Pennsylvania State University

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In addition to the University Park campus, 19 campus locations throughout the commonwealth of Pennsylvania offer enrollment for undergraduate students. Over 60 percent of Penn State first-year students begin their education at a location other than University Park. [53] Each of the 19 commonwealth campuses offer a unique set of degree programs based on the student demographics. Any student in good academic standing is guaranteed a spot at University Park to finish his or her degree if required or desired, known as "change of campus" or, more accurately, "the 2+2 program"; where a Penn State student may start at any Penn State campus, including University Park, for two years and finish at any Penn State the final two years. [54]

Special mission campuses and World Campus

Penn State Dickinson Law in Carlisle Dickinson Law Exterior Day.tif
Penn State Dickinson Law in Carlisle
The Main Building at Penn State Great Valley School of Graduate Professional Studies in East Whiteland Township Penn State Great Valley - Main Building.jpg
The Main Building at Penn State Great Valley School of Graduate Professional Studies in East Whiteland Township

Special mission campuses

  • Dickinson Law, founded in 1834 as The Dickinson School of Law in Carlisle, is the oldest law school in Pennsylvania [55] and the fifth-oldest in the country. Since its founding, its graduates have included several notable attorneys, judges, government and corporate leaders, and legal educators. Dickinson School of Law's 1997 merger with Penn State was completed in 2000. It expanded its reputation, network, and joint degree programs complementing Dickinson Law's legacy as an innovative leader in experiential education. [56] In 2006, a second campus was opened at University Park. The school was split in 2014 into two separately accredited law schools: Dickinson Law in Carlisle and Penn State Law at University Park. [57] The last students to attend the dual-campus Penn State Dickinson School of Law graduated in May 2017. [58]
  • The Penn State Great Valley School of Graduate Professional Studies is a special mission campus offering master's degrees, graduate certification, and continuing professional education. Located in Malvern, Pennsylvania, it also offers classes at the old Philadelphia Naval Shipyard.
  • Penn State College of Medicine in Hershey, Pennsylvania, is the university's medical school and teaching hospital. Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center became the ninth hospital in the United States and 16th worldwide to implant the "CardioWest temporary Total Artificial Heart" when a 60-year-old man suffering from end-stage heart failure received the device in May 2008.
  • Pennsylvania College of Technology, in Williamsport, Pennsylvania, offers certificates as well as degrees in over ten technical fields. Pennsylvania College of Technology became an affiliate of The Pennsylvania State University in 1989.

World Campus

In 1998, the university launched Penn State World Campus, or Penn State Online, which offers more than 60 online education programs, degrees, and certificates. Distance education has a long history at Penn State, one of the first universities in the country to offer a correspondence course for remote farmers in 1892. Examples of online programs include an MBA, a master of professional studies in homeland security, a Bachelor of Science in nursing, and post-baccalaureate certificates in geographic information systems and applied behavior analysis. [59]

Organization and administration

Penn State is a state-related university and a member of Pennsylvania's Commonwealth System of Higher Education. While it receives funding from the Commonwealth and is connected to the state through its board of trustees, however, it is otherwise independent and not subject to any direct control by the state. For the 2006–2007 fiscal year, the university received 9.7 percent of its budget from state appropriations, the lowest of the four state-related institutions in Pennsylvania. [60] Initial reports concerning the 2007–2008 fiscal year indicated that Pennsylvania Governor Ed Rendell is recommending a 1.6 percent increase in state appropriations. [61] Penn State's appropriation request, submitted to the Pennsylvania Department of Education in September, requested a 6.8 percent increase in funding. [62] [ needs update ]

Colleges

Schreyer Honors College Schreyers Honors College.png
Schreyer Honors College
Carnegie Building CarnegieBuildingPennStateUniversity.jpg
Carnegie Building
Huck Institute of the Life Sciences: Gateway to the Sciences Penn State University Huck Institute of the Life Sciences 6.jpg
Huck Institute of the Life Sciences: Gateway to the Sciences

Penn State has eighteen colleges, including three at special-mission campuses. The University Park campus is organized into fourteen distinct colleges, plus the graduate school and the division of undergraduate studies: [63]

