Roland G. Fryer Jr.

Last updated
Roland G. Fryer Jr.; Steven D. Levitt (May 2004). "Understanding the black-white test score gap in the first two years of school" (PDF). The Review of Economics and Statistics . 86 (2).
  • Roland G. Fryer Jr.; Steven D. Levitt (2004). "The Causes and Consequences of Distinctively Black Names" (PDF). Quarterly Journal of Economics . 119 (3): 767–805. CiteSeerX   10.1.1.364.1615 . doi:10.1162/0033553041502180. S2CID   150126139. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2009-03-05.
  • Roland G. Fryer Jr. (2014). "Injecting Charter School Best Practices Into Traditional Public Schools: Evidence from Field Experiments". Quarterly Journal of Economics . 129 (3): 1355–1407. doi:10.1093/qje/qju011.
  • Roland G. Fryer Jr. (2019). "An Empirical Analysis of Racial Differences in Police Use of Force". Journal of Political Economy . 127 (3): 1210–1261. doi:10.1086/701423. S2CID   158634577.
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    References

    1. Roland Fryer, "Curriculum Vitae"
    2. "Fryer interview with Tavis Smiley". The Tavis Smiley Show . PBS. March 30, 2005. Archived from the original on 2008-12-11. Retrieved 2020-07-12.
    3. Levitt & Dubner, Freakonomics, 2009
    4. Becky Purvis, "Ivy League Maverick", UTA Magazine, 2005.
    5. "Roland G. Fryer." Contemporary Black Biography. Vol. 56. Thomson Gale, 2006. Reproduced in Biography Resource Center. Farmington Hills, Michigan: Gale, 2009. Document Number: K1606003406. Fee. Accessed 2009-12-20 via Fairfax County Public Library.
    6. Dubner, Stephen J (2005-03-20). "Toward a Unified Theory of Black America". The New York Times . Retrieved 2007-09-08.
    7. Medina, Jennifer (June 21, 2007). "His Charge: Find a Key to Student's Success". The New York Times .
    8. Roland G. Fryer, Jr. is Professor of Economics at Harvard University and faculty director of the Education Innovation Laboratory (EdLabs). Archive.org (original site has been closed by Harvard University as of 2019).
    9. "MacArthur Fellows Program: Meet the 2011 Fellows". September 20, 2011. John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation. Retrieved 20 September 2011.
    10. "Harvard's Roland Fryer Wins John Bates Clark Medal". Wall Street Journal. Retrieved 2015-04-24.
    11. Austen-Smith, D. and Fryer, R. G. Jr. (2005). "An economic analysis of "acting white"". Quarterly Journal of Economics 120.2 (2005). 120: 551–583.CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
    12. Echenique, F. and Fryer, R. G. Jr (2007). "A Measure of Segregation Based on Social Interactions". Quarterly Journal of Economics. 122: 441–485.CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
    13. Fryer, Roland Gerhard (June 2019). "An Empirical Analysis of Racial Differences in Police Use of Force". Journal of Political Economy . University of Chicago. 127 (3): 1210–1261. doi:10.1086/701423. ISSN   0022-3808. OCLC   8118094562. S2CID   158634577.
    14. 1 2 Fryer, Roland Gerhard (July 2016). An Empirical Analysis of Racial Differences in Police Use of Force (PDF) (Report). NBER Working Papers (Revised January 2018 ed.). National Bureau of Economic Research. doi: 10.3386/w22399 . OCLC   956328193. S2CID   158634577. JELJ01, K0. Archived (PDF) from the original on 2020-10-03; "NBER working papers are circulated for discussion and comment purposes. They have not been peer-reviewed or been subject to the review by the NBER Board of Directors that accompanies official NBER publications."; published in J Polit Econ June 2019.CS1 maint: postscript (link) [13]
    15. LaCapria, Kim (15 July 2016). "A 'Harvard Study' Doesn't Disprove Racial Bias in Officer-Involved Shootings". Snopes. Retrieved 4 August 2016.
