Space Operations Badge is an occupational badge for guardians of the United States Space Force [6] [2] and space airmen of the United States Air Force [1] while the United States Army (USA) version of the badge, known as the Space Badge, is a special skills badge for soldiers who qualify as space professionals. [4]

Contents

History

Space and Missile Badge

USAF - Occupational Badge - Space and Missile.svg
USAF - Occupational Badge - Senior Space and Missile.jpg
USAF - Occupational Badge - Master Space and Missile.jpg
Former Basic, Senior, and Master Space and Missile Badges

The Air Force Space and Missile Badge (AFSMB) was a military badge of the United States Air Force which was awarded to airmen who completed space operations and missile training. It initially replaced the Missile Badge when the space and missile operations fields were merged. However, the Missile Badge was reinstated in 2009, and the space and missile careers were split in 2013. [1] [7] [8]

The Air Force Space and Missile Badge was presented in three grades being that of basic, senior, and master. The basic badge was awarded for completion of initial space training while the senior and master badges were awarded based on years of service in Air Force Space assignments; for officer the steps occur at seven and fifteen years respectively. For enlisted personnel the senior badge was awarded upon attaining a "7 skill level" and the master badge as a Master Sergeant or above with five years in the specialty from award of the senior badge. The grades of the Air Force Space and Missile badge were denoted by a star (senior) and wreath (master) centered above the decoration. [1]

The Space and Missile Badge was also awarded to U.S. Army officers who graduated from the functional area 40A (Army Space Operations Officer) course, becoming the first Air Force badge awarded by another service. [9] [10] [11] [12] [3]

Space Operations Badge

Space Operations Badges (USAF and USSF)
Space Badges (USA)
Top-to-bottom: Basic, Senior, and Master/Command USAF - Space Professional Badges.png
Space Operations Badges (USAF and USSF)
Space Badges (USA)
Top-to-bottom: Basic, Senior, and Master/Command

In 2004, the commander of U.S. Air Force Space Command, General Lance Lord, USAF, announced the introduction of the new Air Force Space Badge (AFSB), which replaced the Air Force Space and Missile Badge. The new badge was also awarded to U.S. Air Force scientists, engineers, communications, intelligence, and acquisition professionals who had performed space or missile operations, intelligence, and acquisition duties and had successfully completed the Space 100 course. [1] [5] [13] [14]

In 2006, the U.S. Army, with the consent of the Air Force, authorized the awarding of the Air Force Space Badge to Army personnel who meet specific guidelines for training and time in a space billet. On 19 October 2006, SGT Daniel Holscher, a satellite control operations noncommissioned officer with U.S. Army Central Space Support Element, was the first enlisted soldier to earn the Air Force Space Badge. [15]

In February 2011, the U.S. Air Force and U.S. Army officially approved the establishment of the Air Force Space Badge as a joint Air Force and Army badge; thus, the words "Air Force" were dropped from the official name of the badge. U.S. Army soldiers can be awarded the Space Badge after attending Air Force or Army space or satellite systems courses and have 12 months (for Active Army) or 24 months (for Army Reserve and Army National Guard) experience in a space billet. This new badge is also awarded to graduates of the FA-40A Army Space Operations Officer course. [10] [12] [16]

In January 2014, General William L. Shelton, commander of Air Force Space Command, ordered the renaming of the Space Badge to the Space Operations Badge for the Air Force and changed the criteria for eligibility. The Space Operations Badge was then restricted to Air Force Specialty Codes 13S and 1C6, but can be earned by non-operations personnel after meeting certain criteria. For airman to now earn the Space Operations Badge, members must have completed three years of operations-focused duties and receive Air Force Space Command vice commander approval. To receive the Senior Space Operations Badge, members must complete seven years of operations-focused duties and get AFSPC vice commander approval. After completion of 15 years of operations-focused duties and AFSPC vice commander approval, airmen are eligible for the Command Space Operations Badge. [17] [18]

In 2019 and 2020 the Space Operations Badge was awarded to non-U.S. military members for the first time. [6] [19] In 2019 four Royal Canadian Air Force airmen assigned to the Combined Space Operations Center successfully completed U.S. Air Force space training and were awarded the Space Operations Badge, [19] while in 2020 a Royal Air Force airman assigned to the 18th Space Control Squadron was the first United Kingdom citizen to earn the same. [6]

