NCAA Division I Football Bowl Subdivision

Last updated

NCAA Division I Football Bowl Subdivision
Current season, competition or edition:
Sports current event.svg 2022 NCAA Division I FBS football season
NCAA football icon logo.svg
Sport American football
Founded 1978
No. of teams 131 (133 in 2023)
Country United States
TV partner(s) Various
Official website www.ncaa.com/sports/football/fbs

The NCAA Division I Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS), formerly known as Division I-A, is the highest level of college football in the United States. The FBS consists of the largest schools in the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). As of 2022, there are 10 conferences and 131 schools in FBS.

Contents

College football is one of the most popular spectator sports throughout much of the United States, and the top schools generate tens of millions of dollars in yearly revenue. [1] [2] Top FBS teams draw tens of thousands of fans to games, and the ten largest American stadiums by capacity all host FBS teams or games. Starting July 1, 2021, college athletes are now able to get paid for the use of their image and likeness. Prior to this date colleges were only allowed to provide players with non-monetary compensation such as athletic scholarships that provide for tuition, housing, and books.

Unlike other NCAA divisions and subdivisions, the NCAA does not officially award an FBS football national championship, nor does it sanction a playoff tournament to determine such a champion on the field. Instead, organizations such as the Associated Press and AFCA have historically sought to rank the teams and crown a national champion, by taking a vote of sports writers and coaches, respectively. In place of such a playoff, various cities across the United States hold their own post-season contests, called bowl games , in which they traditionally invite teams to participate in them. Historically, these bowl games were mostly considered to be exhibition games involving a payout to participating teams. However, in the modern era they are considered the de facto post-season. There have been agreements in recent decades (such as the Bowl Coalition from 1992 to 1994, the Bowl Alliance from 1995 to 1997, the Bowl Championship Series from 1998 to 2013, and the College Football Playoff from 2014 to the present) by the premier FBS conferences and bowl games to organize matchups so that the FBS national championship is decided on the field.

Overview

Number of FBS teams per state/territory as of 2022:
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Six or more FBS schools in the state
Five
Four
Three
Two
One
No FBS schools FBS teams by state (2022).png
Number of FBS teams per state/territory as of 2022:
  Six or more FBS schools in the state
  Five
  Four
  Three
  Two
  One
  No FBS schools

The FBS is the highest level of college football in the United States, and FBS players make up the vast majority of the players picked in the NFL Draft. [4] For every sport but football, the NCAA divides schools into three major divisions: Divisions I, II, and III. However, in football, Division I is further divided into two sub-divisions: the Bowl Subdivision, abbreviated as the FBS, and the Championship Subdivision, abbreviated as the FCS. [5] Divisions are themselves further divided up into conferences, which are groupings of schools that play each other in contention for a conference championship. The FBS currently has ten conferences, which are often divided into the "Power Five conferences" and the less prominent "Group of Five".

Although FCS programs can draw thousands of fans per game, many FCS schools attempt to join the FBS in hopes of increased revenue, corporate sponsorship, alumni donations, prestige, and national exposure. [6] However, FBS programs also face increased expenses in regards to staff salaries, facility improvements, and scholarships. [6] The athletic departments of many FBS schools lose money every year, and these athletic departments must rely on subsidies from the rest of the university. [7] In many states, the highest-paid public employee is the head coach of an FBS team. [8] FBS schools are limited to a total of 85 football players receiving financial assistance. [9] Nearly all FBS schools that are not on NCAA probation give 85 full scholarships.[ citation needed ]

In order to retain FBS membership, schools must meet several requirements. [10] FBS schools must have an average home attendance of at least 15,000 (over a rolling two-year period). [10] An FBS school must sponsor a minimum of 16 varsity intercollegiate teams (including football), with at least six men's or coeducational teams and at least eight all-female teams. [10] Across all sports, each FBS school must offer at least 200 athletic scholarships (or spend at least $4 million on athletic scholarships) per year, and FBS football teams must provide at least 90% of the maximum number of football scholarships (which is currently 85). [10]

Scheduling

The FBS season begins in late August or early September and ends in January with the College Football Playoff National Championship game. Most FBS teams play 12 regular season games per year, with eight or nine of those games coming against conference opponents. [11] All ten FBS conferences hold a conference championship game to determine the winner of the conference. [12] Between conference games, non-conference games, a conference championship game, and up to two bowl games if ranked among the top four college teams in the country by the College Football Playoff Committee. Only the four Playoff teams are eligible to participate in two bowl games in one post-season, and only the winners of the two playoff semifinal bowl games will play a 15th game when they meet in the College Football Playoff National Championship. The Hawaii Rainbow Warriors [13] and teams that play at Hawaii [14] get a special exemption and are allowed to play a thirteenth regular season game in order to defray travel costs, [11] so an FBS team that plays 13 regular season games, a conference championship game, a semifinal bowl game, and in the national championship game could theoretically play 16 games in a season. No team has played a 16th game in one season, due to the unlikelihood of a team playing Hawaii at some point, finishing the season ranked in the top four, opting in to a 13th regular season game, and then winning a Playoff semifinal game. The theoretical 16th game has only been possible since the beginning of the College Football Playoff era in 2015.

Number of bowl games [15]
YearBowlsTeams in bowls [16]
196811N/A
198418~30%
199720~35%
201740 [lower-alpha 1] 60.5% [lower-alpha 2]

For non-conference regular season games, FBS teams are free to schedule match-ups against any other FBS team, regardless of conference. A small number of FBS teams are independent, and have total control over their own schedule. Non-conference games are scheduled by mutual agreement and often involve "home and homes" (where teams alternate as hosts) and long-established rivalries. A 2014 study found that teams from the stronger conferences frequently play non-conference games against teams from the weaker conferences or, occasionally, against FCS teams. [17] FBS teams are free to schedule up to forty percent of their games against FCS teams, [10] but FBS teams can only use one win per season against an FCS team for the purposes of bowl eligibility. Additionally, the FCS opponent must have averaged at least 90% of the FCS limit of 63 scholarship equivalents over a rolling two-year period. [18] [lower-alpha 3] An FBS team must schedule a total of five home games per year; for the purposes of scheduling, a "home game" must take place at a venue in which the team plays 50% of its "home games", although a team is allowed to count one neutral-site game against an FBS team toward the "home game" requirement. [20] FBS-FCS games, known as "money games," are often home games for the FBS team, and victories by FCS teams are usually considered to be upsets. [21] FCS teams receive hundreds of thousands of dollars for their participation in these games. [21]

New Year's Six Bowls
BowlLocationEst.
Rose Bowl Pasadena, CA
Durham, NC (1942)
Arlington, TX (2021)
1902
Orange Bowl Miami Gardens, FL 1935
Sugar Bowl New Orleans, LA
Atlanta, GA (2006)
1935
Cotton Bowl Arlington, TX 1937
Peach Bowl Atlanta, GA 1968
Fiesta Bowl Glendale, AZ 1971

The Football Bowl Subdivision gets its name from the bowl games that many FBS teams play at the end of the year, although other college divisions also have their own bowl games. FBS bowl games are played at the end of the season in December or January, and collectively generate over $400 million per year as of 2012. [22] For the 2017–18 bowl season, there were 40 bowl games. In order to be bowl eligible, an FBS team must have a winning record. In certain cases, 5–7 and 6–7 teams can also be selected to bowls, usually to fill bowl vacancies. [23]

Many bowls have an established conference tie-in; for example, the Cheez-It Bowl provides a match-up between teams from ACC and the Big 12. A small number of long-established bowls played a major role in the Bowl Championship Series, which was used to select the national champion until 2015, and these bowls continue to play a major role in the College Football Playoff. Under the playoff, there are six major bowls, known as the New Year's Six, with automatic bids going to the conference champions of the Power Five conferences and the top-ranked member of the "Group of Five." Two of these bowls serve as semi-final games to the College Football Playoff National Championship game. Conferences receive millions of dollars for each school that appears in the playoff, and appearances in other bowls are also quite lucrative. [24] In addition to the regular bowls, some post-season bowls, such as the NFLPA Collegiate Bowl, match up teams of all-stars and NFL Draft entrants.

