1974 NCAA Division I football season

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The 1974 NCAA Division I football season finished with two national champions. The Associated Press (AP) writers' poll ranked the University of Oklahoma, which was on probation and barred by the NCAA from postseason play, No. 1 at season's end. The United Press International (UPI) coaches' poll did not rank teams on probation, by unanimous agreement of the 25 member coaches' board. [2] The UPI trophy went to the University of Southern California (USC).

Contents

During the 20th century, the NCAA had no playoff for the major college football teams, later known as "Division I-A". The NCAA Football Guide, however, did note an "unofficial national champion" based on the top ranked teams in the "wire service" (AP and UPI) polls. The "writers' poll" by Associated Press (AP) was the most popular, followed by the "coaches' poll" by United Press International) (UPI). Starting in 1974, the UPI joined AP in issuing its final poll after the bowl games were completed. Both polls operated under a point system of 20 points for first place, 19 for second, etc., whereby the overall ranking was determined. The AP poll consisted of the votes of 60 writers, though not all voted in each poll, and the UPI poll was taken of a 25-member board.

Rule changes

Conference and program changes

School1973 Conference1974 Conference
Cal State Los Angeles Golden Eagles PCAA (D-I) CCAA (D-II)
Cal State Fullerton Titans CCAA (D-II) PCAA (D-I)
Xavier Musketeers IndependentDropped Program

September

In the preseason poll released on September 2, 1974, the AP ranked Oklahoma No. 1, followed by No. 2 Ohio State, No. 3 Notre Dame, No. 4 Alabama and No. 5 USC.

September 7 No. 3 Notre Dame, the defending national champion, beat Georgia Tech in Atlanta, 31–7, in a nationally televised game on Monday night, September 9. Arizona State, UCLA and Houston were among the few other schools playing that weekend. Elsewhere, the scheduled Ole Miss-Tulane game in New Orleans was postponed until November 30 due to the threat of Hurricane Carmen. The poll was: 1.Oklahoma 2.Notre Dame 3.Alabama 4.Ohio State 5.USC

September 14 No. 1 Oklahoma beat Baylor, 28–11. No. 2 Notre Dame was idle. No. 3 Alabama won at No. 14 Maryland, 21–16. No. 4 Ohio State won at Minnesota, 34–19. No. 5 USC lost to Arkansas in Little Rock, 22–7. No. 7 Nebraska, which beat Oregon in its opener, 61–7, rose to fourth. The poll was 1.Notre Dame 2.Ohio State 3.Oklahoma 4.Nebraska 5.Alabama

September 21 No. 1 Notre Dame won at Northwestern, 49–3. No. 2 Ohio State beat Oregon State 51–10. No. 3 Oklahoma was idle. No. 4 Nebraska lost at Wisconsin, 21–20. No. 5 Alabama beat Southern Mississippi at Alabama, 52–0. No. 6 Michigan, which beat Colorado, 31–0, rose to fifth. The poll was 1.Notre Dame 2.Ohio State 3.Oklahoma 4.Alabama 5.Michigan

September 28 No. 1 Notre Dame was upset at home by Purdue, 31–20. No. 2 Ohio State defeated SMU, 28–9. No. 3 Oklahoma rolled over visiting Utah State, 72–3.No. 4 Alabama beat Vanderbilt 23–10. No. 5 Michigan beat Navy, 52–0 No. 9 Texas A&M, which won at Washington 28–15, rose to fifth. The poll was 1.Ohio State 2.Oklahoma 3.Alabama 4.Michigan 5.Texas A & M

October

October 5 No. 1 Ohio State beat Washington State 42–7 in Seattle. No. 2 Oklahoma shut out Wake Forest 63–0. No. 3 Alabama beat Mississippi at Jackson, 35–21. No. 4 Michigan won at Stanford, 27–16. No. 5 Texas A&M lost at Kansas, 28–10. No. 6 Nebraska, which beat Minnesota 54–0, rose to fifth. The poll was 1.Ohio State 2.Oklahoma 3.Alabama 4.Michigan 5.Nebraska

October 12 No. 1 Ohio State beat visiting No. 13 Wisconsin 52–7. No. 2 Oklahoma barely defeated No. 17 Texas in Dallas, 16–13. No. 3 Alabama survived a game against winless (0–4–0)Florida State, winning 8–7 No. 4 Michigan beat Michigan State, 21–7. No. 5 Nebraska lost to Missouri, 21–10. No. 10 Auburn, which beat Kentucky 31–13, rose to fifth. The poll was 1.Ohio State 2.Oklahoma 3.Michigan 4.Alabama 5.Auburn