Official heraldry of the Space Operations Badge: "The central globe represents the Earth as viewed from space, the Earth being the origin and control point for man's space endeavors. The global lines of latitude and longitude hearken to the original 20th Air Force patch and emphasize the global nature of the Air Force space mission. The thrusts and vectors behind the globe represent the dynamic and infinite space environment. The deltoid symbolizes the Air Force’s upward thrust into space, the reentry vehicles of our intercontinental ballistic missile force and the launch vehicles that place satellites in orbit. The ellipses represent orbital paths traced by satellites in Earth orbit; the satellites symbolically depicted as four-pointed stars. The symmetric placement of the satellites signifies the Air Force's worldwide coverage in accomplishing its mission." [20]

The badge is informally referred to as "space wings" due to the resemblance to other aeronautical badges or "wings". [2] [21] [22]

See also

Related Research Articles

<span class="mw-page-title-main">United States Air Force</span> Air service branch of the United States Armed Forces

The United States Air Force (USAF) is the air service branch of the United States Armed Forces, and is one of the eight uniformed services of the United States. Originally created on August 1, 1907 as a part of the United States Army Signal Corps, the USAF was established as a separate branch of the United States Armed Forces in 1947 with the enactment of the National Security Act of 1947. It is the second youngest branch of the United States Armed Forces and the fourth in order of precedence. The United States Air Force articulates its core missions as air supremacy, global integrated intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance, rapid global mobility, global strike, and command and control.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">United States Astronaut Badge</span> US military award badge for space flight

The United States Astronaut Badge is a badge of the United States, awarded to military and civilian personnel who have completed training and performed a successful spaceflight. A variation of the astronaut badge is also issued to civilians who are employed with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration as specialists on spaceflight missions. It is the least-awarded qualification badge of the United States military.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Air Assault Badge</span> Award

The Air Assault Badge is awarded by the U.S. Army for successful completion of the Air Assault School. The course includes three phases of instruction involving U.S. Army rotary wing aircraft: combat air assault operations; rigging and slingloading operations; and rappelling from a helicopter.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Parachute Rigger Badge</span> Award

The Parachute Rigger Badge is a military qualification badge of the United States Army and the United States Air Force which was first created in 1948 and officially approved in June 1986. The award is intended as a badge for enlisted, warrant officer and officer personnel who have successfully completed parachute rigger courses specified by the U.S. Army Quartermaster Center and School.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Uniform Service Diver Insignia (United States)</span> Qualification badges of the uniformed services of the USA

The diver insignia are qualification badges of the uniformed services of the United States which are awarded to servicemen qualified as divers. Originally, the diver insignia was a cloth patch decoration worn by United States Navy divers in the upper-portion of the enlisted service uniform's left sleeve during the first part of World War II, when the rating insignia was worn on the right sleeve. When enlisted rating insignia were shifted to the left sleeve in late World War II, the patch shifted to the upper right sleeve. The diving patch was created during World War II, and became a breast insignia in the late 1960s.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Military Freefall Parachutist Badge</span> Award

The Military Freefall Parachutist Badge is a military badge of the United States Army and United States Air Force awarded to qualified U.S. Army and U.S. Air Force personnel as high-altitude military parachute specialists.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Uniform Service Recruiter Badges (United States)</span>

The Recruiter Badge is a decoration of the United States uniformed services that is awarded to personnel who have performed recruitment duties as service recruiters. The Recruiter Badge is issued by every branch of the U.S. uniform services except for the Marine Corps and the NOAA Commissioned Corps. With the exception of the U.S. Army, a Recruiting Service Ribbon is also awarded to those personnel who have completed successful tours as recruiters.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">U.S. military instructor badges</span>

The U.S. military issues instructor badges to specially training military personnel who are charged with teaching military recruits the skills they need to perform as members of the U.S. Armed Forces or teach continuing education courses for noncommissioned officers and officers in the military. With the exception of the U.S. Army and U.S. Coast Guard, these badges are considered temporary military decorations and must be surrendered upon completion of one's duty as a military instructor. Because of this, the U.S. Air Force, U.S. Navy, and U.S. Marine Corps award Drill Instructor Ribbons as a permanent decoration to recognize service members who have qualified and performed as military instructors.

