Frisch Medal

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The Frisch Medal is an award in economics given by the Econometric Society. It is awarded every two years for empirical or theoretical applied research published in Econometrica [1] during the previous five years. The award was named in honor of Ragnar Frisch, first co-recipient of the Nobel prize in economics and editor of Econometrica from 1933 to 1954. [2] In the opinion of Rich Jensen, Gilbert F. Schaefer Professor of Economics and chairperson of the Department of Economics of the University of Notre Dame, "The Frisch medal is not only one of the top three prizes in the field of economics, but also the most prestigious 'best article' award in the profession". [3] Five Frisch medal winners have also won the Nobel Prize.

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Winners

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References

  1. 1 2 Reidy, Chris (4 July 2012). "MIT Professor Wins 2d Frisch Award". Boston Globe   via  HighBeam Research (subscription required). Archived from the original on 14 July 2014. Retrieved 8 June 2014.
  2. David A. Dieterle, ed. (2013). Economic Thinkers: A Biographical Encyclopedia. Greenwood. p. 98. ISBN   9780313397479.
  3. Kate Cohorst (July 11, 2012). "Economist Joseph Kaboski receives 2012 Frisch Medal" . Retrieved June 24, 2014.
  4. "Econometric Society awards Frisch Medal 2014 to James Heckman". University of Chicago. 2 May 2014. Retrieved 8 June 2014.