Parachutist Badge (United States)

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Parachutist Badge
US Army Airborne basic parachutist badge.gif
Basic Parachutist Badge
TypeBadge
Awarded forAirborne training course
Presented by United States Armed Forces
StatusCurrently awarded
Last awardedCurrently awarded
Total awarded posthumously86
Army Precedence
Next (higher) Expert Field Medical Badge
Next (lower) Parachute Rigger Badge [1]
US Army Airborne senior parachutist badge.gif
Senior Parachutist Badge
US Army Airborne master parachutist badge.gif
Master Parachutist Badge
U.S. Navy and U.S. Marine Corps Parachutist Insignia-redone.png
Navy & Marine Corps Parachutist Insignia

The Parachutist Badge, also commonly referred to as "Jump Wings" is a military badge of the United States Armed Forces. The United States Space Force and United States Coast Guard are the only branches that do not award the Parachutist Badge, but their members are authorized to receive the Parachutist Badges of other services in accordance with their prescribed requirements. The DoD military services are all awarded the same Basic Parachutist Badge. The U.S. Army and U.S. Air Force issue the same Senior and Master Parachutist Badges while the U.S. Navy and U.S. Marine Corps issue the Navy and Marine Corps Parachutist Badge to advanced parachutists. The majority of the services earn their Basic Parachutist Badge through the U.S. Army Airborne School.

Contents

Army

The Army's Basic Parachutist Badge is awarded to all military personnel of any service who complete the US Army Basic Airborne Course at Fort Benning, Georgia. It signifies that the soldier is a trained military parachutist, and is qualified to participate in airborne operations. The badge and its sew-on equivalent may be worn on the Army Combat Uniform (ACU). [2]

Original sketch for the U.S. Army Parachutist Badge, by William P. Yarborough (Patent #134963) Original sketch of the US Army Parachutist Badge-1941.jpg
Original sketch for the U.S. Army Parachutist Badge, by William P. Yarborough (Patent #134963)

The original Army Parachutist Badge was designed in 1941 by Captain (later Lieutenant General) William P. Yarborough and approved by the Department of War in March of that year. The Parachutist Badge replaced the "Parachutist Patch" which had previously been worn as a large patch on the side of a paratrooper's garrison cap. LTG Yarborough also designed the Senior and Master Parachutist Badges and the addition of stars to portray the number of combat jumps. The airborne background trimming that is worn behind the badge of those assigned to airborne units is also a contribution of William P. Yarborough. [3]

The Senior and Master Parachutist Badges were authorized in 1949. [4]

Basic Parachutist Badge

To be eligible for award of the basic Parachutist Badge, an individual must have completed the Basic Airborne Course of the Airborne School of the United States Army Infantry School at Fort Benning, Georgia. To graduate, a student must complete the three-phase course consisting of a ground phase, a tower phase, and a jump phase. By the end of the course, a student will have completed five jumps in varying jump configurations, from a "no load" jump all the way to a full combat load jump at night. [1]

Senior Parachutist Badge

To be eligible for the Senior Parachutist Badge, an individual must have been rated excellent in character and efficiency and have met the following requirements:

  1. Participated in a minimum of 30 jumps including fifteen jumps with combat equipment to consist of normal TOE equipment including individual weapon carried in combat whether the jump was in actual or simulated combat. In cases of simulated combat the equipment will include water, rations (actual or dummy), ammunition (actual or dummy), and other essential items necessary to sustain an individual in combat. Two night jumps must also be made during the hours of darkness (regardless of time of day with respect to sunset) one of which will be as jumpmaster of a stick. In addition, two mass tactical jumps which culminate in an airborne assault problem with either a unit equivalent to a battalion or larger; a separate company battery; or an organic staff of regimental size or larger. The soldier must fill a position commensurate with his or her rank or grade during the problem.
  2. Either graduated from the Jumpmaster Course of the Airborne Department of the Infantry School or from the Jumpmaster School of a separate airborne battalion or larger airborne unit, or infantry divisions and separate infantry brigades containing organic airborne elements (e.g. the United States Army Alaska (USARAK) or the United States Army Special Operations Command (USASOC) Jumpmaster Course), or served as jumpmaster on one or more combat jumps or as a jumpmaster on 15 noncombat jumps.
  3. Have served on jump status with an airborne unit or other organizations authorized parachutists for a total of at least 24 months. [1]