Pennsylvania State University
Pennsylvania State University seal.svg
Former name
Farmer's High School of Pennsylvania (1855–1862)
Agricultural College of Pennsylvania (1862–1874)
The Pennsylvania State College (1874–1953)
Dickinson School of Law (1834–2000)
The Chestnut Street Female Seminary (1850–1883)
The Ogontz School for Girls (1883–1950)
Wyomissing Polytechnic Institute (1930–1958)
Pennsylvania State Forest Academy (1903–1929)
Motto"Making Life Better"
On seal: "Virtue, Liberty, and Independence"
Type Public state-related land-grant research university
EstablishedFebruary 22, 1855;169 years ago (1855-02-22)
Accreditation MSCHE
Academic affiliations
Endowment $4.5 billion (2022) [1]
Budget$8.6 billion (2022-23) [2]
Chairperson Matthew W. Schuyler [3]
President Neeli Bendapudi [4]
Provost Justin Schwartz [5]
Academic staff
8,002 [6]
Administrative staff
17,218 [6]
Students89,816 [7] [8]
 46,723 (University Park)
Undergraduates 74,446 [7]
  39,809 (University Park)
Postgraduates 14,039 [7]
  6,092 (University Park)
1,331 [7]
Location, ,
40°47′54″N77°51′36″W / 40.79833°N 77.86000°W / 40.79833; -77.86000
Campus Small city, 7,343 acres (2,972 ha)
Total (statewide), 22,484 acres (9,099 ha) [9]
Other campuses
Newspaper
Colors Blue and white
   
Nickname
Sporting affiliations
Mascot Nittany Lion
Website www.psu.edu OOjs UI icon edit-ltr-progressive.svg
Pennsylvania State University logo.svg
ASN 3999 OOjs UI icon edit-ltr-progressive.svg

The university's board of trustees voted in January 2007 to create a school of international affairs, with the first classes admitted in the fall 2008 semester. [64] The school is part of Penn State Law. [65]

Formerly the school of nursing, on September 25, 2013, the board of trustees granted the nursing program college status. [66]

Board of trustees

The 32-member board of trustees governs the university. Its members include the university's president, the Governor of the Commonwealth, and the state Secretaries of Agriculture, Conservation and Natural Resources, and Education. The other members include six trustees appointed by the Governor, nine elected by alumni, and six elected by Pennsylvania agricultural societies. Six additional trustees are elected by a board representing business and industry enterprises. [67] Undergraduate students do not elect any trustees; the court case Benner v. Oswald ruled that the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment did not require the undergraduate students be allowed to participate in the selection of trustees.

As of 2013, the chair of the board of trustees is Keith E. Masser, a graduate of Penn State and the chairman and chief executive officer of Sterman Masser, Inc. [68]

The board's main responsibilities are to select the president of Penn State, determine the goals and strategic direction of the university, and approve the annual budget. [69] Regular meetings of the board are held bi-monthly and take place primarily on the University Park campus, although on occasion meetings are held at other locations within the Commonwealth. [70]

Administration

Old Main, the main administrative building of Penn State, located on the university's main campus Old Main - Penn State.png
Old Main, the main administrative building of Penn State, located on the university's main campus

The university president is selected by the board and is given the authority for actual control of the university, including day-to-day management. In practice, part of this responsibility is delegated by the president to other administrative departments, the faculty, and the student body. [69] Neeli Bendapudi became the university's 19th and current president on May 9, 2022, upon the departure of Eric J. Barron. [4] The executive vice president and provost is the chief academic officer of the university. The current provost, Nicholas P. Jones, assumed office on July 1, 2013. [71]

Student government

HUB-Robeson Center, Penn State's student union center on the main campus Penn State University HUB 10.jpg
HUB-Robeson Center, Penn State's student union center on the main campus

Penn State has a long history of student governance. Elected student leaders remain directly involved in the decision-making of the university administration, as provided for in the board of trustees' standing orders. [72] There are four student governments recognized by the university administration: the University Park Undergraduate Association (UPUA), the Graduate and Professional Student Association (GPSA), the Council of Commonwealth Student Governments (CCSG), and the World Campus Student Government Association (WCSGA). [73]

The University Park Undergraduate Association (UPUA) is the representative student government of the undergraduate students at Penn State's University Park campus, which was established in 2006 after the former student government, Undergraduate Student Government (USG), lost its recognition by way of a student referendum. [74] Graduate and professional students at the university are represented by the Graduate and Professional Student Association (GPSA), the oldest continuously existing student governance organization at Penn State. [75]

The 19 commonwealth campuses of the university are governed by the Council of Commonwealth Student Governments (CCSG), formerly known as the Council of Branch Campus Student Governments (CBCSG). [76]

In 2019, the World Campus Student Government Association (WCSGA) was formed to advocate for the interests and concerns of the more than 20,000 Penn State World Campus students. [77]

