Special Forces Tab

Last updated
Special Forces Tab
SpecialForcesTabMetal.jpg Special Forces Tab Cloth.jpg Special Forces Tab - OCP.png
1st: Miniature metallic badge variant
2nd: Army Service Uniform variant
3rd: Army Combat Uniform variant
TypeTab
Awarded forGraduation from the Special Forces Qualification Course
Presented by United States Army
StatusCurrently awarded
Established1983
Last awardedCurrent
Precedence
Next (higher)None
Next (lower) Ranger Tab [1]

The Special Forces Tab is a service school qualification tab of the United States Army, awarded to any soldier completing the Special Forces Qualification Course [1] at the U.S. Army John F. Kennedy Special Warfare Center and School, Fort Bragg, North Carolina. Soldiers who are awarded the Special Forces Tab are authorized to wear it and the green beret for the remainder of their military careers, even when not serving in a Special Forces command. [1] [2]

Contents

Because it is longer than the other qualification tabs, it is called the "Long Tab". Personnel who have earned it are nicknamed "Long Tabbers."

Description and history

The Special Forces Tab was created in 1983 and is an embroidered quadrant patch worn on the upper left sleeve of a military uniform. The cloth tab is 314 inches wide, 3/4-inch high, and is teal blue with gold-yellow embroidered letters. A metal Special Forces Badge is authorized for wear on mess dress and class-B uniforms. The metal badge is teal blue with a gold edge and gold letters. [3]

At the time of its creation, the Special Forces Tab was retroactively awarded to any Army soldiers previously Special Forces-qualified. In addition, as set forth in Army regulations, veterans of certain categories of former wartime service are also eligible for retroactive awards of the tab. Among these are: [1]

A non-special operations qualified paratrooper with the 11th Special Forces Group wearing green beret with 1st Special Forces DUI and unit recognition bar, c. 1967 SP4 Keith Campbell-11th SFG-KIA 1967.jpg
A non-special operations qualified paratrooper with the 11th Special Forces Group wearing green beret with 1st Special Forces DUI and unit recognition bar, c. 1967

Before creation of the Special Forces Tab, Special Forces status was indicated by wearing a full-size unit flash on the green beret. A support soldier (military intelligence soldiers, signal personnel, logistics specialists, parachute riggers, clerical and administrative personnel, etc.) assigned to a Special Forces unit wore a 1/4" high bar recognition bar (nicknamed a "half flash," "striker bar," or "candy stripe") below the Special Forces Distinctive Unit Insignia (DUI) on their green beret. The bar matched the colors of the unit's flash. [5] [6] [7] This was not, however, the norm during the Vietnam war, when all soldiers assigned to 5th Special Forces wore "full flashes." After the creation of the tab in 1983 and until January 1993, all personnel in a Special Forces unit wore the same beret and flash. Today, only Special Forces-qualified soldiers may wear the green beret, making obsolete the unit striker bar under the flash. Each Special Forces Group has its own unique beret flash, which is worn by all members assigned to the unit; Special Forces-qualified soldiers wear it on the green beret while support personnel wear it on the maroon beret.

Award Eligibility

Award eligibility as follows: [8] [9]

Other tabs

The Special Forces Tab is one of four permanent individual skill/marksmanship tabs (as compared to a badge) authorized for wear by the U.S. Army. In order of precedence on the uniform, they are the President's Hundred Tab, the Special Forces Tab, the Ranger Tab, and the Sapper Tab. [1] Only three may be worn at one time. [2]

See also

Notes

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 "Army Regulation 600-8-22 Military Awards" (PDF). Department of the Army. 5 March 2019. Archived from the original (PDF) on 12 May 2022.
  2. 1 2 "Guide to the Wear and Appearance of Army Uniforms and Insignia Pamphlet 670–1" (PDF). Department of the Army. 25 May 2017. Archived from the original (PDF) on 11 September 2017. Retrieved 2022-08-28.
  3. "U.S. Army Quartermaster Museum: Special Forces Tab". U.S. Army Quartermaster Museum . Archived from the original on 10 May 2000. U.S. Army Quartermaster Museum: Special Forces Tab
  4. "Keith Allen Campbell". Virtual Wall Vietnam Veterans Memorial. Archived from the original on 22 February 2001.
  5. Rottman, Gordon L. (1985). US Army Special Forces, 1952-84. London: Bloomsbury Publishing. ISBN   978-1-78200-446-2. OCLC   813846700.{{cite book}}: CS1 maint: date and year (link)
  6. "Wear and appearance of Army uniforms and insignia AR 670-1 1981". Department of the Army. 1981. Archived from the original on 27 March 2019.
  7. "ENLISTED ASSIGNMENTS AND UTILIZATION MANAGEMENT AR 614-200" (PDF). Department of the Army. 25 January 2019. Archived from the original (PDF) on 12 August 2022.
  8. "Tabs Special Forces Tab". The Institute of Heraldry . Archived from the original on 13 June 2020.PD-icon.svgThis article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain .
  9. "Military Awards AR 600–8–22" (PDF). Department of the Army. 5 March 2019. Archived from the original (PDF) on 21 July 2019.PD-icon.svgThis article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain .

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