October 19 No. 1 Ohio State beat Indiana, 49–9 No. 2 Oklahoma won at Colorado, 49–14. No. 3 Michigan won at Wisconsin, 24–20. No. 4 Alabama won at Tennessee, 28–6. No. 5 Auburn beat Georgia Tech 31–22. The poll was unchanged: 1.Ohio State 2.Oklahoma 3.Michigan 4.Alabama 5.Auburn

October 26 No. 1 Ohio State won at Northwestern, 55–7. No. 2 Oklahoma beat Kansas State, 63–0. No. 3 Michigan beat Minnesota, 49–0. No. 4 Alabama beat TCU 41–3 at Birmingham. No. 5 Auburn beat Florida State 38–6. The poll was unchanged 1.Ohio State 2.Oklahoma 3.Michigan 4.Alabama 5.Auburn

November

November 2 No. 1 Ohio State defeated Illinois at home, 49–7. With a record of 8–0–0, the Buckeyes had outscored their opposition 360 to 75. No. 2 Oklahoma won at Iowa State, 28–10. No. 3 Michigan won at Indiana, 21–7. No. 4 Alabama beat No. 17 Mississippi State 35–0, and thereby jumped over Michigan to No. 3. No. 5 Auburn lost at No. 11 Florida, 25–14. No. 8 Texas A&M, which beat Arkansas 20–10, returned to the Top Five. The poll was 1.Ohio State 2.Oklahoma 3.Alabama 4.Michigan 5.Texas A & M

November 9 In East Lansing, Michigan, No. 1 Ohio State was upset by unranked (and 4–3–1) Michigan State, 16–13. No. 2 Oklahoma, which had beaten Missouri 37–0, took the first spot. No. 3 Alabama beat LSU in Birmingham, 30–0. No. 4 Michigan won at Illinois, 14–6. No. 5 Texas A&M lost at SMU, 18–14. No. 8 Notre Dame was idle, but rose to fifth place. The AP poll was 1.Oklahoma 2.Alabama 3.Michigan 4.Ohio State 5.Notre Dame while the UPI poll was 1.Alabama 2.Michigan 3.Ohio State 4.Notre Dame 5.USC

November 16 No. 1 Oklahoma won at Kansas, 45–14. No. 2 Alabama won in Florida over Miami, 28–7. The other Miami, Miami University, was ranked 12th with a record of 8–0–1. No. 3 Michigan beat Purdue, 51–0, to extend its record to 10–0–0. No. 4 Ohio State won at Iowa, 35–10. No. 5 Notre Dame beat No. 17 Pittsburgh, 14–10. The AP poll was unchanged: 1.Oklahoma 2.Alabama 3.Michigan 4.Ohio State 5.Notre Dame, while the UPI poll was 1.Alabama 2.Michigan 3.Ohio State 4.Notre Dame 5.USC

November 23 No. 1 Oklahoma beat No. 6 Nebraska, 28–14. No. 2 Alabama was idle as it prepared for its season ender with Auburn. The game that determined the Big Ten championship took place in Columbus, Ohio, as No. 3 Michigan (10–0–0) met No. 4 Ohio State (10–1–0). OSU won, 12–10. No. 5 Notre Dame beat Air Force, 38–0. USC topped UCLA 34–9 for the Pac-8 title and Rose Bowl berth. The AP poll was 1.Oklahoma 2.Alabama 3.Ohio State 4.Notre Dame 5.USC and the UPI poll was 1.Alabama 2.Ohio State 3.Notre Dame 4.USC 5.Michigan

The annual Alabama-Auburn game took place on a Friday night, played in Birmingham on November 29, with No. 2 Alabama winning 17–13 over No. 7 Auburn to close its season at 11–0–0. On November 30 No. 1 Oklahoma won its annual season ender against OK State, 44–13, to also close its season 11–0–0. Alabama would go to the Sugar Bowl, while Oklahoma would stay home due to NCAA probation. No. 4 Notre Dame met No. 5 USC in Los Angeles. USC won, 55–24 after trailing 24–0, and reached the Top four.

In other action, Tulane lost its final game at Tulane Stadium 26–10 to Ole Miss. The Green Wave played 38 of their next 39 seasons at the Superdome, except for 2005, when they were forced to play all of their games away from New Orleans in the wake of Hurricane Katrina. Tulane returned to campus in 2014 when Yulman Stadium opened.