History

NCAA Football Average Attendance
Conf.1983 [25] 1993 [25] 2003 [26] 2014 [27]
SEC 64,84262,78974,05977,694
Big Ten 67,47163,53570,19866,869
Big 12 56,36258,102
Pac-12 47,24847,91951,60852,702
ACC 42,60844,05651,93850,291
AAC [lower-alpha 4] 38,03946,87029,193
MW 32,80925,254
C-USA 32,34620,455
Sun Belt 14,35218,294
MAC 17,35114,25217,82015,431
FBS42,16241,28144,87744,603
FCS10,8448,5997,7398,310

College football has been played for over one hundred years, but the game and the organizational structure of college football have evolved significantly during that time. The first college football game was played in 1869, but the game continued to develop during the late 19th and early 20th century. During this period, Walter Camp pioneered the concept of a line of scrimmage, the system of downs, and the College Football All-America Team. [28] The 1902 Rose Bowl was the first bowl game in college football history, and the event began to be held annually starting with the 1916 Rose Bowl. In the 1930s, other bowl games came into existence, including the Sugar Bowl, the Cotton Bowl Classic, and the Orange Bowl. The 1906 college football season was the first season played under the IAAUS (which would later change its name to the NCAA) and the first season in which the forward pass was legal. The IAAUS had formed after President Theodore Roosevelt, responding to several deaths that had occurred during football games, requested that colleges find ways to make football a safer sport. [29] In 1935, the Heisman Trophy was presented for the first time; the award is generally considered to be college football's most prestigious individual award. [30] In 1965, the NCAA voted to allow the platoon system, in which different players played on offense and defense; teams had previously experimented with the concept in the 1940s. [31] In 1968, the NCAA began allowing freshmen to compete in games; freshmen had previously been required to take a redshirt year. [32] In 1975, after a growth of "grants-in-aid" (scholarships given for athletic rather than academic or need-based reasons), the NCAA voted to limit the number of athletic scholarships each school could offer. [33] In 1968, the NCAA required all teams to identify as members of either the University Division (for larger schools) or the College Division (for smaller schools), and in 1973, the NCAA divided into three divisions. [34] At the urging of several larger schools seeking increased autonomy and commonality, Division I-A was formed prior to the 1978 season; the remaining teams in Division I formed the Football Championship Subdivision or FCS (then known as Division I-AA). [35] In 1981, members of the College Football Association attempted to create a fourth division consisting solely of the most competitive schools, but this effort was defeated. [36] In the 1992 season, the SEC split into divisions and played the first FBS conference championship game. The Big 12 and Western Athletic Conference did the same for the 1996 season, and most conferences eventually adopted divisions and championship games.

The NCAA does not officially award an FBS football championship, [37] but several teams have claimed national championships. Other organizations have also sought to rank the teams and crown a national champion. The Dickinson System and other methods were formed in the early 20th century to select the best team in the country, and the AP Poll and the Coaches Poll began rankings teams in the middle of the 20th century. In many seasons, selectors such as the AP and the Coaches Poll designated different teams as national champions. Often, more than one team would finish undefeated, as the top teams were not guaranteed to play each other during the regular season or in bowl games. In 1992, five major conferences established the Bowl Coalition in order to determine the FBS champion. In 1998, the two remaining major conferences joined with the other five conferences to form the Bowl Championship Series. The BCS used a rankings system to match up the top two teams in the BCS National Championship Game. [38] However, even the BCS era saw split national championships, as in 2003 the AP Poll and the Coaches Poll selected different national champions. The College Football Playoff, with a four-team field, replaced the BCS starting with the 2014 season.

Currently as of March 2020, there is no unified system to provide FBS football players with financial compensation aside from collegiate scholarships. Leading the forefront of the movement on compensation is California governor Gavin Newsom. He stated, "Collegiate student athletes put everything on the line — their physical health, future career prospects and years of their lives to compete. Colleges reap billions from these student athletes' sacrifices and success but, in the same breath, block them from earning a single dollar," he said in a statement. "That's a bankrupt model — one that puts institutions ahead of the students they are supposed to serve. It needs to be disrupted." Newsom passed a law in California called the "Fair Play to Pay Act" making it the first state to allow student athletes to profit off their name, image and likeness. The law is scheduled to go in effect on January 1, 2023. [39]

Television

College football was first broadcast on radio in 1921, and first broadcast on television in 1939. [40] Television became profitable for both schools and the NCAA, which tightly controlled the airing of games in the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s. [41] The NCAA limited each football team to six television appearances over a two-year period. [41] The 1981 Supreme Court case NCAA v. Board of Regents of the University of Oklahoma & University of Georgia granted television rights to individual schools as opposed to the NCAA and allowed teams to televise all of their games. [42] After a period during which FBS schools negotiated collectively under the College Football Association, Notre Dame's 1991 television contract ushered in an era in which schools and conferences negotiate their own television contracts. [35] [43] This new era of television led to several waves of conference realignment, most notably in 1996, 2005, and the early 2010s. [44] FBS games continue to be a major draw on television, as over 26 million people watched the 2014 BCS National Championship Game. [45]

National networks such as CBS, ABC, NBC, several ESPN networks, and several Fox networks have all covered the FBS, as have several regional and local networks. As conferences negotiate their own television deals, each conference is affiliated with a network that airs its home games. In the mid-2000s, college and conferences began to create their own television networks; [46] such networks include the Big Ten Network, BYUtv, the Longhorn Network, and the Pac-12 Network. In 2012, college football games drew over 400 million viewers. [47]

Teams and conferences

Conferences

FBS teams and conferences
YearConferencesTeams
198013 [48] 138
19909 [49] 107
200011 [50] 116
201011 [51] 120
202210 131

History

The Big Ten (then popularly known as the Western Conference) was founded in 1896, after which several other schools joined together to form conferences, including the Pacific Coast Conference, the MVIAA, the Southwest Conference, the Southern Conference, the Mountain States Conference (also known as the Skyline Conference), and the Border Conference. In 1928, six schools seceded from the MVIAA to form the Big Six Conference, which later expanded to the Big Eight in 1957; the remaining schools formed the Missouri Valley Conference. In 1932, several Southern schools formed the SEC after breaking away from the Southern Conference, and in 1953 several more schools seceded from the Southern Conference to form the ACC. In 1946, several Midwestern schools formed the MAC. Several elite Northeastern schools had formed the Eastern Intercollegiate Basketball League in 1901, and its members (plus Brown University, not an EIBL member at the time) signed the Ivy Group Agreement, which governed football competition between the signatories, in 1945; the Ivy League was formally founded in 1954, when the agreement was extended to cover all sports. In 1959, the Pacific Coast Conference dissolved, and most of its former members formed the new Athletic Association of Western Universities, which became the Pac-8 when more former PCC members joined. In 1962, several schools from the Mountain States Conference and the Border Conference formed the Western Athletic Conference. In 1969, the Pacific Coast Athletic Association (PCAA), later known as the Big West Conference, was formed by several Division II California schools that sought to join Division I.

Division I separated into Division I-A (the predecessor to the FBS) and I-AA (predecessor of the FCS) prior to the 1978 season. At that time, there were several independent I-A schools and twelve Division I-A conferences: the Southeastern Conference (SEC), Big Ten, Pacific-10 (Pac-10), Big 8, Southwest Conference (SWC), Western Athletic Conference (WAC), PCAA (which later changed its name to the Big West), Missouri Valley Conference, Southern Conference, Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC), Mid-American Conference (MAC), and the Ivy League. The Ivy League and the Southern Conference left for Division I-AA prior to the 1982 season, while the Missouri Valley Conference stopped sponsoring football prior to the 1985 season. In 1991, the Big East recruited several independents and began sponsoring football, becoming a major conference. In 1996, Conference USA (C-USA), formed the previous year by the merger of the non-football Metro and Great Midwest Conferences, also began sponsoring football. That same year, the Southwest Conference dissolved, and four of its former members joined with the Big 8 to form the Big 12 Conference. In 1999, eight schools broke away from the WAC to form the Mountain West Conference (MW). Prior to the 2000 season, the Big West stopped sponsoring football. The Sun Belt Conference began sponsoring football in 2001. After periods of conference realignment in 2005 and the early 2010s that saw the expansion of the ACC, Big Ten, SEC, and Pac-10 (which changed its name to the Pac-12), the WAC reorganized as a non-football conference and the Big East split into the American Athletic Conference and a new non-football conference that retained the Big East name. [52]