Academics

Admissions

Undergraduate

Undergraduate admissions statistics
2021 entering
class [78]

Admit rate57.6
Yield rate 19.0
Test scores middle 50% *
SAT Total1200-1400
(among 37% of FTFs)
ACT Composite26-32
(among 8% of FTFs)
  • *Among students who chose to submit

For the Class of 2025 (enrolled fall 2021), Penn State received 78,578 applications and accepted 45,269 for an acceptance rate of 57.6%. Of those accepted, 8,614 enrolled, a yield rate (the percentage of accepted students who choose to attend the university) of 19.0%. Penn State's freshman retention rate is 93.1%, with 85% going on to graduate within six years. [78]

The university started test-optional admissions with the Fall 2021 incoming class in response to the COVID-19 pandemic and extended this through Fall 2023. Of the 37% of the incoming freshman class who submitted SAT scores, the middle 50 percent had composite scores between 1200 and 1400. Of the 8% of enrolled freshmen in 2021 who submitted ACT scores, the middle 50 percent composite score was between 26 and 32. [78]

Pennsylvania State University Park is a college-sponsor of the National Merit Scholarship Program and sponsored five Merit Scholarship awards in 2020. In the 2020–2021 academic year, 16 incoming freshman students were National Merit Scholars. [79]

Fall First-Time Freshman Statistics [78] [80] [81]
20212020201920182017
Applicants78,57873,86171,90352,74256,114
Admits45,26940,03135,30229,79328,233
Admit rate57.654.249.156.550.3
Enrolled8,6148,4658,3318,0757,863
Yield rate19.021.123.627.127.9
ACT composite*
(out of 36)
26-32
(8%)
25-30
(18%)
25-30
(17%)
25-30
(22%)
25-30
(30%)
SAT composite*
(out of 1600)
1200-1400
(37%)
1150-1340
(77%)
1160-1370
(78%)
1160-1360
(74%)
1160-1340
(65%)
* middle 50% range
percentage of first-time freshmen who chose to submit

Academic divisions

Penn State is accredited by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education. The Smeal College of Business, The Sam and Irene Black School of Business, Penn State Harrisburg, and Penn State Great Valley are accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB). [82]

The university offers an accelerated Premedical-Medical Program in cooperation with Sidney Kimmel Medical College. [83] Students in the program spend two or three years at the university before attending medical school at Jefferson.

Rankings

Academic rankings
National
ARWU [84] 40–54
U.S. News & World Report [85] 60
WSJ / College Pulse [86] 46
Global
ARWU [87] 101–150
QS [88] 83
THE [89] 122
U.S. News & World Report [90] 84

The Academic Ranking of World Universities ranked Penn State between 101 and 150th among universities globally and between 42nd and 56th nationally for 2020. U.S. News & World Report ranked the university tied for 63rd among national universities and tied for 23rd among public schools in the United States for 2021. [94]

In 2022, the university was ranked 96th in the QS World University Rankings . [95] The 2021 "World University Rankings" by Times Higher Education ranked the university as the 114th best university in the world. [96] The 2021 Global University Ranking by CWTS Leiden Ranking ranked the university as 52nd-best university in the world and 18th in the U.S. [97]

Research

The Forum Building, a classroom building with four classrooms, each capable of containing over 300 students Forum PSU.jpg
The Forum Building, a classroom building with four classrooms, each capable of containing over 300 students
Osmond Laboratory Penn State University Osmond Laboratory 2.jpg
Osmond Laboratory
Millennium Science Complex Penn State University Millennium Science Complex 5.jpg
Millennium Science Complex
Pattee Library Pattee Mall PSU.jpg
Pattee Library

Penn State is classified among "R1: Doctoral Universities – Very high research activity". [98] Over 10,000 students are enrolled in the university's graduate school (including the law and medical schools), and over 70,000 degrees have been awarded since the school was founded in 1922. [99]

According to the National Science Foundation, Penn State spent $971 million on research and development in 2021, ranking it 26th in the nation. [100] [101]

The Applied Research Lab (ARL), located near the University Park campus, has been a research partner with the United States Department of Defense since 1945 and conducts research primarily in support of the United States Navy. It is the largest component of Penn State's research efforts statewide, with over 1,000 researchers and other staff members. [102] [103]