The Missile Badge is a military decoration of the United States Air Force which was first created on 23 May 1958. The "pocket rocket" badge recognizes those commissioned officers and enlisted personnel of the US Air Force who have qualified as missile personnel that have been trained in the maintenance or launching of land-based and air-launched nuclear weapons under the direction of the National Command Authority. Originally known as the Missileman Badge, the Missile Badge later became known as the Missileer Badge or more informally the Pocket Rocket and is still often referred to by this name.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Parachutist Badge (United States)</span> Award

The Parachutist Badge, also commonly referred to as "Jump Wings" is a military badge of the United States Armed Forces. The United States Space Force and United States Coast Guard are the only branches that do not award the Parachutist Badge, but their members are authorized to receive the Parachutist Badges of other services in accordance with their prescribed requirements. The DoD military services are all awarded the same Basic Parachutist Badge. The U.S. Army and U.S. Air Force issue the same Senior and Master Parachutist Badges while the U.S. Navy and U.S. Marine Corps issue the Navy and Marine Corps Parachutist Badge to advanced parachutists. The majority of the services earn their Basic Parachutist Badge through the U.S. Army Airborne School.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Identification badges of the Uniform Services of the United States</span> List of identification badges of the US Uniformed Services

Identification badges of the Uniformed Services of the United States are insignia worn by service members conducting special duties, many of which can be awarded as permanent decorations if those duties are performed successfully. There are a few identification badges that are awarded to all services, others are specific to a uniform service. The Office of the President and Vice President and department/service headquarters badges are permanent decorations for those who successfully serve in those assignments. Some of the service level identification badges can be permanent decorations and others are only worn by a service member while performing specific duties, such as the Military Police Badge.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Badges of the United States Navy</span> Military badges of the US Navy

Insignias and badges of the United States Navy are military badges issued by the United States Department of the Navy to naval service members who achieve certain qualifications and accomplishments while serving on both active and reserve duty in the United States Navy. Most naval aviation insignia are also permitted for wear on uniforms of the United States Marine Corps.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Badges of the United States Air Force</span> Military badges of the U.S. Air Force

Badges of the United States Air Force are specific uniform insignia authorized by the United States Air Force that signify aeronautical ratings, special skills, career field qualifications, and serve as identification devices for personnel occupying certain assignments.

The Aircrew Badge, commonly known as Wings, is a qualification badge of the United States military that is awarded by all five branches of armed services to personnel who serve as aircrew members on board military aircraft. The badge is intended to recognize the training and qualifications required by aircrew of military aircraft. In order to qualify as an aircrew member and receive the Aircrew Badge, such personnel typically undergo advanced training in aircraft in-flight support roles.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Lance W. Lord</span> United States Air Force general

General Lance W. Lord is a retired four-star general in the United States Air Force who served as Commander of Air Force Space Command at Peterson Air Force Base in Colorado.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Uniforms of the United States Air Force</span> Standardized military uniforms worn by airmen of the United States Air Force

The uniforms of the United States Air Force are the standardized military uniforms worn by airmen of the United States Air Force to distinguish themselves from the other services.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">United States Space Force</span> Space service branch of the United States Armed Forces

The United States Space Force (USSF) is the space service branch of the U.S. Armed Forces, one of the eight U.S. uniformed services, and the world's only independent space force. Along with its sister branch, the U.S. Air Force, the Space Force is part of the Department of the Air Force, one of the three civilian-led military departments within the Department of Defense. The Space Force, through the Department of the Air Force, is overseen by the secretary of the Air Force, a civilian political appointee who reports to the secretary of defense, and is appointed by the president with Senate confirmation. The military head of the Space Force is the chief of space operations who is typically the most senior Space Force officer. The chief of space operations exercises supervision over the Space Force's units and serves as one of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Badges of the United States Space Force</span> Military badges of the U.S. Space Force

Badges of the United States Space Force are specific uniform paraphernalia authorized by the United States Space Force that signify ratings, special skills, career field qualifications, and serve as identification devices for personnel occupying certain assignments. Space Force occupational badges are awarded in three degrees or skill levels. Badges for space operations are awarded at basic, senior, and command levels; other occupational badges are issued in basic, senior, and master level. A star and wreath system, worn above the badge, denotes which degree or skill level a service member currently holds.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Douglas Schiess</span> U.S. Space Force general

Douglas Andrew Schiess is a United States Space Force major general who serves as the commander of Combined Force Space Component Command and vice commander of Space Operations Command. He previously served as the deputy commanding general (operations) of the Space Operations Command. He has also commanded the 45th Space Wing, the 21st Space Wing, the 45th Operations Group, and the 4th Space Operations Squadron of the U.S. Air Force. In July 2021, Schiess was nominated for transfer to the United States Space Force and promotion to major general. Schiess transferred from the Air Force to the Space Force on 28 April 2022.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Structure of the United States Space Force</span> Structure of the U.S. Space Force

The United States Space Force is organized by different units: the Space Staff, the field commands, and the space deltas.