Current conferences

Most of the 131 FBS schools are members of an FBS conference, but there are also a small number of independent schools. Since the Western Athletic Conference discontinued football sponsorship prior to the 2013 season, there have been ten conferences in the FBS. All of the FBS conferences have between ten and fourteen members, although independent Notre Dame has a scheduling agreement with the fourteen-member ACC. The ten conferences are split into two groups for the purposes of the College Football Playoff. The "Power Five conferences" consist of most of the largest and best-known college athletic programs in the country. A school from one of the Power Five conferences won every BCS National Championship Game (which operated from 1999 to 2014), and has won every College Football Playoff National Championship. The remaining five conferences are known as the "Group of Five." [53] Any conference may split its teams into two divisions, [54] and as of the 2022 season, the American Athletic Conference, Big 12 Conference, Pac-12 Conference, and Conference USA do not use divisions. The American, the Big 12, and C-USA all previously utilized division systems before abandoning them after losing some of their member schools to realignment: UConn left the American in July 2020, and Marshall, Old Dominion, and Southern Miss left the C-USA in July 2022, leaving both those conferences with an odd number of members, while the Big 12 has not used divisions since the early-2010s conference realignment left it with 10 members. The Pac-12, however, chose to abandon divisions entirely as a result of the NCAA Division I Council ruling that conferences would no longer be required to maintain divisions in order to hold a conference championship. [55] It was the first conference to entirely abandon divisions due to this, with the Atlantic Coast Conference and Mountain West Conference announcing similar intentions for 2023. As of the 2018 season, all conferences hold a championship game that determines the conference champion. The Sun Belt was the last conference to launch a championship game, as well as the most recent to split into divisions for football, with both the title game and the divisional alignment debuting in 2018. That conference chose to form football divisions despite having only 10 football members. [12]

ConferenceNicknameFoundedFootball
Members
SportsHeadquarters
American Athletic Conference The American (official)
AAC (informal)
1979 [lower-alpha 5] 11 [lower-alpha 6] 22 Irving, Texas
Atlantic Coast ConferenceACC195314 [lower-alpha 7] 27 Greensboro, North Carolina
Big 12 ConferenceBig 1219961021 Irving, Texas
Big Ten ConferenceBig Ten, B1G18961428 Rosemont, Illinois
Conference USA C-USA1995 [lower-alpha 8] 1119 Dallas, Texas
Division I FBS Independents [lower-alpha 9] 7
Mid-American Conference MAC19461224 Cleveland, Ohio
Mountain West Conference MW (official)
MWC (informal)
199912 [lower-alpha 10] 19 Colorado Springs, Colorado
Pac-12 ConferencePac-121915 [lower-alpha 11] 1224 San Francisco, California
Southeastern ConferenceSEC19321420 Birmingham, Alabama
Sun Belt Conference Sun Belt (official)
SBC (informal)
19761418 New Orleans, Louisiana

† "Big Five" or "Power Five" conferences with guaranteed berths in the "access bowls" associated with the College Football Playoff

Notes
  1. Includes the College Football Playoff National Championship, which involves the winners of two semifinal bowl games.
  2. Based on 78 teams qualifying for bowl games.
  3. While the Ivy League prohibits athletic scholarships across all sports, the Pioneer Football League prohibits scholarships only in football, and Georgetown chooses not to offer football scholarships, wins against such schools may potentially count toward bowl eligibility. NCAA rules interpretations allow academic aid to count toward the 90% requirement. This issue came up in the 2017 season when Florida State was thought to be bowl-ineligible because one of its six wins that season was over Delaware State, a school that did not meet the 90% requirement with football-related aid. However, once academic aid was counted, Delaware State met the threshold and FSU played in its bowl game. [19]
  4. Includes numbers for the Big East in 1993 and 2003.
  5. The conference was founded in 1979 as the original Big East Conference. It renamed itself the American Athletic Conference following a 2013 split along football lines. The non-FBS schools of the original conference left to form a new conference that purchased the Big East name, while the FBS schools continued to operate under the old Big East's charter and structure. The American also inherited the old Big East's Bowl Championship Series berth for the 2013 season, the last for the BCS.
  6. Navy is a football-only member, and Wichita State is a full member that does not sponsor football.
  7. Notre Dame is a full member except in football, in which it remains independent. It has committed to play at least five games each season against ACC opponents, and to play each other ACC member at least once every three years.
  8. The conference was founded in 1995, with football competition starting in 1996.
  9. Note that "Independents" is not a conference; it is simply a designation used for schools whose football programs do not play in any conference. All of these schools have conference memberships for other sports.
  10. Since 2012, Hawaii has been a football-only associate member, with most of its remaining teams in the non-football Big West Conference.
  11. The charter of the Pac-12 dates only to the formation of the Athletic Association of Western Universities (AAWU) in 1959. However, the Pac-12 claims the history of the Pacific Coast Conference, which was founded in 1915 and began competition in 1916, as its own. Of the nine members of the PCC at the time of its demise in June 1959, five were charter members of the AAWU, and three of the four others joined the AAWU by 1964; only Idaho never joined the Pac-12. The PCC's berth in the Rose Bowl passed to the AAWU.

Transition teams

Georgia Southern University in Statesboro, Georgia joined the Sun Belt Conference upon transitioning to the FBS level in 2014. Prior to joining the Sun Belt, GASOU won six FCS (I-AA) national championships and have produced two Walter Payton Award winners. The Eagles first continuously fielded a football team in 1924; however, play was suspended for World War II and revived in 1981. The Eagles competed as an FCS independent from 1984 until 1992 as the Eagles' main conference at the time, the Trans America Athletic Conference (now known as the ASUN Conference), did not sponsor football, and as a member of the Southern Conference from 1993 until 2013, winning 10 SoCon championships.

The Georgia Southern Eagles finished their first FBS season 9–3 overall and was undefeated in Sun Belt Conference play at 8–0; winning the Sun Belt Conference championship outright in its first year as an FBS member. They were also the first team ever to go unbeaten in conference play in their first FBS season. Since the Eagles were under transitional status, the university filed for a postseason waiver to allow the Eagles to play in a bowl game; however, the NCAA denied Georgia Southern's waiver request and a subsequent appeal since enough full member FBS teams became bowl-eligible during the season.

Liberty University began their FBS transition process on July 1, 2017. The NCAA granted the school a waiver from its normal transition rules that require an invitation from an FBS conference before beginning the transition. The Flames played in the Big South Conference in 2017 but were not eligible for the FCS playoffs. For 2018 to 2022, the Flames became an FBS independent. The school initially intended to remain a Big South member in other sports until it received an invitation to an FBS conference, [56] but instead joined the non-football ASUN Conference in 2018. [57] Conference USA (C-USA) eventually announced in November 2021 Liberty's future addition to that conference, with Flames football moving to C-USA starting in the 2023 season. [58]

The most recent school to complete an FBS transition is Coastal Carolina University, which completed its FBS transition for the 2018 season. The Chanticleers' transition began with the school's move from the Big South to the Sun Belt Conference on July 1, 2016. Coastal competed as a non-football Sun Belt member in 2016–17, with the football team playing the 2016 season as an FCS independent. The school then joined Sun Belt football in 2017, playing a full conference schedule. [59]

The following FBS transitions will take effect on July 1, 2022, when James Madison University joins the Sun Belt after meeting the NCAA minimum of five FBS opponents at its home stadium, as required and scheduled. [60] This is after James Madison's FCS conference Colonial Athletic Association (CAA) barred the Dukes from competing in or hosting team championships in any sport for that conference during the 2021–22 season according to CAA bylaws. However, the Dukes are eligible for at-large bids to all NCAA team championships. [61] On July 1, 2023, other outgoing FCS teams Jacksonville State and Sam Houston are moving to C-USA. [62]