The Materials Research Institute (MRI) was created to coordinate the highly diverse and growing materials activities across Penn State's University Park campus. With more than 200 faculty in 15 departments, 4 colleges, and 2 Department of Defense research laboratories, MRI was designed to break down the academic walls that traditionally divide disciplines and enable faculty to collaborate across departmental and even college boundaries. MRI has become a model for this interdisciplinary approach to research, both within and outside the university. Dr. Richard E. Tressler was an international leader in the development of high-temperature materials. He pioneered high-temperature fiber testing and use, advanced instrumentation and test methodologies for thermostructural materials, and design and performance verification of ceramics and composites in high-temperature aerospace, industrial, and energy applications. He was founding director of the Center for Advanced Materials (CAM), which supported many faculty and students from the college of earth and mineral science, the Eberly College of Science, the college of engineering, the materials research laboratory and the applied research laboratories at Penn State on high-temperature materials. His vision for interdisciplinary research played a key role in creating the Materials Research Institute, and the establishment of Penn State as an acknowledged leader among major universities in materials education and research. [104] [105] [106]

The university was one of the founding members of the Worldwide Universities Network (WUN), a partnership that includes 17 research-led universities in the United States, Asia, and Europe. The network provides funding, facilitates collaboration between universities, and coordinates exchanges of faculty members and graduate students among institutions. Former Penn State president Graham Spanier is a former vice-chair of the WUN. [107] [108]

The Pennsylvania State University Libraries were ranked 14th among research libraries in North America in the 2003–2004 survey released by The Chronicle of Higher Education. [109] The university's library system began with a 1,500-book two-room library in Old Main, [110] but moved to its own space – Carnegie Library (named after college trustee Andrew Carnegie) – ten years later. [111] In 2009, its holdings had grown to 5.2 million volumes, in addition to 500,000 maps, five million microforms, and 180,000 films and videos. [112] The university is a member of the Center for Research Libraries.

The university's College of Information Sciences and Technology is the home of CiteSeerX, an open-access repository and search engine for scholarly publications. The university is also the host to the Radiation Science & Engineering Center, which houses the oldest operating university research reactor. Additionally, University Park houses the Graduate Program in Acoustics, [113] the only freestanding acoustics program in the United States. The university also houses the Center for Medieval Studies, a program that was founded to research and study the European Middle Ages, [114] and the Center for the Study of Higher Education (CSHE), one of the first centers established to research postsecondary education. It is a member of the CDIO Initiative, an international network of universities working to develop unique teaching methods in engineering. The university is also a member of the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research, an organization of hundreds of leading universities dedicated to researching atmosphere and climatology.

Student life

Student demographics

Student body composition as of May 2, 2022
Race and ethnicity [115] Total
White 65%65
 
Foreign national 8%8
 
Hispanic 8%8
 
Asian 7%7
 
Black 6%6
 
Other [lower-alpha 1] 6%6
 
Economic diversity
Low-income [lower-alpha 2] 23%23
 
Affluent [lower-alpha 3] 77%77
 

As of fall 2010, the racial makeup of the Penn State system including all campuses and special-mission colleges, was 75.4 percent white, 5.5 percent black, 4.3 percent Asian, 4.4 percent Hispanic, 0.2 percent Native American, 0.1 percent Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander, 1.7 percent two or more races, 5.8 percent international students and 3.1 percent of an unknown race. Over the period 2000–2010, minority enrollment as a percentage of total enrollments has risen 5.3 percentage points, [116] while minorities as a percentage of total teaching positions rose 2.0 percentage points from 1997 to 2002. [117]

Penn State has been the subject of controversy for several issues of discrimination. Following some violent attacks on African-Americans in downtown State College in 1988 and complaints that Penn State was not adequately recruiting African-American faculty and students to representative population levels, student activists occupied Old Main. They demanded that Penn State do more to recruit minority students and address intolerance toward minority students on campus and the local community. After President Bryce Jordan canceled a promised meeting with students and organizations in the Paul Robeson Cultural Center on April 8, 1988, 250 students and activists nonviolently occupied Penn State's Telecommunications building on campus. The following morning, 50 state troopers and 45 local and campus police, equipped with helmets, batons, and rubber gloves, entered the building as the crowd outside sang "We Shall Overcome", arresting 89 individuals for trespassing. [118] All charges were later dismissed.