References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Department of the Air Force Instruction 36-2903: Dress and Personal Appearance of Air Force Personnel, dated 12 April 2022, last accessed 29 August 2022
  2. 1 2 3 4 533d Training Squadron-USSF, EUST 20-014 Graduation, 533rd Training Squadron, U.S. Space Force, hosted on Facebook, dated 23 September 2020, last accessed 24 September 2020
  3. 1 2 3 4 Department of the Army Pamphlet 670–1, Uniform and Insignia, Guide to the Wear and Appearance of Army Uniforms and Insignia, Headquarters Department of the Army, dated 26 January 2021, last accessed 29 August 2022
  4. 1 2 3 4 5 Army Regulation 600-8-22, Military Awards, U.S. Army, dated 5 March 2019, last accessed 2 February 2020
  5. 1 2 New space badge wear begins today, U.S. Air Force, dated 1 November 2005 last accessed 1 January 2018
  6. 1 2 3 4 18 SPCS certifies first United Kingdom operator, by Kristen Allen, Peterson-Schriever Garrison Public Affairs, dated 7 August 2020, last accessed 25 September 2020
  7. Officials bring back missile badges, wings, Posted 6/6/2008
  8. AF splits space, missile career field for officers, Air Force Space Command website, by Secretary of the Air Force Public Affairs, dated 15 February 2013, last accessed 2 February 2020
  9. FA-40 Space Operations Graduation Ceremony, U.S. Army Space & Missile Defense Command website, accessed 1 Feb 12
  10. 1 2 SMDC-OPZ-FB, ASPDO Procedural Guide #1 - Procedures for Awarding the Space Badge to Army Space Cadre Personnel Archived 2012-03-20 at the Wayback Machine , dated 15 February 2011
  11. The Army Space Cadre: Space Professionals (FA40) and Space Enablers, U.S. Army, STAND-TO!, dated 28 September 2010, last accessed 1 March 2014
  12. 1 2 Fact Sheet, ASCO/FA40 PPO, U.S. Army Space Cadre Office, Functional Area 40 Space Operations Personnel Proponent Office, last accessed 1 March 2014
  13. Air Force Instruction 36-3701: Space Professional Development Program, U.S. Air Force, dated 20 May 2010, last accessed 18 June 2014
  14. Officials unveil new space badge, Posted 10/7/2004
  15. Army Sergeant first to receive Air Force Space Badge, Blackanthem Military News, posted 27 Oct 07, accessed 1 Feb 12
  16. Space Badge recognizes warriors of the high ground, Army.mil, posted 21 Apr 11, accessed 1 Feb 12
  17. Space badge renamed, new guidance issued, U.S. Air Force News, by Master Sgt. Kevin Williams, dated 11 December 2013, last accessed 31 December 2013
  18. Space warriors earn Space Badges, army.mil, by Jason B. Cutshaw (USASMDC/ARSTRAT), dated 21 March 2014, last accessed 22 October 2016
  19. 1 2 Canadian space operators certified, awarded space wings in CSpOC, Air Force Space Command, by Major Cody Chiles (14th Air Force Public Affairs), dated 25 January 2019, last accessed 2 February 2020
  20. AFSC 1C6X1 SPACE SYSTEMS OPERATIONS, CAREER FIELD EDUCATION AND TRAINING PLAN, Department of the Air Force, dated 12 May 2016, last accessed 26 December 2020. PD-icon.svgThis article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain .
  21. New Air Force cyberspace badge guidelines released, comment posted 4/29/2010 3:42:09 AM ET U.S. Air Force Official Website, posted 27 April 2010, accessed 8 April 2012
  22. AF Computer Warriors Get Wings. Seriously., christianfighterpilot.com, posted 29 April 2010, accessed 8 April 2012