1980 NCAA Division II football season

Last updated
1980 NCAA Division II football season
Regular seasonAugust – November 1980
PlayoffsDecember 1980
National Championship Zia Bowl
University Stadium
Albuquerque, NM
Champion Cal Poly

The 1980 NCAA Division II football season, part of college football in the United States organized by the National Collegiate Athletic Association at the Division II level, began in August 1980, and concluded with the NCAA Division II Football Championship in December 1980 at University Stadium in Albuquerque, NM. During the game's two-year stretch in New Mexico, it was referred to as the Zia Bowl.

Contents

Cal Poly defeated Eastern Illinois in the championship game, 21–13, to win their first Division II national title. [1]

Conference changes and new programs

School1979 Conference1980 Conference
Delaware Independent I-AA Independent
Nicholls State Independent I-AA Independent
Northern Colorado - North Central
Sonoma State new program Independent
Southeastern Louisiana Independent I-AA Independent

Conference standings

1980 Association of Mid-Continent Universities football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Eastern Illinois $^400  1130
Northern Michigan ^310  920
Northern Iowa 220  740
Youngstown State 130  281
Western Illinois 040  460
  • $ Conference champion
  • ^ NCAA Division II playoff participant
1980 California Collegiate Athletic Association football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
No. 3 Cal Poly $^200  1030
Cal State Northridge 110  560
Cal Poly Pomona 020  370
  • $ Conference champion
  • ^ NCAA Division II playoff participant
Rankings from Associated Press poll
1980 Central Intercollegiate Athletic Association football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
North Carolina Central $700  750
No. 6 Virginia Union ^511  921
Elizabeth City State 520  721
Winston-Salem State 520  550
Saint Paul's (VA) 430  460
Norfolk State 331  541
Hampton 340  560
Johnson C. Smith 350  370
Fayetteville State 250  450
Virginia State 250  380
Bowie State 150  281
Livingstone 070  0100
  • $ Conference champion
  • ^ NCAA Division II playoff participant
Rankings from NCAA Division II AP Poll
1980 Far Western Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
UC Davis $500  721
Cal State Hayward 320  640
Chico State 320  550
San Francisco State 230  361
Sacramento State 140  370
Humboldt State 140  280
  • $ Conference champion
Rankings from Associated Press poll
1980 Great Lakes Intercollegiate Athletic Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Hillsdale $510  740
Northwood 420  621
Grand Valley State 420  730
Wayne State (MI) 330  540
Ferris State 231  442
Saginaw Valley State 240  560
Michigan Tech 051  261
  • $ Conference champion
1980 Heartland Collegiate Conference standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Franklin (IN) +520  820
Ashland +520  631
Saint Joseph's (IN) 430  640
Indiana Central 331  542
Georgetown (KY) 340  450
Butler 340  460
Evansville 340  370
Valparaiso 151  361
  • + Conference co-champions
1980 Lone Star Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Southwest Texas State $610  830
Angelo State ^511  821
Texas A&I 520  740
East Texas State ^421  831
Stephen F. Austin 430  460
Sam Houston State 250  370
Abilene Christian 160  280
Howard Payne 070  181
  • $ Conference champion
  • ^ – NAIA Division I playoff participant
1980 Missouri Intercollegiate Athletic Association football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Missouri-Rolla $600  1000
SW Missouri State 510  650
Central Missouri State 330  631
NE Missouri State 330  560
SE Missouri State 330  470
NW Missouri State 150  280
Lincoln (MO) 060  290
  • $ Conference champion
  • ^ NCAA Division II playoff participant
1980 North Central Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
No. 10 Northern Colorado $^610  740
Nebraska–Omaha 520  730
North Dakota 520  640
North Dakota State 520  640
South Dakota *331  560
Augustana (SD) 250  271
South Dakota State *151  380
Morningside 070  280
  • + Conference co-champions
  • ^ NCAA Division II playoff participant
  • * – South Dakota and South Dakota State split two head-to-head games, which counted as a tie for each team in the conference standings.
Rankings from AP Poll
1980 NCAA Division II independents football records
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Eastern Washington     640
Sonoma State     640
Towson State     550
Arkansas–Pine Bluff     560
Morgan State     470

Conference summaries

Conference Champions

Association of Mid-Continent Universities – Eastern Illinois
Central Intercollegiate Athletic Association – North Carolina Central
Far Western Football Conference – UC Davis
Great Lakes Intercollegiate Athletic Conference – Hillsdale
Gulf South Conference – North Alabama
Lone Star Conference – Southwest Texas State
Missouri Intercollegiate Athletic Association – Missouri–Rolla
North Central Conference – Northern Colorado
Northern Intercollegiate Conference – Minnesota–Duluth
Pennsylvania State Athletic Conference – Clarion
Rocky Mountain Athletic Conference – Adams State and CSU Pueblo
South Atlantic Conference – Elon and Mars Hill
Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Conference – Alabama A&M

Postseason

1980 NCAA Division II Football Championship
Teams8
Finals Site
Champion
Runner-up
Semifinalists
Winning Coach

The 1980 NCAA Division II Football Championship playoffs were the eighth single-elimination tournament to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division II college football. The championship game was held at University Stadium in Albuquerque, NM for the second, and final, time.

Playoff bracket

First round
Campus sites
Semifinals
Campus sites
Championship
University Stadium
Albuquerque, NM
         
Eastern Illinois 21
Northern Colorado 14
Eastern Illinois56
North Alabama 31
North Alabama 17
Virginia Union 8
Eastern Illinois 13
Cal Poly21
Santa Clara 27
Northern Michigan 26
Santa Clara 14
Cal Poly38
Cal Poly 15
Jacksonville State 0

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References

  1. "1980 NCAA Division II National Football Championship Bracket" (PDF). NCAA. NCAA.org. p. 13. Retrieved January 4, 2014.