Realignment

The FBS has experienced several realignments since its formation in 1978, with many teams changing conferences, dropping out of the FBS, or moving up from the FCS. In 1982, the size of the division was cut considerably, and the Southern Conference and the Ivy League were demoted to the FCS. [63] In 1985, the Missouri Valley Conference stopped sponsoring football. [52] In the 1980s and 1990s, several independents joined conferences, dropped football, or joined the FCS. In the 1996 NCAA conference realignment, the Southwest Conference dissolved, and four Texas teams from that conference joined with the Big 8 schools to form the Big 12 Conference. The Western Athletic Conference expanded to sixteen members, but half of the schools left in 1999 to form the Mountain West Conference. Conference USA (C-USA) formed from a merger of the Metro Conference and the Great Midwest Conference, two conferences which had not sponsored football. The Big West stopped sponsoring football after the 2000 season, and was essentially replaced by the Sun Belt Conference, which added former Big West members and began sponsoring football in 2001. In the mid-2000s, the Big East added former basketball-only member Connecticut, while Temple left the conference (before eventually returning in 2013). During another phase of realignment in 2005, three schools jumped from the Big East to the ACC. The Big East responded by adding schools from Conference USA. [52]

College football underwent another major conference realignment in the first half of the 2010s. Members of the Big East left the conference to join the Big 12 and ACC. The Big 12 lost members to the SEC, the Pac-12, and the Big Ten, while the Big Ten also gained one former ACC member. The remaining members of the Big East split into two conferences: the American Athletic Conference ("The American") and a new conference that assumed the Big East name but does not sponsor football. The American added several schools from C-USA, but lost one school each to the ACC and Big Ten after its first season. In turn, C-USA added FCS schools and schools from the Sun Belt Conference. The Sun Belt Conference replenished its membership by adding FCS schools and schools from the Western Athletic Conference. The Mountain West lost schools to the Big 12, Pac-12, and the FBS independent ranks, and added several schools from the WAC. After several defections, leaving the conference with only two football-sponsoring schools remaining, the WAC dropped its sponsorship of football. [52]

The early-2010s realignment cycle also affected the FBS independent ranks. BYU left the MW in 2011 for football independence and the non-football West Coast Conference. In 2013, Idaho and New Mexico State, the last two football-sponsoring schools in the WAC, became FBS independents, but would return to their former football home of the Sun Belt Conference as football-only members the following year. Also in 2013, Notre Dame became a full but non-football member of the ACC, entering into a scheduling agreement with that conference that calls for the Fighting Irish football team to play five games each season against ACC schools, and to play each other ACC school at least once every three years. Finally, in 2015, Navy became a football-only member of The American, ending more than a century of football independence. [52]

Realignment continued at a lower level through the rest of the 2010s and into the early 2020s. Georgia Southern joined the Sun Belt Conference upon transitioning to the FBS level in 2014. The Eagles won the Sun Belt Conference championship outright in its first year as an FBS member. The 2016 season saw FCS Coastal Carolina join the Sun Belt Conference for non-football sports while beginning a transition to FBS football; the football team joined the Sun Belt in 2017. That season was also the last for Idaho and New Mexico State as Sun Belt football members. After 2017, New Mexico State returned to independent status, while Idaho downgraded to FCS football—becoming the first program ever to voluntarily do so—and added football to its all-sports membership in the Big Sky Conference. Also in 2016, UMass went independent after turning down an offer of full membership in the Mid-American Conference. Most recently, UConn went independent in 2020 when the school left The American to rejoin many of its historic basketball rivals in the current Big East Conference. Notre Dame competed under a full ACC schedule only also in 2020 in response to logistical concerns that arose from the effects of COVID-19.

The most recent realignment is currently ongoing, starting with the announcements by Oklahoma and Texas that they would leave the Big 12 for the SEC no later than 2025. [64] The first actual conference changes came in 2022, with the Sun Belt gaining Marshall, returning Old Dominion, and Southern Miss from C-USA, [60] [65] and FCS upgrader James Madison. The following year sees C-USA add Jacksonville State, Sam Houston (both from FCS), New Mexico State and Liberty (FBS independents) but lose Charlotte, Florida Atlantic, North Texas, Rice, UAB, and UTSA to The American. In turn, The American will lose Cincinnati, Houston, and UCF to the Big 12, which will also add former football independent BYU. [66] In 2024, UCLA and USC will leave the Pac-12 for the Big Ten. [67]

Awards

Several awards are given each year to players and coaches in the FBS. Although all college football players are eligible for many of these awards (such as the Heisman Trophy), FBS players usually win these awards, and other awards (such as the Walter Payton Award) exist to honor players in other divisions and the FCS. In addition to the national awards listed below, FBS conferences also have their own awards, and several organizations release a yearly College Football All-America Team. In 1951, the National Football Foundation established the College Football Hall of Fame. Notable individual awards include:

The NCAA does not officially name a national champion, but several other organizations name national champions and all conferences participate in the College Football Playoff in order to determine a champion. The winner of the College Football Playoff receives the College Football Playoff National Championship Trophy. The AP awards the AP National Championship Trophy, while the American Football Coaches Association awards the AFCA National Championship Trophy. The AFCA trophy was previously awarded to the winner of the BCS National Championship Game (a predecessor of the College Football Playoff National Championship game), which operated from 1999 to 2014. The Football Writers Association of America awarded the Grantland Rice Trophy until after the 2013 season, and the National Football Foundation awards the MacArthur Bowl. Since the disputed end of the 2003 season, the various organizations have been able to agree on a single national champion.

Maps of teams

1927

1927 map of teams
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Penn State
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Notre Dame
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Army
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Navy
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Syracuse
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Pittsburgh
Steel pog.svg
Colgate
Steel pog.svg
Marquette
Steel pog.svg
Michigan State
Steel pog.svg
Brown
Steel pog.svg
Columbia
Steel pog.svg
Cornell
Steel pog.svg
Dartmouth
Steel pog.svg
Harvard
Steel pog.svg
Penn
Steel pog.svg
Princeton
Steel pog.svg
Yale
Steel pog.svg
Detroit
Steel pog.svg
Furman
Steel pog.svg
West Virginia
Steel pog.svg
Davidson
Steel pog.svg
Wake Forest
Steel pog.svg
Duke
Steel pog.svg
Georgetown
Steel pog.svg
W&J
Steel pog.svg
Creighton
Steel pog.svg
NYU
Steel pog.svg
Lafayette
Steel pog.svg
Carnegie Tech
Brown pog.svg
Virginia Tech
Brown pog.svg
VMI
Brown pog.svg
W&L
Brown pog.svg
Citadel
Brown pog.svg
Virginia
Brown pog.svg
NC State
Brown pog.svg
North Carolina
Brown pog.svg
Clemson
Brown pog.svg
Maryland
Brown pog.svg
South Carolina
Brown pog.svg
Florida
Brown pog.svg
Kentucky
Brown pog.svg
Georgia
Brown pog.svg
Tennessee
Brown pog.svg
Vanderbilt
Brown pog.svg
Alabama
Brown pog.svg
Auburn
Brown pog.svg
LSU
Brown pog.svg
Ole Miss
Brown pog.svg
Mississippi State
Brown pog.svg
Georgia Tech
Brown pog.svg
Tulane
Brown pog.svg
Sewanee
Cyan pog.svg
BYU
Cyan pog.svg
Colorado State
Cyan pog.svg
Colorado
Cyan pog.svg
Wyoming
Cyan pog.svg
Utah
Cyan pog.svg
Utah State
Cyan pog.svg
Denver
Cyan pog.svg
Montana State
Cyan pog.svg
Colorado College
Cyan pog.svg
Colorado Mines
Cyan pog.svg
Western State
Cyan pog.svg
Northern Colorado
Green pog.svg
Iowa State
Green pog.svg
Kansas
Green pog.svg
Kansas State
Green pog.svg
Missouri
Green pog.svg
Nebraska
Green pog.svg
Oklahoma
Green pog.svg
Oklahoma State
Green pog.svg
Drake
Green pog.svg
WUSTL
Green pog.svg
Grinnell
Red pog.svg
California
Red pog.svg
UCLA
Red pog.svg
Oregon
Red pog.svg
Oregon State
Red pog.svg
USC
Red pog.svg
Stanford
Red pog.svg
Washington
Red pog.svg
Washington State
Red pog.svg
Idaho
Red pog.svg
Montana
Location dot deeppink.svg
SMU
Location dot deeppink.svg
Texas A&M
Location dot deeppink.svg
Texas
Location dot deeppink.svg
Rice
Location dot deeppink.svg
Baylor
Location dot deeppink.svg
TCU
Location dot deeppink.svg
Arkansas
Location dot blue.svg
Indiana
Location dot blue.svg
Michigan
Location dot blue.svg
Ohio State
Location dot blue.svg
Illinois
Location dot blue.svg
Iowa
Location dot blue.svg
Minnesota
Location dot blue.svg
Northwestern
Location dot blue.svg
Purdue
Location dot blue.svg
Wisconsin
Location dot blue.svg
Chicago
College football teams in 1927, before six MVIAA teams formed the Big 6. [68]