Master Parachutist Badge

To be eligible for the Master Parachutist Badge, an individual must have been rated excellent in character and efficiency and have met the following requirements:

  1. Participated in a minimum of 65 jumps including twenty-five jumps with combat equipment to consist of normal TOE equipment, including individual weapon carried by the individual in combat whether the jump was in actual or simulated combat. In cases of simulated combat the equipment will include water rations (actual or dummy), ammunition (actual or dummy), and other essential items necessary to sustain an individual in combat. Four night jumps must also be made during the hours of darkness, one as jumpmaster of a stick. Five mass tactical jumps must be made which culminate in an airborne assault problem with a unit equivalent to a battalion or larger; a separate company/battery; or an organic staff of regimental size or larger. The individual must fill a position commensurate with their rank or grade during the problem.
  2. Either graduated from the Jumpmaster Course of the Airborne Department of the Infantry School or the Jumpmaster School of a separate airborne battalion or larger airborne unit, or infantry divisions and separate infantry brigades containing organic airborne elements, including the U.S. Army Alaska Jumpmaster Course, or served as jumpmaster on one or more combat jumps or as jumpmaster on 33 noncombat jumps.
  3. Have served on jump status with an airborne unit or other organization authorized parachutists for a total of 36 months (may be non-consecutive).

The 25 combat equipment jumps necessary to qualify for the Master Parachutist Badge must be from a static line. [1]

The master parachutist badge is 1+12 inches (38 mm) wide at the widest part of the wings and 1+1364 inches (31 mm) from the top of the wreath to the bottom of the parachute where the risers meet in a point.

Accoutrements

A Parachutist Badge from a WW2 veteran with the 506th Parachute Infantry--as indicated by the airborne background trimming--who made two combat jumps--as indicated by the two combat jump devices on the badge. AmericanArmyUniformPatchWorldWarII JumpWings.jpg
A Parachutist Badge from a WW2 veteran with the 506th Parachute Infantry—as indicated by the airborne background trimming—who made two combat jumps—as indicated by the two combat jump devices on the badge.

Soldiers assigned to Army units on airborne status wear a cloth oval airborne background trimming underneath their Parachutist Badge, which are uniquely designed for each airborne unit. [5] [6] This is one method by which an individual can identify a parachute qualified soldier serving in a unit on active jump status, called a "Paratrooper," versus a parachutist serving in a non-airborne unit. The original airborne background trimming was also a contribution of Captain Yarborough who attempted to address a concern that the Parachutist Badge was too small and did not stand out on the uniform. [5] Today, each unit's airborne background trimming design is created and approved by The Institute of Heraldry who evaluate unit lineage, military heraldry, as well as proposed designs by the requesting unit. [7]

If a soldier completes an airborne jump into a combat zone, they are authorized to wear a combat jump device on their Parachutist Badge turning it into what is officially called a Combat Parachutist Badge. The device consists of a star or arrangements of stars, indicating the number of combat jumps (up to five) conducted by the paratrooper. [8] The use of stars as combat jump devices did not gain official approval until after the 1983 invasion of Grenada (Operation Urgent Fury). The stars are awarded as follows: [9] [10]

