1979 NCAA Division I-AA football season

Last updated
1979 NCAA Division I-AA season
NCAA logo.svg
Regular season
Number of teams41
DurationAugust–November
Playoff
DurationDecember 8–December 15
Championship date December 15, 1979
Championship site Orlando Stadium
Orlando, Florida
Champion Eastern Kentucky
NCAA Division I-AA football seasons
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The 1979 NCAA Division I-AA football season, part of college football in the United States organized by the National Collegiate Athletic Association at the Division I-AA level, began in August 1979, and concluded with the 1979 NCAA Division I-AA Football Championship Game on December 15, 1979, at Orlando Stadium in Orlando, Florida. The Eastern Kentucky Colonels won their first I-AA championship, defeating the Lehigh Engineers by a final score of 30−7. [1]

Contents

Conference changes and new programs

School1978 Conference1979 Conference
Bethune–Cookman SIAC (II) MEAC (I-AA)
East Tennessee State Ohio Valley (I-AA) Southern (I-A)
Florida A&M SIAC (II) MEAC (I-AA)
Morgan State MEAC (I-AA) D-II Independent
Nevada I-AA Independent Big Sky
North Carolina Central MEAC (I-AA) CIAA (D-II)

Conference standings

1979 Big Sky Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Boise State *700  1010
No. 9 Montana State $610  640
No. 5 Nevada ^520  840
Northern Arizona 340  740
Weber State 340  380
Idaho 250  470
Montana 250  370
Idaho State 070  0110
  • $ Conference champion
  • ^ NCAA Division I-AA playoff participant
  • * – Boise State was ineligible for conference title or I-AA playoffs.
Rankings from NCAA Division I-AA AP Poll
1979 Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Morgan State $500  920
South Carolina State 410  830
North Carolina A&T 221  461
Howard 230  560
Delaware State 141  451
North Carolina Central 140  281
Maryland Eastern Shore 000  371
  • $ Conference champion
  • Maryland Eastern Shore games did not count as conference games in 1979
1979 Ohio Valley Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
No. 2 Murray State $^600  921
No. 3 Eastern Kentucky ^510  1120
Morehead State 321  541
Western Kentucky 330  550
Austin Peay 240  740
Middle Tennessee 150  190
Tennessee Tech 051  182
  • $ Conference champion
  • ^ NCAA Division I-AA playoff participant
Rankings from Associated Press poll
1979 Southwestern Athletic Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
Team W L    W L 
No. 1 Grambling State + 51    83 
No. 6 Alcorn State + 51    82 
No. 8 Jackson State  42    83 
No. T–10 Southern  42    74 
Mississippi Valley State  24    45 
Texas Southern  15    38 
Prairie View A&M  06    011 
  • + Conference co-champions
Rankings from Associated Press poll
1979 Yankee Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
No. 7 Boston University +410  811
UMass +410  640
Connecticut 311  362
New Hampshire 221  542
Maine 140  191
Rhode Island 050  290
  • + Conference co-champions
Rankings from Associated Press poll
1979 NCAA Division I-AA independents football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
No. 4 Lehigh ^000  1030
Portland State 000  650
Lafayette 000  532
Bucknell 000  442
Northwestern State 000  360
Northeastern 000  370
  • ^ NCAA Division I-AA playoff participant
Rankings from Associated Press poll

Conference champions

Conference champions

Big Sky Conference – Montana State
Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference – Morgan State
Ohio Valley Conference – Murray State
Southwestern Athletic Conference – Alcorn State and Grambling State
Yankee Conference – Boston University and Massachusetts

Postseason

NCAA Division I-AA Playoff bracket

The bracket consisted of three regional selections (West, East, and South) plus Eastern Kentucky as an at-large selection. [2]

Semifinals
December 8
Campus Sites
National Championship Game
December 15
Orlando Stadium
Orlando, Florida
      
East Lehigh 28
South Murray State* 9
East Lehigh 7
AtLg Eastern Kentucky30
West Nevada 30
AtLg Eastern Kentucky * 33**

*Next to name denotes host institution
*Next to score denotes overtimes

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References

  1. "1979 NCAA Division I Football Championship" (PDF). NCAA.org. p. 14. Retrieved December 29, 2013.
  2. "Eastern Kentucky Gains Football Playoff Berth". The Tennessean . Nashville, Tennessee. December 3, 1979. p. 36. Retrieved February 9, 2019 via newspapers.com.