 

1956

1956 map of teams
Usa edcp location map.svg
Steel pog.svg
Florida State
Steel pog.svg
Penn State
Steel pog.svg
Notre Dame
Steel pog.svg
Louisville
Steel pog.svg
Army
Steel pog.svg
Cincinnati
Steel pog.svg
North Texas
Steel pog.svg
Navy
Steel pog.svg
Syracuse
Steel pog.svg
Pittsburgh
Steel pog.svg
Miami
Steel pog.svg
Pacific
Steel pog.svg
Holy Cross
Steel pog.svg
Boston College
Steel pog.svg
Villanova
Steel pog.svg
Colgate
Steel pog.svg
Dayton
Steel pog.svg
Drake
Steel pog.svg
Rutgers
Steel pog.svg
Texas Tech
Steel pog.svg
Boston University
Steel pog.svg
San Jose State
Steel pog.svg
Marquette
Green pog.svg
Brown
Green pog.svg
Columbia
Green pog.svg
Cornell
Green pog.svg
Dartmouth
Green pog.svg
Harvard
Green pog.svg
Penn
Green pog.svg
Princeton
Green pog.svg
Yale
Location dot green.svg
Colorado
Location dot green.svg
Iowa State
Location dot green.svg
Kansas
Location dot green.svg
Kansas State
Location dot green.svg
Missouri
Location dot green.svg
Nebraska
Location dot green.svg
Oklahoma
Location dot cyan.svg
Wake Forest
Location dot cyan.svg
Virginia
Location dot cyan.svg
NC State
Location dot cyan.svg
North Carolina
Location dot cyan.svg
Duke
Location dot cyan.svg
Clemson
Location dot cyan.svg
Maryland
Location dot cyan.svg
South Carolina
Cyan pog.svg
BYU
Cyan pog.svg
Colorado State
Cyan pog.svg
Wyoming
Cyan pog.svg
New Mexico
Cyan pog.svg
Utah
Cyan pog.svg
Utah State
Cyan pog.svg
Denver
Cyan pog.svg
Montana
Brown pog.svg
West Virginia
Brown pog.svg
Virginia Tech
Brown pog.svg
GW
Brown pog.svg
Furman
Brown pog.svg
VMI
Brown pog.svg
Davidson
Brown pog.svg
Richmond
Brown pog.svg
Citadel
Brown pog.svg
W&M
Location dot orange.svg
Houston
Location dot orange.svg
Tulsa
Location dot orange.svg
Oklahoma State
Location dot orange.svg
Wichita State
Location dot orange.svg
Detroit
Yellow pog.svg
Arizona
Yellow pog.svg
Arizona State
Yellow pog.svg
New Mexico State
Yellow pog.svg
UTEP
Yellow pog.svg
Hardin–Simmons
Yellow pog.svg
West Texas A&M
Red pog.svg
California
Red pog.svg
UCLA
Red pog.svg
Oregon
Red pog.svg
Oregon State
Red pog.svg
USC
Red pog.svg
Stanford
Red pog.svg
Washington
Red pog.svg
Washington State
Red pog.svg
Idaho
Location dot deeppink.svg
SMU
Location dot deeppink.svg
Texas A&M
Location dot deeppink.svg
Texas
Location dot deeppink.svg
Rice
Location dot deeppink.svg
Baylor
Location dot deeppink.svg
TCU
Location dot deeppink.svg
Arkansas
Location dot purple.svg
Florida
Location dot purple.svg
Kentucky
Location dot purple.svg
Georgia
Location dot purple.svg
Tennessee
Location dot purple.svg
Vanderbilt
Location dot purple.svg
Alabama
Location dot purple.svg
Auburn
Location dot purple.svg
LSU
Location dot purple.svg
Ole Miss
Location dot purple.svg
Mississippi State
Location dot purple.svg
Georgia Tech
Location dot purple.svg
Tulane
Location dot blue.svg
Indiana
Location dot blue.svg
Michigan
Location dot blue.svg
Michigan State
Location dot blue.svg
Ohio State
Location dot blue.svg
Illinois
Location dot blue.svg
Iowa
Location dot blue.svg
Minnesota
Location dot blue.svg
Northwestern
Location dot blue.svg
Purdue
Location dot blue.svg
Wisconsin
The "University Division" in 1956. [69]

 

1991

1991 map of teams
Usa edcp location map.svg
Location dot black.svg
South Carolina
Location dot black.svg
Florida State
Location dot black.svg
Penn State
Location dot black.svg
Notre Dame
Steel pog.svg
Louisville
Steel pog.svg
Tulsa
Steel pog.svg
East Carolina
Steel pog.svg
Louisiana Tech
Steel pog.svg
Akron
Steel pog.svg
Memphis
Steel pog.svg
Army
Steel pog.svg
Cincinnati
Steel pog.svg
Southern Miss
Steel pog.svg
Southwestern Louisiana
Steel pog.svg
Northern Illinois
Steel pog.svg
Arkansas State
Steel pog.svg
Navy
Steel pog.svg
Tulane
Location dot deeppink.svg
Houston
Location dot deeppink.svg
Texas Tech
Location dot deeppink.svg
SMU
Location dot deeppink.svg
Texas A&M
Location dot deeppink.svg
Texas
Location dot deeppink.svg
Rice
Location dot deeppink.svg
Baylor
Location dot deeppink.svg
TCU
Location dot deeppink.svg
Arkansas
Location dot red.svg
Arizona
Location dot red.svg
Arizona State
Location dot red.svg
California
Location dot red.svg
UCLA
Location dot red.svg
Oregon
Location dot red.svg
Oregon State
Location dot red.svg
USC
Location dot red.svg
Stanford
Location dot red.svg
Washington
Location dot red.svg
Washington State
Location dot purple.svg
Florida
Location dot purple.svg
Kentucky
Location dot purple.svg
Georgia
Location dot purple.svg
Tennessee
Location dot purple.svg
Vanderbilt
Location dot purple.svg
Alabama
Location dot purple.svg
Auburn
Location dot purple.svg
LSU
Location dot purple.svg
Ole Miss
Location dot purple.svg
Mississippi State
Location dot orange.svg
Boston College
Location dot orange.svg
Syracuse
Location dot orange.svg
Pittsburgh
Location dot orange.svg
Miami (FL)
Location dot orange.svg
Rutgers
Location dot orange.svg
West Virginia
Location dot orange.svg
Virginia Tech
Location dot orange.svg
Temple
Location dot blue.svg
Indiana
Location dot blue.svg
Michigan
Location dot blue.svg
Michigan State
Location dot blue.svg
Ohio State
Location dot blue.svg
Illinois
Location dot blue.svg
Iowa
Location dot blue.svg
Minnesota
Location dot blue.svg
Northwestern
Location dot blue.svg
Purdue
Location dot blue.svg
Wisconsin
Location dot green.svg
Colorado
Location dot green.svg
Iowa State
Location dot green.svg
Kansas
Location dot green.svg
Kansas State
Location dot green.svg
Missouri
Location dot green.svg
Nebraska
Location dot green.svg
Oklahoma
Location dot green.svg
Oklahoma State
Location dot cyan.svg
Georgia Tech
Location dot cyan.svg
Wake Forest
Location dot cyan.svg
Virginia
Location dot cyan.svg
NC State
Location dot cyan.svg
North Carolina
Location dot cyan.svg
Duke
Location dot cyan.svg
Clemson
Location dot cyan.svg
Maryland
Orange pog.svg
BYU
Orange pog.svg
San Diego State
Orange pog.svg
Air Force
Orange pog.svg
Utah
Orange pog.svg
Wyoming
Orange pog.svg
UTEP
Orange pog.svg
Colorado State
Orange pog.svg
New Mexico
Blue pog.svg
Fresno State
Blue pog.svg
San Jose State
Blue pog.svg
Utah State
Blue pog.svg
Pacific
Blue pog.svg
UNLV
Blue pog.svg
Long Beach State
Blue pog.svg
New Mexico State
Blue pog.svg
Cal State Fullerton
Pink pog.svg
BGSU
Pink pog.svg
Central Michigan
Pink pog.svg
Miami (OH)
Pink pog.svg
Toledo
Pink pog.svg
Western Michigan
Pink pog.svg
Ball State
Pink pog.svg
Eastern Michigan
Pink pog.svg
Ohio
Pink pog.svg
Kent State
This map shows Division I-A in 1991, when the Big East was formed and one year before the start of the Bowl Coalition. Hawaii (a member of the WAC) is not shown. Independents that joined an AQ conference by the BCS's inaugural 1998 season (plus Notre Dame, which also automatically qualified for the BCS under certain conditions) are represented by black circles, while the remaining independents are represented by silver pogs.