US Army Master Parachutist Badges with Combat Jump Devices.png
1 combat jumpA bronze star on the shroud lines
2 combat jumpsA bronze star on each wing
3 combat jumpsA bronze star on each wing and one on the shroud lines
4 combat jumpsTwo bronze stars on each wing
5 + combat jumpsA large gold star on the shroud lines
List of known U.S. combat parachute jumps [11] [12] [13] [14] [15] [16]
DateUnitOperationTroopersCountryDropzone
8 November 1942509th Parachute Infantry Battalion (PIB) Torch 556AlgeriaTafaraoui airfield, La Senia
15 November 1942509th PIBTorch300–350AlgeriaYouks les Bains
24 December 1942509th PIB, Hdqt's. Co. Two French paratroopers32TunisiaEl Djem
9 July 1943504th Parachute Infantry Regiment 3rd Battalion (Jumped first); 505th Regimental Combat Team (RCT), Includes: 505th PIR, 456th PFA & Co. B, 307th Engr. Husky I3,406ItalyGela, Sicily
10 July 1943504th Regimental Combat Team (RCT), Includes: 504th PIR, 1st & 2nd Btn.; 376th PFA & Co.A, 307th Engr.Husky II2,304ItalyGela, Sicily
5 September 1943503th PIR1,700New GuineaNadzab, Markham Valley
13 September 1943504th Regimental Combat Team (RCT) Includes: 504th PIR, 376th PFA & Co. "A" 307th Eng. Avalanche 1,300ItalyPaestum, Salerno
14 September 1943505th Regimental Combat Team (RCT). Includes: 505th PIR, 456th PFA & Co.B 370th Engr.Avalanche2,105ItalySalerno, Paestum
14 September 1943509th PIBAvalanche640ItalyAvellino
6 June 194482nd Airborne Division (507, 508) 505th RCT, Includes: 505th Parachute Infantry Reg., Co. B/307 Engineer Battalion and 456th Parachute Field Artillery Battalion. 28 Pathfinders, 504th PIR, (7 returned). Overlord, Titanic (Dropping of parachute dummies, "Oscar").6,418FranceNormandy
6 June 1944101st Airborne Division [326, 377, 501, 502, 506]Overlord, Titanic (Dropping of parachute dummies, "Oscar").6,638FranceNormandy
3 July 1944503rd PRCT, 1st Bn. Table Tennis 739New GuineaNoemfoor Island
4 July 1944503rd PRCT, 3rd Bn.Table Tennis685New GuineaNoemfoor Island
15 August 19441st Abn. Task Force (460th PFA, 463rd PFABn.; 509th PIB; 517th PCT; 551st PIB; 596th PCEng. Co.) Dragoon 5,607FranceCote d' Azur, Riviera
17 September 194482nd Airborne Division (508), 505th RCT, Includes: 505th PIR, 456th PFA, & Co.B, 307th Engr.; 504th RCT, Includes: 504th PIR, 376th PFA, & Co.A, 307 Engr Market Garden 7,250NetherlandsGrave & Nijmegen
17 September 1944101st Airborne Division [501, 502, 506]Market Garden6,769NetherlandsEindhoven
29 November 1944, 5 December 1944Co.C, 127th Abn.Eng, Bn. Co.C., 1st Pl.., 187th P/GIR 221st AB. Med. Co.; 457th PFA 11th Abn. Div. Hdqt's Group 511th Pcht. Signal Co. 11th Abn. Div. RECON Pl. Tabletop 241LeyteManarawat
3 February 1945511th PIR, 457th FABn.Shoestring1,830PhilippinesTagaytay Ridge
16 February 1945503rd PRCT, 462nd PFABn; 161st Airborne Engr. Btn.Topside2,050PhilippinesCorregidor
23 February 1945511th Parachute Infantry Regiment: 1st Btn., Co.B; Hdqt's Co., 1st Btn.; Hdqt's Co., 1st Btn., Light Machine Gun PlatoonRescue 2,147 internees130PhilippinesLos Banos Prison Camp
24 March 194517th Airborne Division (507 PIR, 513 PIR, 464 PFA, 466 PFA, 139 AEB, 224 AMC, 155 AAB, 411 AQM, 517 ASC, 680 GFA 681 GFA, 717 AOC & 194 GIR). Also small units: MP's, Division Artillery, Reconnaissance Platoon, & Parachute Maintenance Co.Varsity4,964GermanyWesel
23 June 1945511th PIRGypsy1,030PhilippinesAparri
20 October 1950187th ARCT, 2nd BattalionDZ Easy1,203KoreaSukchon
20 October 1950187th ARCT, 1st, 3rd. Bn's.DZ William1,470KoreaSukchon
21 October 1950187th Airborne Regimental Combat Team (ARCT).DZ William671KoreaSukchon
23 March 1951187th ARCT, 2nd & 3rd Bns; 674th ABN Field Artillery Bn; 2nd & 4th ABN Ranger Cos, and Indian army surgical team.Tomahawk3,486KoreaMunsan-Ni
12 February 1962FTT-1 White Star SF TeamNam Beng Valley Campaign vs. Pathet Lao12LaosNam Tha airstrip
2 January 1963Joint General Staff reserve ARVN Paratroopers with U.S. MACV "Red Hat" Advisors from SaigonAp Bac300 South Vietnamese, 2 AmericansSouth VietnamAp Tan Thoi
22 February 1967173rd Airborne Brigade, 503rd P.I.R., 2nd & 3rd Btl's,; 3/319 Airborne Field Artillery Regiment (AFAR).Junction City845VietnamKatum
