1899 college football season

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The 1899 college football season had no clear-cut champion, with the Official NCAA Division I Football Records Book listing Harvard and Princeton as having been selected national champions. [1]

Contents

Chicago and Sewanee went undefeated. With just 13 players, the Sewanee team, known as the "Iron Men", had a six-day road trip with five shutout wins over Texas A&M; Texas; Tulane; LSU; and Ole Miss. Sportswriter Grantland Rice called the group "the most durable football team I ever saw." [2]

Conference and program changes

Conference establishments

Membership changes

School1898 Conference1899 Conference
Arizona Varsity Program EstablishedIndependent
Baylor football Program EstablishedIndependent
Davidson Wildcats Independent SIAA
Furman Hornets Independent SIAA
Northern Illinois State Normal football Program EstablishedIndependent

Conference standings

Major conference standings

1899 Colorado Football Association standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Colorado College $200  321
Colorado 210  720
Colorado Mines 120  230
Colorado Agricultural 020  121
  • $ Conference champion
1899 Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Sewanee $1100  1200
Vanderbilt 500  720
Alabama 100  310
Nashville 310  310
Tennessee 210  620
Auburn 211  311
Texas 320  620
North Carolina 110  730
Ole Miss 340  340
Georgia 231  231
Clemson 120  420
Central (KY) 120  120
LSU 130  140
Kentucky State 010  522
SW Presbyterian 010  110
Cumberland (TN) 030  030
Georgia Tech 050  050
Tulane 050  061
  • $ Conference champion
1899 Triangular Football League standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Wesleyan $200  720
Dartmouth 020  270
  • $ Conference champion
1899 Western Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Chicago $400  1602
Wisconsin 410  920
Northwestern 220  760
Michigan 110  820
Purdue 120  441
Minnesota 030  632
Illinois 030  351
  • $ Conference champion

Independents

1899 Eastern college football independents records
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Harvard     1001
Buffalo     600
Duquesne     202
Lafayette     1210
Princeton     1210
Boston College     811
Carlisle     920
Wesleyan     720
Villanova     721
Yale     721
Western Univ. of Penn.     311
Columbia     930
Fordham     310
Cornell     730
Penn     832
Brown     731
Geneva     210
New Hampshire     420
Tufts     740
Syracuse     440
Army     450
Colgate     450
Penn State     461
Frankin & Marshall     351
Amherst     471
NYU     260
Temple     141
Rutgers     290
1899 Midwestern college football independents records
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Kansas     1000
Detroit College     500
Ohio State     901
Iowa     801
Washington University     510
Missouri     920
Mount Union     511
Indiana     620
Wabash     101
Cincinnati     520
Drake     520
Heidelberg     520
Buchtel     210
Doane     210
Notre Dame     631
Fairmount     212
Wittenberg     540
Iowa State     541
Ohio     220
Ohio Wesleyan     550
Haskell     450
Lake Forest     462
Kansas State     230
Michigan Agricultural     241
Washburn     252
Butler     130
Nebraska     171
Baldwin–Wallace     040
1899 Southern college football independents records
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
VMI     00
VPI     410
Delaware     620
Arkansas     311
Georgetown     521
Texas A&M     420
Oklahoma     210
Baylor     211
Navy     530
Virginia     432
Richmond     220
South Carolina     230
West Virginia     230
William & Mary     230
North Carolina A&M     122
Davidson     131
Maryland     140
Add-Ran     001
Marshall     001
1899 Far West college football independents records
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Montana Agricultural     300
Arizona Normal     300
New Mexico A&M     100
Utah Agricultural     100
California     711
Washington     411
Utah     210
Nevada State     320
Oregon Agricultural     320
Oregon     321
Arizona     111
Washington Agricultural     110
Montana     120
USC     231
Stanford     252
Wyoming     011

Minor conferences

ConferenceChampion(s)Record
Michigan Intercollegiate Athletic Association Kalamazoo 4–1

See also

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References

  1. Official 2009 NCAA Division I Football Records Book (PDF). Indianapolis, IN: The National Collegiate Athletic Association. August 2009. p. 70. Retrieved 2009-10-16.
  2. "Grantland Rice". Reading Eagle. November 27, 1941.