Marc Lavoie

Last updated
Marc Lavoie
A picture of Marc Lavoie.jpg
Born1954 (age 6768)
Nationality Canadian
InstitutionProfessor at the University of Ottawa
Field Economics
School or
tradition
Post-Keynesian economics
Alma mater Carleton University
Influences John Maynard Keynes, Michał Kalecki, Nicholas Kaldor, Joan Robinson, Richard Kahn, Wynne Godley
Contributions Economic growth, Structural change, Monetary economics, National accounting, Economics of Ice Hockey
Information at IDEAS / RePEc
Notes

Marc Lavoie (born 1954) [1] is a Canadian professor in economics at the University of Ottawa and a former Olympic fencing athlete.

Contents

Academic career

Born in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, Marc Lavoie is a professor in the Department of Economics at the University of Ottawa, where he started teaching in 1979. He got his doctorate from the University of Paris-1. Besides having published nearly two hundred articles in refereed journals, he has written a number of books, among which are Post-Keynesian Economics: New Foundations (2014), Introduction to Post-Keynesian Economics (2006), translated into four languages, Foundations of Post-Keynesian Economic Analysis (1992), as well as Monetary Economics: An Integrated Approach to Money, Income, Production and Wealth (2007) with Wynne Godley. The latter deals with and employs in its analysis the stock/flow consistent method.

With Mario Seccareccia, he has been the co-editor of three books, including one on the works of Milton Friedman, in addition to writing the first Canadian edition of the Baumol and Blinder first-year textbook (2009).

Lavoie has been the associate editor of the Encyclopedia of Political Economy (1999), and he has been a visiting professor at the universities of Bordeaux, Nice, Rennes, Dijon, Grenoble, Limoges, Lille, Paris-1 and Paris-Nord, as well as Curtin University in Perth, Australia.

Lavoie is also an IMK Research Fellow at the Hans Böckler Foundation in Düsselforf and Policy Fellow at the Broadbent Institute in Toronto. He has lectured at post-Keynesian summer schools in Kansas City, the Levy Economics Institute and Berlin. [2]

Marc Lavoie and fellow post-keynesian economist Wynne Godley (2002) Marc Lavoie and Wynne Godley (2002).jpg
Marc Lavoie and fellow post-keynesian economist Wynne Godley (2002)

Research interests

Athletic career

Lavoie won the Canadian national senior championship in sabre seven times, in 1975–1979 and 1985–1986. He also won the Canadian national junior championship twice, in 1973–1974, and was second at the under-15 French championships in 1969. He was on the Canadian national team from 1973 to 1984. He participated in the 1975, 1979 and 1983 Pan-American Games finishing fourth in the individual event in sabre in 1979. He also participated in the Commonwealth championships in 1974 (4th), 1978 (2nd) and 1982, and competed at the 1976 and 1984 Summer Olympics. [3] [4] Having been named Carleton University's Male Athlete of the Year in 1973-74 and again in 1974–75, on October 16, 2014, Lavoie was inducted into Carleton University's Athletic Hall of Fame [5] He had previously been inducted into the Hall of Fame of the Fédération d’escrime du Québec. [6]

Marc Lavoie (left) competes in the fencing event on July 20th at the 1976 Olympic games in Montreal. Marc Lavoie Fencing 1976.jpg
Marc Lavoie (left) competes in the fencing event on July 20th at the 1976 Olympic games in Montreal.

Los Angeles (1984)

Montreal (1976)

Books

See also

Related Research Articles

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Macroeconomics Study of an economy as a whole

Macroeconomics is a branch of economics dealing with performance, structure, behavior, and decision-making of an economy as a whole. For example, using interest rates, taxes, and government spending to regulate an economy’s growth and stability. This includes regional, national, and global economies. According to a 2018 assessment by economists Emi Nakamura and Jón Steinsson, economic "evidence regarding the consequences of different macroeconomic policies is still highly imperfect and open to serious criticism."

Post-Keynesian economics School of economic thought

Post-Keynesian economics is a school of economic thought with its origins in The General Theory of John Maynard Keynes, with subsequent development influenced to a large degree by Michał Kalecki, Joan Robinson, Nicholas Kaldor, Sidney Weintraub, Paul Davidson, Piero Sraffa and Jan Kregel. Historian Robert Skidelsky argues that the post-Keynesian school has remained closest to the spirit of Keynes' original work. It is a heterodox approach to economics.

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Alan Blinder American economist

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Robert Wayne Clower was an American economist. He is credited with having largely created the field of stock-flow analysis in economics and with seminal works on the microfoundations of monetary theory and macroeconomics.

Wynne Godley

Wynne Godley was an economist famous for his pessimism about the British economy and his criticism of the British government. In 2007, he and Marc Lavoie wrote a book about the "Stock-Flow Consistent" model, an analysis that predicted the global financial crisis of 2008.

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Stock-flow consistent models (SFC) are a family of macroeconomic models based on a rigorous accounting framework, which guarantees a correct and comprehensive integration of all the flows and the stocks of an economy. These models were first developed in the mid-20th century but have recently become popular, particularly within the post-Keynesian school of thought. Stock-flow consistent models are in contrast to dynamic stochastic general equilibrium models, which are used in mainstream economics.

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References

  1. Marc Lavoie profile at the Canadian Olympic Committee website
  2. Marc Lavoie CV at the University of Ottawa website
  3. "Marc Lavoie Olympic Results". sports-reference.com. Archived from the original on 2020-04-17. Retrieved 2011-04-03.
  4. Marc Lavoie's results Archived 2014-10-18 at the Wayback Machine at the Ottawa Fencing Hall of Fame website
  5. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2014-10-20. Retrieved 2014-10-17.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  6. http://escrimequebec.qc.ca/index.php/fr/membres/pantheon [ dead link ]