2 April 19675th Special Force Group (ABN), 1st Special Forces: Detachments, A-503 Mike Force & A-344, Operation Harvest Moon (Includes Montagnards)Harvest Moon356 (includes Montagnards)VietnamBunard, Phouc Long "Happy Dragon" Province
5 September 1967USMC, 1st Long Range Reconnaissance Patrol (LRRP) Oregon 10VietnamSouth
5 October 19675th Special Force Group (ABN), 1st Special Forces: Pathfinder Detachment (12 SF, 37 ARVN Pathfinders), "B" Co II CTZ (Pleiku) Mike Force (50 SF) & 275 LLDB (Includes Montagnards)Blue Max374VietnamBu Prang CIDG fighting camp, Quang Duc "Great Virtue" Province
1968-73? Military Assistance Command, Vietnam – Studies and Observations Group (MACV-SOG) Airborne Studies Group (SOG 36)Eldest Son, Italian Green, Pole BeanNorth Vietnam, Laos, Cambodia
28 November 1970Recon Team Florida, CCN, MACV-SOG (High Altitude Low Opening [HALO])3 Americans, one ARVN officer and 2 MontagnardsLaosNVA road inside Laos
7 May 1971Captain Larry Manes' Recon Team, CCN, MACV-SOG (HALO)4 AmericansSouth VietnamBetween Ashau Valley and Khe Sanh, NVA trail extension of Laotian Highway 921
22 June 1971Sergeant Major Billy Waugh's Recon Team, CCN, MACV-SOG (HALO)4 AmericansSouth Vietnam60 miles SW of Danang
22 September 1971Captain Jim Storter's Recon Team, CCC, MACV-SOG (HALO)4 AmericansSouth VietnamPlei Trap Valley, NW of Pleiku
11 October 1971Sgt. 1st Class Dick Gross' Recon Team, CCC, MACV-SOG (HALO)5 AmericansVietnam25 miles, SW of Pleiku in the Ia Drang Valley
23 October 1983Navy SEAL Team and USAF CCTUrgent Fury15GrenadaPort Salines
25 October 198375th Ranger Regiment LRS Detachment, 82nd Abn Div. combat controllers (CCT), Air Force Special Operations Command (AFSOC), 12 troopers; 4 troopers, 1st Bn, tactical air control parties (TACP).Urgent Fury16(?)GrenadaPoint Salines
25 October 1983Navy SEAL TeamUrgent Fury11GrenadaGovernor's residence
25 October 198375th Ranger Regiment 1st and 2nd Bns; and two paratroopers (SGT Spain and SPC Richardson from 307th Engineer Bn)Urgent Fury500GrenadaPoint Salines airfield
20 December 1989UNIT: (0100) Rangers, 75th Ranger Regiment; 82nd Airborne Division Ready BrigadeJust Cause4,000PanamaRio Hato east to Fort Cimarron
20 December 1989(0124) Rangers; (0145) 82nd Abn. Div., 1st Brigade Task Force: 1/504th PIR, 1/505th PIR; 2nd Bn., 504th PIR; 4th Bn., 325th Abn. Inf. Reg., Co. B and C; A Co., 3/505 PIR; 3rd Bn., 73rd Abn. Armor Reg.; 82nd Abn. MP Co., 3 platoons (0411). All joined to form: Task Force Pacific.Just Cause2,176PanamaTorrijos-Tocumen Airport
15 January 1991Special Forces Operational Detachment-Delta (HAHO)Desert Storm12IraqNorthwest desert
Dec. 1991Navy SEAL Team 6Raw DealHaitiNavassa Island
19 October 200175th Ranger RegimentOperation Enduring Freedom200AfghanistanObjective Rhino at Dry Lake Airstrip
13 November 200175th Ranger Regiment, 3rd BattalionOperation Enduring FreedomAfghanistanIn the vicinity of Alimarden Kan-E-Bagat
25 February 200375th Ranger Regiment, 2nd Battalion; 504th Infantry, 3rd BattalionOperation Enduring FreedomAfghanistanNear Chahar Borjak, Nimruz Province
24 March 200375th Ranger Regiment, 3rd Battalion; 24th Special Tactics SquadronOperation Iraqi FreedomIraqNorthwestern desert region of Iraq, in the vicinity of Al Qaim
26 March 2003173rd Airborne BrigadeOperation Iraqi Freedom954IraqBashur Drop zone
28-29 Mar 200327th Engineer Battalion; 75th Ranger Regiment, 3rd Battalion; 75th Ranger Regiment, 3rd Battalion; 24th Special Tactics SquadronOperation Iraqi FreedomIraqAt H1 Airfield
3 July 200475th Ranger Regiment, Regimental Reconnaissance Detachment (HALO)Operation Enduring FreedomAfghanistanSoutheastern Region
31 July 2004USMC 1st Reconnaissance Battalion (HAHO)Operation Iraqi Freedom6IraqNear Baghdad
30 May 200710th Special Forces Group, 3rd Battalion, ODA 074 (HALO)Operation Iraqi Freedom11IraqNinewah Province
11 July 2009 75th Ranger Regiment, Regimental Reconnaissance Company, Team 1Operation Enduring FreedomAfghanistan
25 January 2012Navy DEVGRU (SEAL Team 6)Hostage RescueSomalia
31 October 2020Navy DEVGRU (SEAL Team 6)Hostage Rescue30Nigeria