In 1990 a vice provost for educational equity was appointed to lead a five-year strategic plan to "create an environment characterized by equal access and respected participation for all groups and individuals irrespective of cultural differences." [119] [120] Since then, discrimination issues include the handling of death threats in 1992 and 2001, [121] [122] [123] [124] controversy around LGBT issues, [125] and the investigation of a 2006 sexual discrimination lawsuit filed by former Lady Lions basketball player Jennifer Harris, alleging that head coach Rene Portland dismissed her from the team in part due to her perceived sexual orientation. [126] [127]

Housing

Irvin Residence Hall in West Halls PSU residence hall.JPG
Irvin Residence Hall in West Halls
Brill Hall Penn State University Brill Hall 1.jpg
Brill Hall

There are seven housing complexes on campus for students attending the University Park campus: East Halls, North Halls, Pollock Halls, South Halls, West Halls, Eastview Terrace, and Nittany Apartments. Each complex consists of a few separate buildings that are dormitories and a commons building, which has: lounges, the help desk for the complex, mailboxes for each dormitory room, a convenience store, a food court, an all-you-care-to-eat buffet. Different floors within a building may be designated as a Living Learning Community (LLC). LLCs are offered to members of certain student groups (such as sororities), students studying particular majors, students who wish to engage in a particular lifestyle (such as the alcohol-free LIFE House), or other groups who wish to pursue similar goals.

Student organizations

As of September 2014, 864 student organizations were recognized at the University Park campus. [128] In addition, the university has one of the largest Greek systems in the country, with approximately 12 percent of the University Park population affiliated. Additional organizations on campus include Thespians, Blue Band, Chabad, Glee Club, Aish HaTorah, [129] Student Programming Association (SPA), Lion's Pantry, Boulevard, Apollo, 3D Printer Club, Digi Digits, and the Anime Organization, which hosts an annual Central Pennsylvania-based anime convention, Setsucon. [130]

THON

The 2007 Penn State IFC/Panhellenic Dance Marathon THON 2007 BJC.jpg
The 2007 Penn State IFC/Panhellenic Dance Marathon

Annually in February, thousands of students participate in the Penn State IFC/Panhellenic Dance Marathon (THON), the largest student-run philanthropy in the world. [131] Every year, participants stand for 46 hours nonstop and perform a line dance at least once every hour to stay alert alongside other events hosted throughout the weekend such as concerts, games, athlete hour, family hour, and a tribute to all of the children with cancer. In 2007, THON was moved to the Bryce Jordan Center and now lasts 46 hours. THON raises millions of dollars annually for childhood cancer care and research for its sole beneficiary, Four Diamonds. In 2023, THON raised a program record of $15 million. [132]

The Lion's Pantry

The Lion's Pantry is an undergraduate student-run on-campus food pantry and registered student organization. The Lion's Pantry serves undergraduate, graduate, and professional students. With increasing awareness of hunger on college campuses, the Lion's Pantry is one of the nation's most successful startup food pantries. They partner with groups ranging from Boulevard, UPUA, Greek Life, and more to receive over 8,000 food donations a year. The club was also awarded the Class Gift of 2017 in the form of an endowment. [133]

Public safety

Twenty two of Penn State's campuses are served by Penn State University Police and Public Safety. In addition to being a full-service police department, the department also has specialized units such as K9, criminal investigation, bike patrol, a bomb squad, and drones. The police department was founded in 1926 as Campus Patrol.

Penn State University Park is also served by the Penn State University Ambulance Service, known as Centre County Company 20. Penn State EMS is a full-service, licensed ambulance service, staffed by student EMTs. The ambulance is staffed 24/7/365 with the exception of the annual winter break when it goes out of service. The ambulance is affiliated with the University Health Service.

Student media

Student media groups on campus include The Daily Collegian , Penn State's student-run newspaper; Onward State , a student-run blog; The Underground, a multi-cultural student media site; The LION 90.7 FM (WKPS-FM), a student-run radio station; CommRadio, a student-run, internet-based radio program; La Vie, the university's annual student yearbook; Kalliope, a student-produced literary journal; Valley, a student-run style and life magazine; Phroth, a student-run humor magazine; and Penn State Live, the official news source of the university published by its public relations team.

The Daily Collegian ,founded in 1904, provides news, sports, and arts coverage and produces long-form features. It publishes in print on Mondays and Thursdays while classes are in session. Since the summer of 1996, the traditional paper publication has been supplemented by an online edition. Online content is published every day. Penn State's commonwealth campuses receive a weekly copy of the paper titled The Weekly Collegian.

Onward State is a student-run blog geared towards the university's community members. The blog, which was founded in 2008, provides news, event coverage, and opinion pieces. U.S. News & World Report named the blog the "Best Alternative Media Outlet" in February 2009.

