1905 college football season

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The 1905 college football season had the Chicago Maroons retroactively named as national champion by the Billingsley Report, the Helms Athletic Foundation, the National Championship Foundation, and the Houlgate System, while Yale was named champion by Parke H. Davis and Caspar Whitney. Chicago finished the season 11–0, while Yale finished 10–0. The Official NCAA Division I Football Records Book listed both Chicago and Yale as having been selected national champions. [1]

Contents

Conference and program changes

Membership changes

School1904 Conference1905 Conference
Western State Normal Hilltoppers Program EstablishedIndependent

Notable games

Chicago vs. Michigan game

Western Championship Chicago Michigan, November 1905.jpg

In the final game of the season on November 30, 1905, Amos Alonzo Stagg's Chicago team and Fielding Yost's Michigan squad met in a battle of undefeated Western Conference powerhouses. The teams played at Chicago's Marshall Field in front of 27,000 spectators, at that time the largest crowd to view a football game. Michigan was 120 and had a 56-game undefeated streak on the line, while Chicago was 100.

The game was a punting duel between Chicago's All-American Walter Eckersall and Michigan's John Garrels and was scoreless until early in the third quarter when a Michigan punt and Chicago penalty pinned Chicago inside their own ten-yard line. On third down, as Eckersall attempted to punt, he encountered a fearsome rush, but evaded the Michigan tacklers and was able to scramble to the 22-yard line and a first down. After three more first downs, the drive stalled and Chicago was forced to punt again. Eckersall's booming punt carried into the end zone where it was caught by Michigan's William Dennison Clark who attempted to run the ball out. He advanced the ball forward to the one-yard line, but was hit hard by Art Badenoch and then was brought back inside his own end zone by Mark Catlin for a two-point safety. Under the rules of the time, forward progress was not credited, and a ball carrier could be carried backwards or forwards until he was down. The rest of third and fourth quarters continued as a defensive stalemate. Chicago's 20 victory snapped Michigan's 56-game unbeaten streak and gave Chicago the consensus national championship for 1905.

As a tragic note to this game, Clark received the blame for the Michigan loss, and in 1932 he shot himself through the heart. In a suicide note to his wife he reportedly expressed the hope that his "final play" would be of some benefit in atoning for his error at Marshall Field.

Night football

During the season, the first night football game west of the Mississippi was played in Wichita, Kansas between Fairmount College (now Wichita State University and Cooper College (now Sterling College). The Coleman Company provided lights for the game. [2]

Rule experiment

On December 25 in Wichita, Kansas an experimental game was played between Fairmount College and Washburn University. The game tested a rule change that required the offense to earn a first down in three plays instead of four. Football legend John H. Outland officiated the game and commented, "It seems to me that the distance required in three downs would almost eliminate touchdowns, except through fakes or flukes." [3] The Los Angeles Times reported that there was much kicking and that the game was considered much safer than regular play, but that the new rule was not "conducive to the sport." [4] Some of the rules for this game were based on the Burnside rules which govern the Canadian game.

Conference standings

Major conference standings

1905 Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Vanderbilt $500  710
Georgia Tech 501  601
LSU 200  300
Sewanee 311  421
Clemson 321  321
Alabama 440  640
Cumberland (TN) 220  340
Nashville 000  020
Auburn 230  240
Mississippi A&M 140  340
Tulane 010  010
Ole Miss 020  020
Tennessee 041  351
Georgia 050  150
  • $ Conference champion
1905 Southwestern Intercollegiate Athletic Association football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Oklahoma 300  720
Texas 410  541
Texas A&M 510  720
Oklahoma A&M 110  132
TCU 340  440
Arkansas 010  260
Baylor 160  160
Trinity      
1905 Western Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Chicago $700  1100
Michigan 210  1210
Minnesota 210  1010
Purdue 111  611
Wisconsin 120  820
Indiana 011  811
Iowa 020  820
Northwestern 020  821
Illinois 030  540
  • $ Conference champion