Air Force

Like the Army, the Air Force issues the same parachutist badges in the same three degrees (Basic, Senior, & Master) but have different criteria for the awarding of these badges. The level of degree is determined by the number of jumps the wearer has successfully completed, years of service on jump status, and other requirements as specified by AFI 11-402, Aviation and Parachutist Service, Aeronautical Ratings and Badges. [17] Additionally Airmen who have earned the Parachutist Badge while serving as members of a sister branch then transferred to the U.S. Air Force are allowed to continue wear of the badge without having to requalify. [18]

USAF Parachutist Badge-Historical.png
Basic Badge
USAF Senior Parachutist Badge-Historical.png
Senior Badge
USAF Master Parachutist Badge-Historical.png
Master Badge

In 1956 the Air Force began issuing a unique Basic, Senior, and Master Parachutist Badges. These parachutist badges were modeled after the Air Force's Medical Badges. Due to popular demand, the Air Force decided to revert to issuing the Army style parachutist badges in 1963. [19]

Basic Parachutist Badge

The Basic Parachutist Badge may be awarded following completion of basic parachute training through a designated Air Force Air-Ground Training Program. Air Force personnel generally earn the basic parachutist badge either through the Army's Airborne School at Fort Benning, or the United States Air Force Academy's AM-490 freefall parachute training course taught by AETC's 98th Flying Training Squadron. [17]

Senior Parachutist Badge

The Senior Parachutist Badge consists of the Basic Parachutist Badge with a star atop the parachute. Awarded for 30 static line jumps with a minimum of 24 months of cumulative time on jump status. The 30 jumps must include: (1) Two jumps during the hours of darkness; (2) Fifteen jumps with operational equipment IAW AFI 11-410; (3) Actually perform one night jump as a Primary JM (PJM); and (4) Seven jumps performing as PJM. [20]

Master Parachutist Badge

The Master Parachutist Insignia consists of the Senior Parachutist Badge with a star centered within the wreath. Awarded for 65 static line jumps with a minimum of 36 months of cumulative time on jump status. The 65 jumps must include: (1) Four jumps during the hours of darkness; (2) Twenty-five jumps with operational equipment IAW AFI 11-410; (3) Two night jumps performing PJM duties; and (4) Fifteen jumps performing as PJM. [20]

