Afghanistan Campaign Medal

Last updated
Afghanistan Campaign Medal
Afghanistan Campaign Medal.png
TypeCampaign medal
Awarded forService in Afghanistan from October 24, 2001 to August 31, 2021.
Presented bythe U.S. Department of Defense [1] and Department of Homeland Security [2]
EligibilityU.S. military personnel
StatusInactive
Established EO 13363, November 29, 2004;18 years ago (2004-11-29)
First awardedJune 2005 (retroactive to October 24, 2001)
Afghanistan Campaign Medal ribbon.svg

Streamer AFGCS.PNG
Precedence
Next (higher) Kosovo Campaign Medal [3]
Next (lower) Iraq Campaign Medal [3]
Related Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary Medal
NATO Medal

The Afghanistan Campaign Medal (ACM) is a military award of the United States Armed Forces which was created by Executive Order 13363 of President George W. Bush on November 29, 2004, and became available for general distribution in June 2005. [4] [5] The medal was designed by the U.S. Army Institute of Heraldry. [6] [7]

Contents

The Afghanistan Campaign Medal is awarded to any member of the United States military who has performed duty within the borders of Afghanistan (or its airspace) for a period of thirty consecutive days or sixty non-consecutive days. The medal is retroactive to October 24, 2001, and was active until the conclusion of Operation Allies Refuge on August 31, 2021. [8] Personnel who have been engaged in combat with an enemy force, or personnel who have been wounded in combat within Afghanistan, may receive the ACM regardless of the number of days spent within the country. The medal was also awarded posthumously to any service member who died in the line of duty within Afghanistan, including from non-combat injuries such as accidents and mishaps. [9] [10]

Campaign phases and devices

The following are the approved campaign phases and respective dates for the Afghanistan Campaign Medal: [11] [12] [13] [14] [15]

PhaseFromTo
Liberation of AfghanistanSeptember 11, 2001November 30, 2001
Consolidation IDecember 1, 2001September 30, 2006
Consolidation IIOctober 1, 2006November 30, 2009
Consolidation IIIDecember 1, 2009June 30, 2011
Transition IJuly 1, 2011December 31, 2014
Transition II (Note 1)January 1, 2015August 31, 2021
Note 1: For Operation FREEDOM's SENTINEL pursuant to USD(P&R)
memorandum dated February 13, 2015, titled, "Afghanistan Campaign Medal –
Operation FREEDOM’s SENTINEL and Transition II Campaign Phase."

Examples of campaign stars worn on the Afghanistan Campaign Medal service ribbon:

Bronze-service-star-3d-vector.svg
Afghanistan Campaign Medal ribbon.svg
One of the six phases
Bronze-service-star-3d-vector.svg
Bronze-service-star-3d-vector.svg
Afghanistan Campaign Medal ribbon.svg
Two of the six phases
Bronze-service-star-3d-vector.svg
Bronze-service-star-3d-vector.svg
Bronze-service-star-3d-vector.svg
Afghanistan Campaign Medal ribbon.svg
Three of the six phases
Bronze-service-star-3d-vector.svg
Bronze-service-star-3d-vector.svg
Bronze-service-star-3d-vector.svg
Bronze-service-star-3d-vector.svg
Afghanistan Campaign Medal ribbon.svg
Four of the six phases
Silver-service-star-3d.svg
Afghanistan Campaign Medal ribbon.svg
Five of the six phases
Silver-service-star-3d.svg
Bronze-service-star-3d-vector.svg
Afghanistan Campaign Medal ribbon.svg
All six phases

The following ribbon devices are authorized for wear on the Afghanistan Campaign Medal: [4] [16] [12] [17] [18] [19] [20] [21]

Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary Medal

The Afghanistan Campaign Medal replaces the Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary Medal (GWOT-EM) for service in Afghanistan and personnel who previously received the GWOT-EM for Afghanistan service may elect to exchange the medal for the ACM. [22] Both medals may not be received for the same period of service in Afghanistan and any current Afghanistan service will only be recognized with the Afghanistan Campaign Medal. [23]

See also

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References

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  6. "Error". Archived from the original on 28 August 2013. Retrieved 29 May 2015.
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  14. "New Campaign phase approved" (PDF).
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    Tilghman, Andrew (19 February 2015). "Despite war's end, Pentagon extends Afghanistan campaign medal". MilitaryTimes. Gannett. Retrieved 28 February 2015.
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  21. Coast Guard Commandant Instruction 1650.25D
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