Journal of Political Economy

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Abstracting and indexing

The journal is abstracted and indexed in EBSCO, ProQuest, Research Papers in Economics, Current Contents/Social & Behavioral Sciences, and the Social Sciences Citation Index. According to the Journal Citation Reports , the journal has a 2017 impact factor of 5.247, ranking it 18th out of 353 journals in the category "Economics". [3]

The journal is department-owned University of Chicago journal. [4]

Notable papers

Among the most influential papers that appeared in the Journal of Political Economy are: [5]

... stated Hotelling's rule, laid foundations to non-renewable resource economics. [6]
... first to apply econometric methods to a historic question, which triggered the development of Cliometrics. [7]
... highly influential for introducing the Black–Scholes model for option pricing. [8]
... re-introduced the Ricardian equivalence to macroeconomics, pointing out flaws in Keynesian theory. [9] [10]
... influential new classical critique of Keynesian macroeconomic modelling. [11]
... the second of two papers in which Romer laid foundations to the endogenous growth theory. [12]
... revived the field of economic geography, introducing the core–periphery model. [13]

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References

  1. Ross B. Emmett (ed.), The Chicago Tradition in Economics 1892-1945, Taylor & Francis, 2002, p. xix.
  2. Casselman, Ben; Tankersley, Jim (2020-06-10). "Economics, Dominated by White Men, Is Roiled by Black Lives Matter". The New York Times. ISSN   0362-4331 . Retrieved 2020-06-11.
  3. "Journals Ranked by Impact: Economics". 2017 Journal Citation Reports. Web of Science (Social Sciences ed.). Thomson Reuters. 2018.
  4. Economics; Science (2020-06-10). "Should departments own and control journals?". Marginal REVOLUTION. Retrieved 2020-06-11.
  5. Amiguet, Lluis; Gil-Lafuente, Anna M.; Kydland, Finn E.; Merigo, Jose M. (2017). "One Hundred Twenty-Five Years of the Journal of Political Economy: A Bibliometric Overview". Journal of Political Economy. 125. ISSN   1537-534X.
  6. Devarajan, Shantayanan; Fisher, Anthony C. (1981). "Hotelling's 'Economics of Exhaustible Resources': Fifty Years Later". Journal of Economic Literature . 19 (1): 65–73. JSTOR   2724235.
  7. Fogel, Robert William; Engerman, Stanley L. (1989). "Slavery and the Cliometric Revolution" . Time on the Cross: The Economics of American Negro Slavery. New York: W. W. Norton. ISBN   978-0-393-31218-8.
  8. Read, Colin (2012). The Rise of the Quants: Marschak, Sharpe, Black, Scholes and Merton. London: Palgrave Macmillan. ISBN   9780230274174.
  9. Hoover, Kevin D. (1988). The New Classical Macroeconomics. Oxford: Basil Blackwell. pp.  140–149. ISBN   978-0-631-17263-5.
  10. White, Lawrence H. (2012). "From Pleasant Deficit Spending to Unpleasant Sovereign Debt Crisis". The Clash of Economic Ideas: The Great Policy Debates and Experiments of the Last Hundred Years. Cambridge University Press. pp. 382–411. ISBN   9781107012424.
  11. Thomas, R. L. (1993). Introductory Econometrics: Theory and Applications (2nd ed.). Harlow: Longman. p. 420. ISBN   978-0-582-07378-4.
  12. Romer, David (2011). Advanced Macroeconomics (Fourth ed.). New York: McGraw-Hill. ISBN   9780073511375.
  13. Fujita, M.; Thisse, J.-F. (2002). "Industrial agglomeration under monopolistic competition". Economics of Agglomeration: Cities, Industrial Location and Regional Growth. Cambridge University Press. ISBN   978-0521805247.