The United States Navy and Marine Corps issue parachutist insignia in two degrees: the U.S. Military Basic Parachutist Badge, also called the Basic Parachutist Insignia (the same badge that's awarded to all DoD military services), and the Navy and Marine Corps Parachutist Insignia. Parachutist insignia is available to personnel who perform qualifying airborne jumps as a: [21] [22]

Training is accomplished by successful completion of the prescribed course of instruction while attending the: [21] [22]

Basic Parachutist Insignia

The right to wear the Basic Parachutist Insignia is based on the completion of prescribed training defined in OPNAVINST 3501.225 and MCO 3120.11: [22]

When a US Navy enlisted member initially qualifies as a static line parachutist, an entry shall be made on NAVPERS 1070/613 (commonly referred to as a "Page 13" entry) of the US Navy enlisted service record indicating the date of qualification, type(s) of aircraft in which qualified, and unit at which the training was received. Navy enlisted members are authorized the parachutist (PJ) designator added to their rating. [22]

A qualified static-line parachute jumper who successfully completes the prescribed program of instruction while attending a formal, interservice training facility including a minimum of 10 military free-fall parachute jumps, at least 2 of which must have been conducted carrying full combat equipment (1 day/1 night), may qualify. Navy enlisted members are authorized the military free-fall parachutist (FPJ) designator added to their rating. [22]

When a US Navy officer initially qualifies as a static line parachutist, the additional qualification designator (AQD) of BT1 will be entered into the officer's record by their detailer (NAVPERS). Free-fall qualification will result in an AQD of BT2. [22]

For both Static Line and Military Free Fall Parachutist qualified personnel, a service record entry shall also indicate whether or not the member is HALO-qualified. [22]

The Basic Parachutist Badge is a prerequisite for the Special Warfare Badge since parachutist training is an integral part of the Navy's Basic Underwater Demolition/SEAL (BUD/S) program. SEAL personnel generally do not wear the Basic badge once they earn their Special Warfare insignia, but will wear their Navy and Marine Corps Parachutist Badge in addition to the Special Warfare Badge, the latter nicknamed the "Budweiser" badge. Navy EOD technicians are generally also jump qualified with a number of them also being qualified in military free-fall (HALO/HAHO). Currently, due to a recent change, newly pinned Navy EOD technicians are required to attend the U.S. Army's Basic Airborne School upon graduation. As well, a number of SWCC personnel earn Basic Parachutist badges in conjunction with their assignment to a Special Boat Team detachment that uses the Maritime Craft Air Delivery System (MCADS). This enables them to drop small watercraft and their crews from C-130 aircraft. [22]

The Navy and Marine Corps Parachutist Insignia (originally issued as Navy Parachute Rigger wings) is a gold-colored embroidered or metal insignia depicting an open parachute with outstretched wings. It is authorized for officers and enlisted personnel who were awarded the Basic Parachutist Insignia and, under competent orders, have completed a minimum of five additional static-line or P3 jumps, to include: (1) combat equipment day jump, two (2) combat equipment night jumps, and employ at least two (2) different types of military aircraft. [22]

The U.S. Navy and Marine Corps Parachutist badge was originally known as the U.S. Navy Certified Parachute Rigger badge and designed by American Insignia Company in 1942 for graduates of the U.S. Navy Parachute Rigger School. During WWII, despite being against uniform regulations it became common for U.S. Marine Corps paratroopers who were issued the silver U.S. Army Basic Parachutist badge to wear the gold Navy Certified Parachute Rigger badge because they believed the gold "Rigger wings" looked better on their uniform. [23] This out of regulations wearing of the Parachute Rigger badge became so common that in July 1963, the Commander of United States Marine Corps Force Reconnaissance Bruce F. Meyers sent a request to the Chief of Naval Operations Admiral George W. Anderson Jr. via Marine Corps Commandant General David M. Shoup requesting to officially make the Navy Parachute Rigger badge the parachutist badge for the Navy and Marine Corps. The request was approved by Admiral Anderson on 12 July 1963 per BuPers Notice 1020. [24] Originally the badge was worn upon graduation from Navy PR school, but since 1963 being a certified parachute rigger, survival equipmentman, and graduate of the U.S. Navy Parachute Rigger is no longer a requirement to earn the badge. Currently, the Navy and Marine Corps Parachutist Insignia only requires the completion of the minimum five additional jumps in a jump billet, but service members can request to attend Navy Parachute Rigger School for further training and specialized occupational duties such as Special Operations Parachute Rigger (SOPR) who work within Navy SEAL teams and Naval Special Warfare and explosive ordnance disposal (EOD) units throughout the world.