The Underground is a multicultural student-run media site devoted to telling the untold stories within the Penn State community. The publication seeks to foster the multicultural student voice through creating an open forum of discussion and promoting diversity and community involvement. The media site was founded in 2015.

The LION 90.7 FM (WKPS-FM) was founded in 1995 as a replacement for Penn State's original student radio station WDFM. The LION broadcasts from the ground floor of the HUB-Robeson Center, serving the Penn State and State College communities with alternative music and talk programming, including live coverage of home Penn State football games.

CommRadio is operated by the Donald P. Bellisario College of Communications. It was founded in the spring of 2003 as an internet-based audio laboratory and co-curricular training environment for aspiring student broadcasters. It airs both sports coverage and news. Other programming includes student talk shows, political coverage, AP syndicated news, and soft rock music. In recent years, ComRadio broadcasters have won numerous state awards for their on-air work.

La Vie (the Life), the university's annual student yearbook, has been published continuously since 1890. [134] La Vie 1987, edited by David Beagin, won a College Gold Crown for Yearbooks award from the Columbia Scholastic Press Association. [135]

Kalliope is an undergraduate literary journal produced by students and sponsored by the university's English Department. It is published in the spring. Kalliope includes works of fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and visual art. [136] In addition, Klio, an online publication, provides students with literary pieces in the fall semester.

Valley is Penn State's student-run life and style magazine. [137] It was founded in 2007.

The student-run humor magazine, founded in 1909 as Froth, is Phroth, which publishes two to four issues each year. Notable Penn State alumni who worked at the magazine include Julius J. Epstein, who wrote the screenplay for Casablanca in 1942 and won three Academy Awards. [138]

Penn State's newspaper readership program provides free copies of USA Today , The New York Times , and local and regional newspapers depending on the campus location. This program, initiated by then-President Graham Spanier in 1997, [139] has since been instituted on several other universities across the country. [140]

Athletics

Wall near Beaver Stadium Pennsylvania State University monument outside Beaver Stadium.jpg
Wall near Beaver Stadium
The "S-Zone", representing "State", in the student section PSU Senior Section.JPG
The "S-Zone", representing "State", in the student section

Penn State's mascot is the Nittany Lion, a representation of a type of mountain lion that once roamed what is now University Park. The school's official colors, now blue and white, were originally black and dark pink. Originally introduced back when athletics were introduced at Penn State, this was changed in 1890 after the pink faded to white and to avoid ridicule from opposing teams. [141] Pink and black still will make periodic appearances at athletic events in the modern era as a special student "S" section during certain games. Penn State participates in the NCAA Division I FBS and in the Big Ten Conference for most sports. [142]

Two sports participate in different conferences: men's volleyball in the Eastern Intercollegiate Volleyball Association (EIVA) [143] and women's hockey in College Hockey America (CHA). [144] The fencing teams operate as independents.

Penn State athletic teams have claimed a total of 81 national collegiate team championships since the university's founding, including 53 NCAA, two consensus Division I football titles, six AIAW, three USWLA, one WIBC, four national titles in boxing, 11 in men's soccer, and one in wrestling in years prior to NCAA sponsorship. [145] The university ranks fifth all-time in NCAA championships in NCAA Division I, and first among Big Ten schools. [146]

Since joining the Big Ten in 1991, Penn State teams have won 124 conference regular season and tournament titles, through June, 2023. [147]

Penn State has one of the most successful overall athletic programs in the country, evidenced by its rankings in the NACDA Director's Cup, a list compiled by the National Association of Collegiate Directors of Athletics that charts institutions' overall success in college sports. From the Cup's inception in the 1993–1994 season, the Nittany Lions have finished in the top 25 every year. [148]

Football

Penn State is best known for its football team, which enjoys a large following. Penn State's Beaver Stadium has the second-largest seating capacity of any stadium in the nation, and the fourth-largest globally. [149] With an official capacity of 106,572, Beaver Stadium is slightly behind Michigan Stadium, whose official capacity is slightly higher at 107,601.