    16. Li, Rosa (15 July 2016). "The Research Is Only As Good As the Data". Slate. Retrieved 4 August 2016.
    17. Bui, Quotcrung; Cox, Amanda (12 July 2016). "Surprising New Evidence Shows Bias in Police Use of Force but Not in Shootings". The New York Times . Retrieved 4 August 2016.
    18. Why it’s impossible to calculate the percentage of police shootings that are legitimate, Radley Balko, Washington Post , July 14, 2016
    19. Fryer, Roland (2016-07-12). "Roland Fryer Answers Reader Questions About His Police Force Study". The New York Times . Retrieved 2016-07-12.
    20. Knox, Dean; Lowe, Will; Mummolo, Jonathan (2020-08-05). "Administrative Records Mask Racially Biased Policing—CORRIGENDUM". American Political Science Review . 114 (4): 1394. doi: 10.1017/S0003055420000611 . ISSN   0003-0554. OCLC   8675966912. Archived from the original on 2020-11-08.
    21. Knox, Dean; Lowe, Will; Mummolo, Jonathan (2019-12-21). "The Bias Is Built In: Administrative Records Mask Racially Biased Policing". American Political Science Review (Revised 18 May 2020 ed.). 114 (3): 619–637. doi: 10.1017/S0003055420000039 . ISSN   0003-0554. OCLC   8678024977. SSRN   3336338 . Archived from the original on 2020-11-08; minor correction in August 2020.CS1 maint: postscript (link) [20]
    22. Durlauf, Steven Neil; Heckman, James Joseph (2020-07-21). "An Empirical Analysis of Racial Differences in Police Use of Force: A Comment". Journal of Political Economy . University of Chicago. 128 (10): 3998–4002. doi:10.1086/710976. ISSN   0022-3808. OCLC   8672021465. S2CID   222811199. Archived from the original on 2020-11-08.
    23. Fryer, Roland Gerhard (2020-07-21). "An Empirical Analysis of Racial Differences in Police Use of Force: A Response". Journal of Political Economy . University of Chicago. 128 (10): 4003–4008. doi:10.1086/710977. ISSN   0022-3808. OCLC   8672034484. S2CID   222813143. Archived from the original on 2020-11-08.
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    25. "Star Economics Prof Fryer Facing Harvard and State-Level Investigations, Barred from Lab He Heads". The Harvard Crimson. Retrieved 2020-06-05.
    26. 1 2 3 4 Casselman, Ben; Tankersley, Jim (10 July 2019). "Harvard Suspends Roland Fryer, Star Economist, After Sexual Harassment Claims". The New York Times . Retrieved 2020-07-19.CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
    27. 1 2 3 Morales, Mark (July 10, 2019). "Harvard prof suspended after accusations of sexual harassment". CNN.
    28. Casselman, Ben; Tankersley, Jim (18 December 2018). "Roland Fryer, Accused of Harassment at Harvard, Quits Economics Panel". The New York Times . Retrieved 2020-07-19.CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
    29. "At a Harvard Lab, the Accused Responds". The New York Times . December 20, 2018.
    30. Shera S. Avi-Yonah (5 Oct 2019). "Harvard Closes Fryer's Research Lab As Sanctions Take Effect". The Harvard Crimson. Retrieved 2020-06-07.
    31. "Lunch with the FT: Roland Fryer", Financial Times
    32. "Stand-up Underground". www.facebook.com. Retrieved 2020-12-19.
    33. "International bright young things". The Economist. December 30, 2008.
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    Roland Fryer
    Roland G. Fryer (10009616) (cropped).jpg
    Born
    Roland Gerhard Fryer Jr.

    (1977-06-04) June 4, 1977 (age 44)
    Occupation Economist, professor
    Awards MacArthur Fellowship (2011)
    Calvó-Armengol Prize (2012)
    John Bates Clark Medal (2015)
    Academic background
    Alma mater University of Texas at Arlington
    Pennsylvania State University
    Thesis Mathematical Models of Discrimination and Inequality
    Doctoral advisor Tomas Sjöström
    Influences Gary Becker
    Steven Levitt
    Glenn Loury