 

2022

2022 map of teams
Usa edcp location map.svg
Steel pog.svg
Notre Dame
Steel pog.svg
Army
Steel pog.svg
BYU
Steel pog.svg
Liberty
Steel pog.svg
New Mexico State
Steel pog.svg
UConn
Steel pog.svg
UMass
Green pog.svg
Louisiana Tech
Green pog.svg
Rice
Green pog.svg
UTEP
Green pog.svg
Charlotte
Green pog.svg
FIU
Green pog.svg
FAU
Green pog.svg
MTSU
Green pog.svg
North Texas
Green pog.svg
UAB
Green pog.svg
UTSA
Green pog.svg
Western Kentucky
Red pog.svg
Arkansas
State
Red pog.svg
App. St.
Red pog.svg
Coastal Carolina
Red pog.svg
Georgia Southern
Red pog.svg
Georgia State
Red pog.svg
JMU
Red pog.svg
Louisiana
Red pog.svg
Louisiana–Monroe
Red pog.svg
Marshall
Red pog.svg
Old Dominion
Red pog.svg
South Alabama
Red pog.svg
Southern
Miss
Red pog.svg
Texas
State
Red pog.svg
Troy
Pink pog.svg
Akron
Pink pog.svg
NIU
Pink pog.svg
BGSU
Pink pog.svg
Central Michigan
Pink pog.svg
Miami (OH)
Pink pog.svg
Toledo
Pink pog.svg
WMU
Pink pog.svg
Ball St.
Pink pog.svg
EMU
Pink pog.svg
Ohio
Pink pog.svg
Kent State
Pink pog.svg
Buffalo
Blue pog.svg
Temple
Blue pog.svg
SMU
Blue pog.svg
Houston
Blue pog.svg
Navy
Blue pog.svg
Tulane
Blue pog.svg
Memphis
Blue pog.svg
Cincinnati
Blue pog.svg
Tulsa
Blue pog.svg
East
Carolina
Blue pog.svg
UCF
Blue pog.svg
South Florida
Location dot red.svg
Arizona
Location dot red.svg
Arizona State
Location dot red.svg
California
Location dot red.svg
UCLA
Location dot red.svg
Oregon
Location dot red.svg
Oregon State
Location dot red.svg
USC
Location dot red.svg
Stanford
Location dot red.svg
Washington
Location dot red.svg
Washington State
Location dot red.svg
Colorado
Location dot red.svg
Utah
Location dot purple.svg
Texas A&M
Location dot purple.svg
Arkansas
Location dot purple.svg
Florida
Location dot purple.svg
Kentucky
Location dot purple.svg
Georgia
Location dot purple.svg
Tennessee
Location dot purple.svg
Vanderbilt
Location dot purple.svg
Alabama
Location dot purple.svg
Auburn
Location dot purple.svg
LSU
Location dot purple.svg
Ole Miss
Location dot purple.svg
Mississippi State
Location dot purple.svg
Missouri
Location dot purple.svg
South
Carolina
Location dot blue.svg
Penn State
Location dot blue.svg
Rutgers
Location dot blue.svg
Nebraska
Location dot blue.svg
Indiana
Location dot blue.svg
Michigan
Location dot blue.svg
Michigan State
Location dot blue.svg
Ohio St.
Location dot blue.svg
Illinois
Location dot blue.svg
Iowa
Location dot blue.svg
Minnesota
Location dot blue.svg
Northwestern
Location dot blue.svg
Purdue
Location dot blue.svg
Wisconsin
Location dot blue.svg
Maryland
Location dot green.svg
Iowa State
Location dot green.svg
Kansas
Location dot green.svg
Kansas State
Location dot green.svg
Oklahoma
Location dot green.svg
Oklahoma State
Location dot green.svg
Texas Tech
Location dot green.svg
Texas
Location dot green.svg
Baylor
Location dot green.svg
TCU
Location dot green.svg
West
Virginia
Location dot cyan.svg
Georgia Tech
Location dot cyan.svg
WFU
Location dot cyan.svg
Virginia
Location dot cyan.svg
NCSU
Location dot cyan.svg
UNC
Location dot cyan.svg
Duke
Location dot cyan.svg
Clemson
Location dot cyan.svg
Boston College
Location dot cyan.svg
Syracuse
Location dot cyan.svg
Pittsburgh
Location dot cyan.svg
Miami (FL)
Location dot cyan.svg
Virginia Tech
Location dot cyan.svg
Florida State
Location dot cyan.svg
Louisville
Orange pog.svg
San Diego State
Orange pog.svg
Air Force
Orange pog.svg
Wyoming
Orange pog.svg
Colorado State
Orange pog.svg
New Mexico
Orange pog.svg
Fresno State
Orange pog.svg
San Jose State
Orange pog.svg
Utah State
Orange pog.svg
UNLV
Orange pog.svg
Boise State
Orange pog.svg
Nevada
This map shows Division I FBS during the 2022 season. Not shown: Hawaii (Mountain West)

 

Transitioned schools

Schools that have transitioned to the FBS
Usa edcp location map.svg
Green pog.svg
Louisiana Tech
Green pog.svg
Akron
Green pog.svg
UNLV
Red pog.svg
Arkansas State
Red pog.svg
Nevada
Red pog.svg
Louisiana–Monroe
Red pog.svg
North Texas
Red pog.svg
Boise State
Red pog.svg
Buffalo
Red pog.svg
UCF
Red pog.svg
Marshall
Red pog.svg
Middle Tennessee
Blue pog.svg
South Florida
Blue pog.svg
UConn
Blue pog.svg
Troy
Blue pog.svg
Florida Atlantic
Blue pog.svg
FIU
Blue pog.svg
Western Kentucky
Orange pog.svg
UMass
Orange pog.svg
Charlotte
Orange pog.svg
Liberty
Orange pog.svg
Old Dominion
Orange pog.svg
UTSA
Orange pog.svg
Appalachian State
Orange pog.svg
Georgia Southern
Orange pog.svg
Georgia State
Orange pog.svg
South Alabama
Orange pog.svg
Texas State
Orange pog.svg
Coastal Carolina
Black pog.svg
James Madison
Black pog.svg
Sam Houston
Black pog.svg
Jacksonville State
White pog.svg
Idaho
This map shows schools that have transitioned to the FBS since 1978. Green pogs indicate schools that transitioned before 1990, red pogs indicate schools that transitioned between 1990 and 1999, blue pogs indicate schools that transitioned between 2000 and 2009, orange pogs indicate schools that transitioned after 2010, and black pogs that transition after 2020. White pog denotes Idaho, a school that has transitioned from FCS to FBS (1997) and back to FCS (2018).