The AP poll was 1.Oklahoma 2.Alabama 3.Ohio State 4.USC 5.Michigan and the UPI poll was 1.Alabama 2.Ohio State 3.USC 4.Michigan 5.Auburn.

Oklahoma and Alabama, both 11–0–0, were the only undefeated and untied teams at season's end. AP ranked Oklahoma first, and UPI ranked Alabama No. 1.

Conference standings

1974 Atlantic Coast Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
No. 13 Maryland $600  840
No. 11 NC State 420  921
Clemson 420  740
North Carolina 420  750
Duke 240  650
Virginia 150  470
Wake Forest 060  1100
  • $ Conference champion
Rankings from AP Poll [3]
1974 Big Eight Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
No. 1 Oklahoma $700  1100
Missouri 520  740
No. 9 Nebraska 520  930
Oklahoma State 430  750
Colorado 340  560
Iowa State 250  470
Kansas 160  470
Kansas State 160  470
  • $ Conference champion
Rankings from AP Poll
1974 Big Ten Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
No. 4 Ohio State +710  1020
No. 3 Michigan +710  1010
No. 12 Michigan State 611  731
Wisconsin 530  740
Illinois 431  641
Purdue 350  461
Minnesota 260  470
Iowa 260  380
Northwestern 260  380
Indiana 170  1100
  • + Conference co-champions
Rankings from AP Poll
1974 Ivy League football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Harvard +610  720
Yale +610  810
Penn 421  621
Brown 430  540
Dartmouth 340  360
Princeton 340  441
Cornell 151  351
Columbia 070  180
  • + Conference co-champions
1974 Mid-American Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
No. 10 Miami $500  1001
Ohio 320  650
Toledo 320  650
Kent State 230  740
Bowling Green 230  641
Western Michigan 050  380
  • $ Conference champion
Rankings from AP Poll
1974 Missouri Valley Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Tulsa $600  830
Louisville 320  470
West Texas State 330  650
Drake 231  371
New Mexico State 230  560
North Texas State 132  272
Wichita State 141  191
  • $ Conference champion
1974 Pacific Coast Athletic Association football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
San Diego State $400  821
San Jose State 220  831
Pacific (CA) 220  650
Long Beach State 130  650
Fresno State 130  570
  • $ Conference champion
1974 Pacific-8 Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
No. 2 USC $601  1011
Stanford 511  542
California 421  731
UCLA 421  632
Washington 340  560
Oregon State 340  380
Washington State 160  290
Oregon 070  290
  • $ Conference champion
Rankings from AP Poll
1974 Southern Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
Team W L    W L 
VMI $ 51    74 
Appalachian State  41    65 
East Carolina  33    74 
Richmond  33    55 
The Citadel  34    47 
William & Mary  23    47 
Furman  24    56 
Davidson  03    27 
  • $ Conference champion
1974 Southeastern Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
No. 5 Alabama $600  1110
No. 8 Auburn 420  1020
Georgia 420  660
No. 17 Mississippi State 330  930
No. 15 Florida 330  840
Kentucky 330  650
No. 20 Tennessee 231  732
Vanderbilt 231  732
LSU 240  551
Ole Miss 060  380
  • $ Conference champion
Rankings from AP Poll
1974 Southwest Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
No. 14 Baylor $610  840
No. 17 Texas 520  840
No. 16 Texas A&M 520  830
Arkansas 331  641
SMU 331  641
Texas Tech 340  642
Rice 250  281
TCU 070  1100
  • $ Conference champion
Rankings from AP Poll
1974 Western Athletic Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
BYU $601  741
Arizona 610  920
Arizona State 430  750
New Mexico 340  461
UTEP 340  470
Colorado State 231  461
Utah 150  1100
Wyoming 160  290
  • $ Conference champion
1974 NCAA Division I independents football records
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
No. 6 Notre Dame     1020
No. 7 Penn State     1020
Temple     820
Boston College     830
Utah State     830
No. 19 Houston     831
Rutgers     731
Cincinnati     740
Memphis State     740
Pittsburgh     740
Georgia Tech     650
Hawaii     650
Miami (FL)     650
Southern Miss     650
Tampa     650
Holy Cross     551
Tulane     560
Colgate     460
Northern Illinois     470
Navy     470
South Carolina     470
Virginia Tech     70
West Virginia     470
Army     380
Dayton     380
Villanova     380
Air Force     290
Southern Illinois     290
Syracuse     290
Florida State     1100
Marshall     1100
Rankings from AP Poll