For decades, the Penn State football team was led by coach Joe Paterno, who was in a close competition with Bobby Bowden, head coach for Florida State, for the most wins ever in Division I-A, which is now the FBS. Paterno still led in total wins at the time of Bowden's retirement following the 2010 Gator Bowl. In 2007, Patero was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame. [150]

Paterno amassed 409 victories over his career, the most in NCAA Division I history. [151] Paterno died on January 22, 2012, at the age of 85. Paterno was posthumously honored by Penn State during the September 17, 2016 football game that marked the 50th anniversary of his first game as head coach. [152] [153] [154] [155]

The university opened a new Penn State All-Sports Museum in February 2002, which is a two-level 10,000-square-foot (1,000 m2) museum is located inside Beaver Stadium. [156]

BlueBandPano.jpg
Beaver Stadium, the home stadium for Penn State Nittany Lions football and the second-largest college football statidum in the nation after Michigan Stadium

Notable people

Notable alumni

Alumni association

The former President's house, now adjoined to the Hintz Alumni Center Presidenthouse.jpg
The former President's house, now adjoined to the Hintz Alumni Center

Established in 1870, nine years after the university's first commencement exercises, the Penn State Alumni Association has the stated mission "to connect alumni to the University and each other, provide valuable benefits to members and support the University's mission of teaching, research, and service." [157] The Alumni Association supports a number of educational and extracurricular missions of Penn State through financial support and is the network that connects alumni through over 280 "alumni groups", many of which are designated based on geographical, academic, or professional affiliation. [158]

As of July 1, 2010, the alumni association counted 496,969 members within the United States, with an additional 16,180 in countries around the globe. [159] [160]

About half the United States alumni reside in Pennsylvania, primarily in the urban areas of Philadelphia and its surrounding counties, the Greater Pittsburgh area, and the Centre County region surrounding State College. About 34 percent of United States alumni and 21 percent of international alumni are members of the alumni association. [161] [162]

Membership totaled 176,426 as of 2016, making the Penn State Alumni Association the largest dues-paying alumni association in the world, a distinction it has held since 1995. [163]

See also

Notes

  1. Other consists of Multiracial Americans & those who prefer to not say.
  2. The percentage of students who received an income-based federal Pell grant intended for low-income students.
  3. The percentage of students who are a part of the American middle class at the bare minimum.

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Joseph Vincent Paterno, sometimes referred to as JoePa, was an American college football player, athletic director, and coach. He was the head coach of the Penn State Nittany Lions from 1966 to 2011. With 409 victories, Paterno is the most victorious coach in NCAA FBS history. He recorded his 409th victory on October 29, 2011; his career ended with his dismissal from the team on November 9, 2011, as a result of the Penn State child sex abuse scandal. He died 74 days later, of complications from lung cancer.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Indiana University of Pennsylvania</span> Public university in Indiana, Pennsylvania, U.S.

Indiana University of Pennsylvania (IUP) is a public research university in Indiana, Pennsylvania. As of 2021, the university enrolled 7,044 undergraduates and 1,865 postgraduates, for a total enrollment of 9,009 students. The university is 55 miles (89 km) northeast of Pittsburgh. It is governed by a local Council of Trustees and the Board of Governors of the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education. IUP has branch campuses at Punxsutawney, Northpointe, and Monroeville. IUP is accredited by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Graham Spanier</span> American sociologist and university administrator

Graham Basil Spanier is a South African-born American sociologist and university administrator who became the 16th president of Pennsylvania State University on September 1, 1995. On November 9, 2011, in the wake of the Penn State child sex abuse scandal, Spanier and longtime football coach Joe Paterno were “removed from their positions” by the Penn State board of trustees.

<i>Daily Collegian</i> Independent student newspaper of Pennsylvania State University

The Daily Collegian is a student-produced news outlet, with a newspaper and website, that is published independently at the Pennsylvania State University. The newspaper is printed once a week during the fall and spring semesters, and not at all during the summer semester. It is distributed for free at the University Park campus as well as mailed to subscribers across the country.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Mark Emmert</span> 5th president of the National Collegiate Athletic Association

Mark Allen Emmert is the former president of the National Collegiate Athletic Association. He was the fifth CEO of the NCAA; he was named as the incoming president on April 27, 2010, and assumed his duties on November 1, 2010, and remained in office until March 1, 2023.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Penn State Harrisburg</span> College of Pennsylvania State University

Penn State Harrisburg, officially known as the Pennsylvania State University at Harrisburg—Capital College and also called The Capital College, is an undergraduate college and graduate school of the Pennsylvania State University located in Lower Swatara Township, Pennsylvania. The campus is located 9 miles (15 km) south of Harrisburg. Penn State offers two associate, 34 baccalaureate, 24 master's, and three doctoral degrees as well as certificate and certification programs. It was an upper division college from its founding in 1966 until accepting freshmen and sophomores in 2004.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Penn State Erie, The Behrend College</span> Satellite campus of Penn State University