 

Programs by state

Alabama

TeamNicknameCityStadiumCurrent conferenceFirst played
Alabama Crimson Tide Tuscaloosa Bryant–Denny Stadium SEC 1892
Auburn Tigers Auburn Jordan–Hare Stadium SEC 1892
Jacksonville State Gamecocks Jacksonville Burgess–Snow Field at JSU Stadium ASUN (FCS in 2022) [lower-alpha 1] 1903
South Alabama Jaguars Mobile Hancock Whitney Stadium Sun Belt 2009
Troy Trojans Troy Veterans Memorial Stadium Sun Belt 1909
UAB Blazers Birmingham Protective Stadium C-USA [lower-alpha 2] 1991
  1. Jacksonville State will move to C-USA in 2023.
  2. UAB will move to the American Athletic Conference in 2023.

Arizona

TeamNicknameCityStadiumCurrent conferenceFirst played
Arizona Wildcats Tucson Arizona Stadium Pac-12 1899
Arizona State Sun Devils Tempe Sun Devil Stadium Pac-12 1897

Arkansas

TeamNicknameCityStadiumCurrent conferenceFirst played
Arkansas Razorbacks Fayetteville Donald W. Reynolds Razorback Stadium [lower-alpha 1] SEC 1894
Arkansas State Red Wolves Jonesboro Centennial Bank Stadium Sun Belt 1911
  1. Arkansas also plays select home games at War Memorial Stadium in Little Rock.

California

TeamNicknameCityStadiumCurrent conferenceFirst played
California Golden Bears Berkeley California Memorial Stadium Pac-12 1886
Fresno State Bulldogs Fresno Valley Children's Stadium MW 1921
San Diego State Aztecs San Diego Snapdragon Stadium MW 1921
San Jose State Spartans San José CEFCU Stadium MW 1893
Stanford Cardinal Stanford Stanford Stadium Pac-12 1891
UCLA Bruins Pasadena Rose Bowl Pac-12 [lower-alpha 1] 1919
USC Trojans Los Angeles Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum Pac-12 [lower-alpha 2] 1888
  1. UCLA will move to the Big Ten Conference in 2024.
  2. USC will move to the Big Ten Conference in 2024.

Colorado

TeamNicknameCityStadiumCurrent conferenceFirst played
Air Force Falcons Colorado Springs Falcon Stadium MW 1955
Colorado Buffaloes Boulder Folsom Field Pac-12 1890
Colorado State Rams Fort Collins Canvas Stadium MW 1890

Connecticut

TeamNicknameCityStadiumCurrent conferenceFirst played
UConn Huskies East Hartford Pratt & Whitney Stadium Independent 1896

    Florida

    TeamNicknameCityStadiumCurrent conferenceFirst played
    FIU Panthers University Park Riccardo Silva Stadium C-USA 2002
    Florida Gators Gainesville Ben Hill Griffin Stadium SEC 1906
    Florida Atlantic Owls Boca Raton FAU Stadium C-USA [lower-alpha 1] 2001
    Florida State Seminoles Tallahassee Doak Campbell Stadium ACC 1902
    Miami Hurricanes Miami Gardens Hard Rock Stadium ACC 1926
    South Florida Bulls Tampa Raymond James Stadium The American 1997
    UCF Knights Orlando FBC Mortgage Stadium The American [lower-alpha 2] 1979
    1. Florida Atlantic will move to The American in 2023.
    2. UCF will move to the Big 12 Conference in 2023.

    Georgia

    TeamNicknameCityStadiumCurrent conferenceFirst played
    Georgia Bulldogs Athens Sanford Stadium SEC 1892
    Georgia Southern Eagles Statesboro Paulson Stadium Sun Belt 1924
    Georgia State Panthers Atlanta Center Parc Stadium Sun Belt 2010
    Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets Atlanta Bobby Dodd Stadium ACC 1892

    Hawaii

    TeamNicknameCityStadiumCurrent conferenceFirst played
    Hawaii Rainbow Warriors Honolulu Ching Athletics Complex [lower-alpha 1] MW 1909
    1. Temporary stadium during the demolition of the current Aloha Stadium, also in Honolulu, and its replacement by a new stadium on part of that venue's site. The new Aloha Stadium is currently scheduled to open in 2024.

    Idaho

    TeamNicknameCityStadiumCurrent conferenceFirst played
    Boise State Broncos Boise Albertsons Stadium MW 1933

    Illinois

    TeamNicknameCityStadiumCurrent conferenceFirst played
    Illinois Fighting Illini Champaign Memorial Stadium Big Ten 1890
    Northern Illinois Huskies DeKalb Huskie Stadium MAC 1899
    Northwestern Wildcats Evanston Ryan Field Big Ten 1876

    Indiana

    TeamNicknameCityStadiumCurrent conferenceFirst played
    Ball State Cardinals Muncie Scheumann Stadium MAC 1924
    Indiana Hoosiers Bloomington Memorial Stadium Big Ten 1887
    Notre Dame Fighting Irish Notre Dame Notre Dame Stadium Independent 1887
    Purdue Boilermakers West Lafayette Ross–Ade Stadium Big Ten 1887

    Iowa

    TeamNicknameCityStadiumCurrent conferenceFirst played
    Iowa Hawkeyes Iowa City Kinnick Stadium Big Ten 1889
    Iowa State Cyclones Ames Jack Trice Stadium Big 12 1891

    Kansas

    TeamNicknameCityStadiumCurrent conferenceFirst played
    Kansas Jayhawks Lawrence David Booth Kansas Memorial Stadium Big 12 1890
    Kansas State Wildcats Manhattan Bill Snyder Family Football Stadium Big 12 1896

    Kentucky

    TeamNicknameCityStadiumCurrent conferenceFirst played
    Kentucky Wildcats Lexington Kroger Field SEC 1881
    Louisville Cardinals Louisville Cardinal Stadium ACC 1910
    Western Kentucky Hilltoppers Bowling Green Houchens Industries–L. T. Smith Stadium C-USA 1908

    Louisiana

    TeamNicknameCityStadiumCurrent conferenceFirst played
    Louisiana Ragin' Cajuns Lafayette Cajun Field Sun Belt 1902
    Louisiana Tech Bulldogs Ruston Joe Aillet Stadium C-USA 1901
    LSU Tigers Baton Rouge Tiger Stadium SEC 1893
    Tulane Green Wave New Orleans Yulman Stadium The American 1893
    UL Monroe Warhawks Monroe JPS Field at Malone Stadium Sun Belt 1931

    Maryland

    TeamNicknameCityStadiumCurrent conferenceFirst played
    Maryland Terrapins College Park Maryland Stadium Big Ten 1888
    Navy Midshipmen Annapolis Navy–Marine Corps Memorial Stadium The American 1879

    Massachusetts

    TeamNicknameCityStadiumCurrent conferenceFirst played
    Boston College Eagles Chestnut Hill Alumni Stadium ACC 1893
    UMass Minutemen Amherst Warren McGuirk Alumni Stadium Independent 1879

    Michigan

    TeamNicknameCityStadiumCurrent conferenceFirst played
    Central Michigan Chippewas Mount Pleasant Kelly/Shorts Stadium MAC 1896
    Eastern Michigan Eagles Ypsilanti Rynearson Stadium MAC 1891
    Michigan Wolverines Ann Arbor Michigan Stadium Big Ten 1879
    Michigan State Spartans East Lansing Spartan Stadium Big Ten 1885
    Western Michigan Broncos Kalamazoo Waldo Stadium MAC 1905

    Minnesota

    TeamNicknameCityStadiumCurrent conferenceFirst played
    Minnesota Golden Gophers Minneapolis Huntington Bank Stadium Big Ten 1882

    Mississippi

    TeamNicknameCityStadiumCurrent conferenceFirst played
    Mississippi State Bulldogs Starkville [lower-alpha 1] Davis Wade Stadium SEC 1895
    Ole Miss Rebels Oxford Vaught–Hemingway Stadium SEC 1890
    Southern Miss Golden Eagles Hattiesburg M. M. Roberts Stadium Sun Belt 1912
    1. Almost all of the Mississippi State campus, including the university's athletic facilities, is located in a part of unincorporated Oktibbeha County that is designated by the United States Postal Service as Mississippi State, Mississippi.