Military Freefall Parachutist Badges

USAF - Occupational Badge - High Altitude Low Opening.svg
Military Freefall Parachutist Badge
US Military Master Free Fall Parachutist Badge.jpg
Master Military Freefall Parachutist Badge

Qualified Army and Air Force personnel may go on to earn the Military Freefall Parachutist Badge in special operations training for High Altitude Low Opening (HALO) and High Altitude High Opening (HAHO) jumps. HALO/HAHO training is conducted by the John F. Kennedy Special Warfare Center and School of the US Army Special Operations Command, on behalf of the US Special Operations Command. It is awarded in two degrees: Basic and Master. To earn the basic badge, the jumper must have graduated from Army Airborne School and the Military Free-Fall Parachutist Course. [25] To earn the master badge, jumpers must have graduated from Army Airborne School, Army Jumpmaster School, Military Free-Fall Parachutist Course, and the Military Free-Fall Jumpmaster Course. [26]

As with the Army's Parachutist Badges, Army parachutists that have earned one of the Military Freefall Parachutist Badges are also eligible to earn Combat Jump Devices. [1] [10] [14]

See also

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The United States Army Pathfinder School trains personnel in the U.S. Army and its sister services to set up parachute drop zones and helicopter landing zones for airborne and air assault missions.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">United States Army Jumpmaster School</span> Military unit

The United States Army Jumpmaster School trains personnel in the skills necessary to jumpmaster a combat-equipped jump and the proper attaching, jumping, and releasing of combat and individual equipment while participating in an actual jump that is proficient in the duties and responsibilities of the Jumpmaster and Safety; procedures for rigging individual equipment containers and door bundles; personnel parachute components by their specific nomenclature and characteristics; procedures and standards required to conduct a JumpMaster Personnel Inspection (JMPI); the duties and responsibilities of the Drop Zone Safety Officer; the presentation of the Jumpmaster briefing and sustained airborne training (SAT); and the execution of the duties of a Jumpmaster and Safety from a USAF aircraft during a day/night combat equipment jump.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Parachutist Badge (United Kingdom)</span> Award

The British Armed Forces award a range of Parachutist Badges to those qualified as military parachutists. The version awarded depends largely on the unit or role that the individual fills following qualification.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Aircrew survival equipmentman</span>

Aircrew survival equipmentmen are survival equipment specialists and certified parachute riggers who oversee valuable life saving equipment, parachutes, and other special gear used by U.S. Naval and Marine Corps special operations forces, Naval Air Department, and the United States Navy Parachute Team known as the "Leap Frogs". They perform a wide range of duties, which include inspecting, maintaining, and repairing parachutes, search and rescue equipment, along with survival kits, medical kits, flight clothing, protective wear, night vision equipment, aircrew oxygen systems, liquid oxygen converters, anti-exposure suits, and g-suits. PRs operate and maintain carbon dioxide transfer and recharge equipment, operate and repair sewing machines as well as train aircrew and other personnel in parachute rigging and the use of safety and survival equipment.

The Namibian Special Forces is a special operations command of the Namibian Defence Force responsible for special forces and special operations capable units. The command consists of Army commandos, Army Airborne paratroopers and the Marine Corps amphibious special operations unit. The Army commandos specialize in airborne and land borne insertion while the Marine Corps amphibious special operations unit specialize in small-unit maritime operations that originate from a river, ocean, swamp and delta. The army units receive training assistance from former South African Special Forces (Recces) and the marine corps from the Brazilian Marine Corps. The units regularly participate in Southern African Development Community (SADC) special forces exercises.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Marine Special Operator Insignia</span> Award

The Marine Special Operator Insignia is a badge of the United States Marine Corps. The insignia is awarded to individuals who have completed the MARSOC Individual Training Course, and for those Marines who, before the insignia's 2016 introduction, hold the military occupational specialties (MOS) of 0372 critical skills operator or 0370 special operations officer.

References

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