Daniel McFadden

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Daniel McFadden
Daniel McFadden 01.JPG
Born (1937-07-29) July 29, 1937 (age 85) [1]
NationalityAmerican
Alma mater University of Minnesota
Known for Discrete choice
Awards John Bates Clark Medal (1975)
Frisch Medal (1986)
Erwin Plein Nemmers Prize in Economics (2000)
Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences (2000)
Scientific career
Fields Econometrics
Institutions University of California, Berkeley
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
University of Southern California
Doctoral advisor Leonid Hurwicz
Doctoral students

Daniel Little McFadden (born July 29, 1937) is an American econometrician who shared the 2000 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences with James Heckman. McFadden's share of the prize was "for his development of theory and methods for analyzing discrete choice". [2] He is the Presidential Professor of Health Economics at the University of Southern California and Professor of the Graduate School at University of California, Berkeley.

Contents

Early life and education

McFadden was born on July 29, 1937 in Raleigh, North Carolina. He attended the University of Minnesota, where he received a B.S. in Physics, and a Ph.D. in Behavioral Science (Economics) five years later (1962). While at the University of Minnesota, his graduate advisor was Leonid Hurwicz, who was awarded the Economics Nobel Prize in 2007. [3]

Career

In 1964 McFadden joined the faculty of University of California, Berkeley, focusing his research on choice behavior and the problem of linking economic theory and measurement. In 1974 he introduced Conditional logit analysis. [4]

In 1975 McFadden won the John Bates Clark Medal. In 1977 he moved to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. In 1981 he was elected to the National Academy of Sciences.

He returned to Berkeley in 1991, founding the Econometrics Laboratory, which is devoted to statistical computation for economics applications. He remains its director. He is a trustee of the Economists for Peace and Security. In 2000 he won the Erwin Plein Nemmers Prize in Economics and was elected to the American Philosophical Society in 2006. [5]

In January 2011 McFadden was appointed the Presidential Professor of Health Economics at the University of Southern California (USC), which entails a joint appointment in the Department of Economics and the Price School of Public Policy. [6]

See also

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References

  1. "Daniel L. McFadden". The Nobel Prise. The Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 21 February 2022.
  2. "The Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel 2000". Nobelprize.org. Retrieved October 16, 2007.
  3. "All Laureates in Economics". Nobelprize.org. 2007. Retrieved October 16, 2007.
  4. McFadden, Daniel F. (1974). "Conditional Logit Analysis of Qualitative Choice Behavior" (PDF). Retrieved October 25, 2019.
  5. "APS Member History". search.amphilsoc.org. Retrieved 2021-05-25.
  6. "Nobel Winner, Dr. McFadden, Appointed Presidential Professor at USC". usc.edu. Archived from the original on January 15, 2011. Retrieved January 10, 2011.
Awards
Preceded by Laureate of the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics
2000
Served alongside: James J. Heckman
Succeeded by
Academic offices
Preceded by President of the American Economic Association
2005–2006
Succeeded by