Bowl games

Wednesday, January 1, 1975

Major bowls

BOWL
COTTON No. 7 Penn State Nittany Lions 41No. 12 Baylor Bears 20
SUGAR No. 8 Nebraska Cornhuskers 13No. 18 Florida Gators 10
ROSE No. 4 USC Trojans 18No. 3 Ohio State Buckeyes 17
ORANGE No. 9 Notre Dame Fighting Irish 13No. 2 Alabama Crimson Tide 11

Nebraska erased a 10-point deficit by defeating Florida in the Sugar Bowl played on New Year's Eve. The following afternoon, Penn State defeated the surprise SWC champion Baylor in the Cotton Bowl. Third-ranked Ohio State (led by Woody Hayes) and No. 4 USC (coached by John McKay) played in the Rose Bowl before a crowd of 106,721 in Pasadena. Ohio State led 7–3 after three quarters, and 17–10 in the closing minutes. With 2:03 left, Pat Haden fired a 38-yard pass to John McKay Jr. (son of USC's coach) to make the score 17–16. Coach McKay then passed up a chance for a tie over the favored Buckeyes, and ordered the Trojans to go for two. Shelton Diggs dove and caught Haden's low pass in the end zone to give USC an 18–17 lead. Ohio State could only get close enough for a desperation 62-yard field goal attempt that fell about 8 yards short as time expired. [4]

Alabama, coached by Bear Bryant was ranked No. 1 in the UPI poll, and No. 2 (behind on-probation Oklahoma) in the AP, as it went to the Orange Bowl, where it faced 9th ranked Notre Dame, playing its final game under Ara Parseghian. The Irish went out to a 13–0 lead early in the game, but Bama battled back with a field goal, a touchdown and a two-point run to close the score to 13–11 with three minutes left. After ruling out an onside kick attempt, the Tide force a Notre Dame punt and got the ball back with 1:37 left. Quarterback Richard Todd attempted to drive the team to field goal range, but he threw his 3rd interception of the game, and Notre Dame ran out the clock to preserve the upset win.

In the final polls, USC was ranked first by UPI, followed by Alabama, Ohio State, Michigan, and Notre Dame. The Trojans were second in the AP poll, where the Oklahoma Sooners were the first place choice for 51 of the 60 writers. The NCAA recognized both the Sooners and the Trojans as champions in its football guide.

Other bowls

BOWLCityStateDateWinnerScoreRunner-up
SUN El PasoTexasDecember 28 Mississippi State 26–24 North Carolina
GATOR JacksonvilleFloridaDecember 30No. 6 Auburn 27–3No. 11 Texas
TANGERINE OrlandoFloridaDecember 21No. 15 Miami (Ohio) 21–10 Georgia
ASTRO-BLUEBONNET HoustonTexasDecember 23 Houston (tie)31–31No. 13 N.C. State (tie)
LIBERTY MemphisTennesseeDecember 16 Tennessee   7–3No. 10 Maryland
PEACH AtlantaGeorgiaDecember 28 Texas Tech (tie)  6–6 Vanderbilt (tie)
FIESTA TempeArizonaDecember 28 Oklahoma State 16–6No. 17 BYU

Heisman Trophy

  1. Archie Griffin , RB - Ohio State, 1,920 points
  2. Anthony Davis, RB - USC, 819
  3. Joe Washington, RB - Oklahoma, 661
  4. Tom Clements, QB - Notre Dame, 244
  5. David Humm, QB - Nebraska, 210
  6. Dennis Franklin, QB - Michigan, 100
  7. Rod Shoate, LB -Oklahoma, 97
  8. Gary Sheide, QB - BYU, 90
  9. Randy White, DT - Maryland, 85
  10. Steve Bartkowski, QB - California, 74

Source: [5] [6]

See also

Related Research Articles

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References

  1. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2011-10-02. Retrieved 2008-12-30.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  2. "UPI Coaches Omitting Oklahoma," Mansfield (O.) News Journal, Sep. 24, 1974, p19
  3. "1974 Atlantic Coast Conference Year Summary". sports-reference.com. Retrieved January 25, 2013.
  4. "The Great Gamble Pays Off In Trojan Win," Star-News (Pasadena), January 2, 1975, p B-1
  5. "Archie Griffin". Heisman Trophy. 1974. Retrieved January 17, 2017.
  6. "Heisman to Griffin". Spokane Daily Chronicle. (Washington). Associated Press. December 3, 1974. p. 17.