Independents

1905 Eastern college football independents records
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Yale     1000
Penn     1201
Temple     201
Dartmouth     712
Swarthmore     710
Western U. of Penn.     1020
Princeton     820
Harvard     821
Lafayette     721
Wesleyan     721
Carlisle     1040
Washington & Jefferson     930
Penn State     830
Syracuse     830
Fordham     520
Amherst     312
Brown     740
Tufts     530
Cornell     640
Colgate     540
Columbia     432
Army     441
NYU     331
Lehigh     670
Frankin & Marshall     460
Geneva     460
New Hampshire     242
Rutgers     360
Villanova     370
Drexel     070
1905 Midwestern college football independents records
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Detroit College     100
Kansas     1010
Central Michigan     710
Doane     510
Nebraska     920
Saint Louis     720
Butler     721
Kansas State     620
Iowa State     630
Washington University     631
Wittenberg     740
Heidelberg     640
Iowa State Normal     532
Cincinnati     430
Missouri     540
Notre Dame     540
Fairmount     541
Lake Forest     650
Michigan State Normal     440
Wabash     660
Marquette     340
Ohio     252
DePauw     360
Mount Union     260
North Dakota Agricultural     141
Baldwin–Wallace     010
St. Mary's (OH)     030
1905 Southern college football independents records
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Stetson     401
VPI     910
Navy     1011
Grant     610
Kentucky University     703
Oklahoma     720
Washington and Lee     720
North Carolina A&M     411
West Virginia     630
South Carolina     421
Maryland     640
Central State Normal     431
North Carolina     431
Virginia     540
Catholic University     001
TCU     440
Delaware     341
The Citadel     231
Richmond     352
William & Mary     241
Oklahoma A&M     132
VMI     251
Davidson     250
Arkansas     260
Kendall     130
Georgetown     270
Baylor     160
1905 Far West college football independents records
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Stanford     800
New Mexico A&M     300
New Mexico     511
Utah     620
California     412
Oregon Agricultural     630
USC     631
Arizona     420
Oregon     422
Washington     422
Washington State     440
Utah Agricultural     221
Wyoming     340
Montana     230
Nevada State     031
Tempe Normal     030

Minor conferences

ConferenceChampion(s)Record
Michigan Intercollegiate Athletic Association Michigan Agricultural 5–0
Ohio Athletic Conference Case 4–0–1

Minor conference standings

1905 Michigan Intercollegiate Athletic Association football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Michigan Agricultural +     920
  • + Conference co-champions
1905 Ohio Athletic Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Case $401  811
Ohio State 201  822
Oberlin 230  360
Western Reserve 120  630
Kenyon 130  550
Ohio Wesleyan 130  460
  • $ Conference champion

Awards and honors

All-Americans

The consensus All-America team included:

PositionNameHeightWeight (lbs.)ClassHometownTeam
QB Walter Eckersall 5'7"141Jr. Chicago, Illinois Chicago
QB Guy Hutchinson Yale
HB Jack Hubbard Sr. Amherst
HB Daniel Hurley Sr.. Charlestown, Massachusetts Harvard
HB Howard Roome Jr. Yale
HB Henry Torney Sr. Army
FB James B. McCormick So. Princeton
E Mark Catlin Sr. Sr. Chicago
E Tom Shevlin 5'10"195Sr. Minneapolis, Minnesota Yale
T Karl Brill So. Harvard
T Beaton Squires Sr. Harvard
G Francis Burr Jr. Brookline, Massachusetts Harvard
C Robert Torrey Sr. Montclair, New Jersey Penn
G Roswell Tripp Sr. Yale
T Otis Lamson Sr. Penn
E Ralph Glaze 5'8"153Sr. Dartmouth

See also

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References

  1. Official 2009 NCAA Division I Football Records Book (PDF). Indianapolis, IN: The National Collegiate Athletic Association. August 2009. p. 70. Retrieved 2009-10-16.
  2. "FIRST LIGHT (1900 – 1929)". Coleman Company. Archived from the original on March 18, 2013. Retrieved October 13, 2015.
  3. New York Times "Ten Yard Rule a Failure" December 26, 1905
  4. Los Angeles Times "New Football Rules Tested" December 26, 1905