Achievement Medal

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Achievement Medal
Achievement.jpg
Five different versions of the Achievement Medal are awarded: one for Joint Service, Army, Air Force, Navy and Marine Corps, and the Coast Guard
Awarded by United States Armed Forces
TypeMedal (decoration)
EligibilityMilitary personnel only
Awarded for"Meritorious service or achievement in either combat or noncombat situations based on sustained performance or specific achievement of a superlative nature but which does not warrant a Commendation Medal or higher."
StatusCurrently awarded
Statistics
EstablishedU.S. Navy and U.S. Marine Corps (1961)
U.S. Coast Guard (1963)
U.S. Army (1981)
U.S. Air Force (1981)
U.S. Joint Service (1983)
Precedence
Next (higher) Commendation Medals
Next (lower)Navy and Marine Corps: Combat Action Ribbon
Army: Prisoner of War Medal
Air Force: Combat Action Medal
Coast Guard: Commandant's Letter of Commendation Ribbon
Us jointservachiev rib.svg   Army Achievement Medal ribbon.svg
Air Force Achievement ribbon.svg   Navy and Marine Corps Achievement ribbon.svg   U.S. Coast Guard Achievement Medal ribbon.svg
Service ribbons for the Joint Service, Army, Air Force, Navy and Marine Corps, and Coast Guard Achievement Medals

The Achievement Medal is a military decoration of the United States Armed Forces. The Achievement Medal was first proposed as a means to recognize the contributions of junior officers[ citation needed ] and enlisted personnel who were not eligible to receive the higher Commendation Medal or the Meritorious Service Medal.

Contents

Each military service issues its own version of the Achievement Medal, with a fifth version authorized by the U.S. Department of Defense for joint military activity. The Achievement Medal is awarded for outstanding achievement or meritorious service not of a nature that would otherwise warrant awarding the Commendation Medal. Award authority rests with local commanders, granting a broad discretion of when and for what action the Achievement Medal may be awarded.[ citation needed ]

History

The Navy and Marine Corps ribbon bar of the Achievement Medal with "V" device denoting combat bravery. The "V" device ceased being awarded with Achievement Medals in late 2016. Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal ribbon with "V" device, 3rd award.svg
The Navy and Marine Corps ribbon bar of the Achievement Medal with "V" device denoting combat bravery. The "V" device ceased being awarded with Achievement Medals in late 2016.

U.S. Navy and U.S. Marine Corps

The Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal (NAM), is the United States Navy and U.S. Marine Corps' version of the Achievement Medal. The U.S. Navy was the first branch of the U.S. Armed Forces to award such a medal, doing so in 1961, when it was dubbed the "Secretary of the Navy Commendation for Achievement Medal". This title was shortened in 1967 to simply, the "Navy Achievement Medal". On 19 August 1994, to recognize those of the United States Marine Corps who had received the Navy Achievement Medal, the name of the decoration was officially changed to the "Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal". The award is still often referred to in shorthand speech as the "Navy Achievement Medal" or "NAM" for short.

Chain of Command approval

From its inception in the early 1960s to 2002, the Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal could not be approved by the commanding officers of ships, submarines, aviation squadron, or shore activities who held the rank of Commander (O-5). Awards for crewmembers had to be submitted to the Commodore or Air Wing Commander or the first appropriate O-6 in the chain of command for approval, who then signed the award and returned it. This led to a dramatically lower awarding rate when compared to similar size units in the Army or Air Force awarding their own achievement medals, especially considering that those services did not establish their respective achievement medals until the 1980s. Since 2002 the commanding officers of aviation squadrons and ships have had the authority to award NAMs without submission to higher authority. [1] For the Army, battalion commanders (or the first O-5 in a soldier's chain of command for the Army Achievement Medal).

U.S. Coast Guard, U.S. Army and U.S. Air Force

The United States Coast Guard created its own Achievement Medal in 1967; the U.S. Army and U.S. Air Force issued their own versions of the award with the Army Achievement Medal in 1981 [2] and Air Force Achievement Medal in 1980. [3] Effective 11 September 2001, the Army Achievement Medal may be awarded in a combat area. [4] Since this change over sixty thousand Army Achievement Medals have been awarded in theaters of operations such as Iraq and Afghanistan. [5]

Joint Service Achievement Medal

The Joint Service Achievement Medal was created in 1983. [6] [7] This award was considered a Department of Defense decoration senior to the service department Achievement Medals.

Ribbon devices

The following devices may be authorized to be worn on the following achievement medals suspension ribbon and service ribbon:

Former ribbon devices

The following ribbon devices were authorized in the past but have now been discontinued: [9]

See also

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References

  1. SECNAVINST 1650.1H - NAVY AND MARINE CORPS AWARDS MANUAL (PDF) (Report). United States Navy. August 22, 2006. p. 13. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2010-09-18. Retrieved 10 October 2016.
  2. "Error". pentagon.mil. Archived from the original on 2012-01-21. Retrieved 2011-05-20.
  3. 1 2 "Factsheets : Air Force Achievement Medal". af.mil. Archived from the original on 2011-06-16. Retrieved 2011-05-28.
  4. "Army Achievement Medal". edocket.access.gpo.gov.
  5. Awards and Decorations Statistics by Conflict, Operation or Incident Archived August 15, 2011, at the Wayback Machine
  6. "Error". pentagon.mil. Archived from the original on 2011-03-03. Retrieved 2011-05-28.
  7. "Factsheets : Joint Service Achievement Medal". af.mil. Archived from the original on 2012-02-07. Retrieved 2011-12-07.
  8. deGrandpre, Andrew; Panzino, Charlsy (30 March 2017). "12 military awards now eligible for new 'C' and 'R' devices, and 2 no longer rate a 'V'". Military Times. Virginia. Retrieved 17 March 2018.
    Dickstein, Corey (31 March 2017). "Pentagon implements 'C' and 'R' awards devices, removes 'V' from 2 awards". Stars and Stripes. Washington, D.C. Retrieved 17 March 2018.
  9. 1 2 3 "Pentagon implements 'C' and 'R' awards devices, removes 'V' from 2 awards".
  10. 1 2 3 Levine, Peter (21 December 2016). "Section 3: Award Requirements and Restrictions" (PDF). DoD Instruction 1348.33: DoD Military Decoretions and Awards Program. Office of the Under Secretary of Defense for Personnel and Readiness. p. 13. Archived from the original (PDF) on 27 April 2017. Retrieved 27 April 2017. Includes Army Achievement Medal, Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal, and Air Force Achievement Medal.