    Missouri

    TeamNicknameCityStadiumCurrent conferenceFirst played
    Missouri Tigers Columbia Faurot Field SEC 1890

    Nebraska

    TeamNicknameCityStadiumCurrent conferenceFirst played
    Nebraska Cornhuskers Lincoln Memorial Stadium Big Ten 1890

    Nevada

    TeamNicknameCityStadiumCurrent conferenceFirst played
    Nevada Wolf Pack Reno Mackay Stadium MW 1896
    UNLV Rebels Paradise Allegiant Stadium MW 1968

    New Jersey

    TeamNicknameCityStadiumCurrent conferenceFirst played
    Rutgers Scarlet Knights Piscataway SHI Stadium Big Ten 1869

    New Mexico

    TeamNicknameCityStadiumCurrent conferenceFirst played
    New Mexico Lobos Albuquerque University Stadium MW 1892
    New Mexico State Aggies Las Cruces Aggie Memorial Stadium Independent [lower-alpha 1] 1893

    New York

    TeamNicknameCityStadiumCurrent conferenceFirst played
    Army Black Knights West Point Michie Stadium Independent 1890
    Buffalo Bulls Amherst University at Buffalo Stadium MAC 1894
    Syracuse Orange Syracuse JMA Wireless Dome ACC 1889

    North Carolina

    TeamNicknameCityStadiumCurrent conferenceFirst played
    Appalachian State Mountaineers Boone Kidd Brewer Stadium Sun Belt 1928
    Charlotte 49ers Charlotte Jerry Richardson Stadium C-USA [lower-alpha 2] 2013
    Duke Blue Devils Durham Wallace Wade Stadium ACC 1888
    East Carolina Pirates Greenville Dowdy–Ficklen Stadium The American 1932
    NC State Wolfpack Raleigh Carter–Finley Stadium ACC 1892
    North Carolina Tar Heels Chapel Hill Kenan Memorial Stadium ACC 1888
    Wake Forest Demon Deacons Winston-Salem Truist Field at Wake Forest ACC 1888

    Ohio

    TeamNicknameCityStadiumCurrent conferenceFirst played
    Akron Zips Akron InfoCision Stadium–Summa Field MAC 1891
    Bowling Green Falcons Bowling Green Doyt Perry Stadium MAC 1919
    Cincinnati Bearcats Cincinnati Nippert Stadium The American [lower-alpha 3] 1885
    Kent State Golden Flashes Kent Dix Stadium MAC 1920
    Miami RedHawks Oxford Yager Stadium MAC 1888
    Ohio Bobcats Athens Peden Stadium MAC 1894
    Ohio State Buckeyes Columbus Ohio Stadium Big Ten 1889
    Toledo Rockets Toledo Glass Bowl MAC 1917
    1. New Mexico State will move to the C-USA in 2023.
    2. Charlotte will move to The American in 2023.
    3. Cincinnati will move to the Big 12 Conference in 2023.

    Oklahoma

    TeamNicknameCityStadiumCurrent conferenceFirst played
    Oklahoma Sooners Norman Gaylord Family Oklahoma Memorial Stadium Big 12 [lower-alpha 1] 1895
    Oklahoma State Cowboys Stillwater Boone Pickens Stadium Big 12 1901
    Tulsa Golden Hurricane Tulsa Skelly Field at H. A. Chapman Stadium The American 1895
    1. Oklahoma will move to the Southeastern Conference no later than 2025.

    Oregon

    TeamNicknameCityStadiumCurrent conferenceFirst played
    Oregon Ducks Eugene Autzen Stadium Pac-12 1894
    Oregon State Beavers Corvallis Reser Stadium Pac-12 1893

    Pennsylvania

    TeamNicknameCityStadiumCurrent conferenceFirst played
    Penn State Nittany Lions State College [lower-alpha 1] Beaver Stadium Big Ten 1881
    Pittsburgh Panthers Pittsburgh Acrisure Stadium ACC 1890
    Temple Owls Philadelphia Lincoln Financial Field The American 1895
    1. Most of the Penn State campus, including the football stadium, lies outside the municipality of State College, instead lying in a portion of College Township designated by the U.S. Postal Service as University Park, Pennsylvania.

    South Carolina

    TeamNicknameCityStadiumCurrent conferenceFirst played
    Clemson Tigers Clemson Memorial Stadium ACC 1896
    Coastal Carolina Chanticleers Conway Brooks Stadium Sun Belt 2003
    South Carolina Gamecocks Columbia Williams–Brice Stadium SEC 1892

    Tennessee

    TeamNicknameCityStadiumCurrent conferenceFirst played
    Memphis Tigers Memphis Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium The American 1912
    Middle Tennessee Blue Raiders Murfreesboro Johnny "Red" Floyd Stadium C-USA 1911
    Tennessee Volunteers Knoxville Neyland Stadium SEC 1891
    Vanderbilt Commodores Nashville Vanderbilt Stadium SEC 1890

    Texas

    TeamNicknameCityStadiumCurrent conferenceFirst played
    Baylor Bears Waco McLane Stadium Big 12 1899
    Houston Cougars Houston TDECU Stadium The American [lower-alpha 1] 1946
    North Texas Mean Green Denton Apogee Stadium C-USA [lower-alpha 2] 1913
    Rice Owls Houston Rice Stadium C-USA [lower-alpha 3] 1912
    Sam Houston Bearkats Huntsville Bowers Stadium WAC (FCS) [lower-alpha 4] 1912
    SMU Mustangs University Park [lower-alpha 5] Gerald J. Ford Stadium The American 1915
    TCU Horned Frogs Fort Worth Amon G. Carter Stadium Big 12 1896
    Texas Longhorns Austin Darrell K Royal–Texas Memorial Stadium Big 12 [lower-alpha 6] 1893
    Texas A&M Aggies College Station Kyle Field SEC 1894
    Texas State Bobcats San Marcos Bobcat Stadium Sun Belt 1904
    Texas Tech Red Raiders Lubbock Jones AT&T Stadium and Cody Campbell Field Big 12 1925
    UTEP Miners El Paso Sun Bowl C-USA 1914
    UTSA Roadrunners San Antonio Alamodome C-USA [lower-alpha 7] 2011
    1. Houston will move to the Big 12 Conference in 2023.
    2. North Texas will move to The American no later than 2023.
    3. Rice will move to The American no later than 2023.
    4. Sam Houston will move to C-USA in 2023.
    5. Virtually all of the SMU campus, including the football stadium, lies in University Park, which together with its neighbor Highland Park forms an enclave within the Dallas city limits. The U.S. Postal Service considers all locations within University Park (and Highland Park) to have a Dallas mailing address.
    6. Texas will move to the Southeastern Conference no later than 2025.
    7. UTSA will move to The American no later than 2023.

    Utah

    TeamNicknameCityStadiumCurrent conferenceFirst played
    BYU Cougars Provo LaVell Edwards Stadium Independent [lower-alpha 1] 1922
    Utah Utes Salt Lake City Rice–Eccles Stadium Pac-12 1892
    Utah State Aggies Logan Maverik Stadium MW 1892
    1. BYU will move to the Big 12 Conference in 2023.

    Virginia

    TeamNicknameCityStadiumCurrent conferenceFirst played
    James Madison Dukes Harrisonburg Bridgeforth Stadium Sun Belt 1972
    Liberty Flames Lynchburg Williams Stadium Independent [lower-alpha 1] 1973
    Old Dominion Monarchs Norfolk S.B. Ballard Stadium Sun Belt 2009
    Virginia Cavaliers Charlottesville Scott Stadium ACC 1888
    Virginia Tech Hokies Blacksburg Lane Stadium ACC 1892
    1. Liberty will move to C-USA in 2023.

    Washington

    TeamNicknameCityStadiumCurrent conferenceFirst played
    Washington Huskies Seattle Husky Stadium Pac-12 1889
    Washington State Cougars Pullman Martin Stadium Pac-12 1893

    West Virginia

    TeamNicknameCityStadiumCurrent conferenceFirst played
    Marshall Thundering Herd Huntington Joan C. Edwards Stadium Sun Belt 1895
    West Virginia Mountaineers Morgantown Milan Puskar Stadium Big 12 1891

      Wisconsin

      TeamNicknameCityStadiumCurrent conferenceFirst played
      Wisconsin Badgers Madison Camp Randall Stadium Big Ten 1889

      Wyoming

      TeamNicknameCityStadiumCurrent conferenceFirst played
      Wyoming Cowboys Laramie War Memorial Stadium MW 1893

      See also

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