Penn State Erie, The Behrend College, officially known as the Pennsylvania State University at Erie, The Behrend College and often shortened as Penn State Behrend, is a public satellite campus of Penn State University and is located just outside Erie, Pennsylvania. It is among the largest of Penn State's commonwealth campuses, with about 4,400 students enrolled in Behrend programs on campus and online. The college offers more than 40 undergraduate majors in four academic schools: The Sam and Irene Black School of Business, the School of Engineering, the School of Humanities and Social Sciences, and the School of Science, which includes the Nursing Program. Penn State Behrend also offers five master's degrees, as well as a diverse range of continuing education trainings through its Community and Workforce Programs.

The Penn State Smeal College of Business at the Pennsylvania State University offers undergraduate, graduate, and executive education programs to more than 6,000 students. Accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB), Smeal, is home to more than 150 faculty members who teach and conduct academic research on a range of business topics. The college also features a network of industry-supported research centers.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Penn State Nittany Lions football</span> American football team

The Penn State Nittany Lions team represents the Pennsylvania State University in college football. The Nittany Lions compete in the NCAA Division I Football Bowl Subdivision as a member of the Big Ten Conference, which they joined in 1993 after playing as an Independent from 1892 to 1992.

The Penn State College of Information Sciences and Technology, also known as the College of IST, opened in 1999 as the information school of The Pennsylvania State University. Headquartered at the University Park campus in University Park, Pennsylvania, the college's programs are offered at 21 Penn State campus locations. Dr. Andrea Tapia currently serves as the college's interim dean.

The Donald P. Bellisario College of Communications is the undergraduate and graduate college dedicated to the study of journalism, mass communications and media at Pennsylvania State University. Re-established in 2017 under its new name after the producer, screenwriter and benefactor Donald P. Bellisario, the Bellisario College is home to four departments: Advertising/Public Relations, Journalism, Film Production and Media Studies, and Telecommunications and Media Industries. Offering five undergraduate majors, a master's degree in media studies, and a Ph.D. program in mass communications, the college is the largest accredited program of its kind in the United States. The college's facilities are located on the University Park campus.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Louis Freeh</span> Fifth Director of the FBI (born 1950)

Louis Joseph Freeh is an American attorney and former judge who served as the fifth Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation from September 1993 to June 2001.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Pegula Ice Arena</span>

The Pegula Ice Arena is a 6,014-seat multi-purpose arena in University Park, Pennsylvania on the campus of Penn State University. The facility is located on the corner of Curtin Road and University Drive near the Bryce Jordan Center. The arena is named after Kim and Terry Pegula for their donations to fund the arena and it replaced the 1,350-seat Penn State Ice Pavilion.

The Penn State child sex abuse scandal concerned allegations and subsequent convictions of child sexual abuse committed by Jerry Sandusky, an assistant coach for the Penn State Nittany Lions football team, over a period of at least fifteen years. The scandal began to emerge publicly in March 2011 and broke in early November 2011 when Sandusky was indicted on 52 counts of child molestation, stemming from incidents that occurred between 1994 and 2009. Sandusky was ultimately convicted on 45 counts of child sexual abuse on June 22, 2012, and was sentenced to a minimum of 30 years and a maximum of 60 years in prison.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Timothy Curley</span>

Timothy M. Curley is a former athletic director for Penn State University.

The Pennsylvania State University School of Hospitality Management is located at the main campus of The Pennsylvania State University in University Park, Pennsylvania, United States, and serves over 500 students. SHM is one of the three oldest continually-operating hospitality management programs in the United States and offers a Bachelor of Science (B.S.), Master of Professional Studies (M.P.S.) and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Hospitality Management. The B.S. Degree offers an optional minor in Entrepreneurship and Innovation.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Penn State Law</span> Law school in University Park, Pennsylvania, US

Penn State Law, located in University Park, Pennsylvania, is one of two separately accredited law schools of the Pennsylvania State University. Penn State Law offers J.D., LL.M., and S.J.D. degrees. The school also offers a joint J.D./M.B.A. with the Smeal College of Business, a joint J.D./M.I.A. degree with the School of International Affairs, which is also located in the Lewis Katz Building, as well as joint degrees with other graduate programs at Penn State.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Sue Paterno</span> American philanthropist

Suzanne Pohland Paterno, sometimes referred to as "SuePa", is an American philanthropist. She is the widow of football coach Joe Paterno, who led the Penn State Nittany Lions from 1966 to 2011.

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