1886 college football season

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The 1886 college football season had no clear-cut champion, with the Official NCAA Division I Football Records Book listing Princeton and Yale as having been selected national champions. [1]

Contents

Conference and program changes

School1885 Conference1886 Conference
California Golden Bears Program establishedIndependent

Season notes

On Thanksgiving Day in Princeton, NJ, undefeated teams from Yale and Princeton met. The game started late due to the absence of a referee, and heavy rain caused the game to be called on account of darkness with Yale leading 4–0 in the second half. Under the rules of the time, the game was declared "no contest" by the substitute referee, and the final score was declared to be 0–0. After a special meeting of the Intercollegiate Football Association held to review the game, the Association issued a two-part resolution - that (1) Yale should have been acknowledged the winner, but that (2) under their existing rules, the Association did not have the authority to award the game to them. [2]

The first intercollegiate game in the state of Vermont happened on November 6, 1886, between Dartmouth and Vermont at Burlington, Vermont. Dartmouth won 91 to 0. [3] Vermont was the last state in New England yet to have a football contest.

Conference standings

The following is a potentially incomplete list of conference standings:

1886 Northern Intercollegiate Football Association standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Williams $    411
Tufts     080
  • $ Conference champion

Independents

1886 Eastern college football independents records
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Yale     901
Princeton     701
Harvard     1220
Lafayette     1020
Williams     511
Massachusetts     210
Penn     971
Lehigh     431
Dartmouth     220
Amherst     340
Rutgers     130
Wesleyan     260
MIT     261
Vermont     010
Stevens     071
Tufts     080
Swarthmore       
Trinity (CT)       
1886 Midwestern college football independents records
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Cincinnati     200
Michigan     200
Wabash     201
Albion     120
Northwestern     010
Minnesota     020
1886 Southern college football independents records
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Navy     330
Johns Hopkins     221
Richmond     110
Randolph–Macon       
1886 Western college football independents records
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
California     621

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The 1885 college football season had no clear-cut champion, with the Official NCAA Division I Football Records Book listing Princeton as having been selected national champions. The season was notable for one of the most celebrated football plays of the 19th century - a 90-yard punt return by Henry "Tillie" Lamar of Princeton in the closing minutes of the game against Yale. Trailing 5–0, Princeton dropped two men back to receive a Yale punt. The punt glanced off one returner's shoulder and was caught by the other, Lamar, on the dead run. Lamar streaked down the left sideline, until hemmed in by two Princeton players, then cut sharply to the middle of the field, ducking under their arms and breaking loose for the touchdown. After the controversy of a darkness-shortened Yale-Princeton championship game the year before that was ruled "no contest," a record crowd turned out for the 1885 game. For the first time, the game was played on one of the campuses instead of at a neutral site, and emerged as a major social event, attracting ladies to its audience as well as students and male spectators. The Lamar punt return furnished the most spectacular ending to any football game played to that point, and did much to popularize the sport of college football to the general public.

1879 Navy Midshipmen football team American college football season

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The 1886 Princeton Tigers football team represented Princeton University in the 1886 college football season. The team finished with a 7–0–1 record and was retroactively named as the national champion by the Billingsley Report and as a co-national champion by Parke H. Davis. They outscored their opponents 320 to 27.

1886 Yale Bulldogs football team American college football season

The 1886 Yale Bulldogs football team represented Yale University in the 1886 college football season. The team finished with a 9–0–1 record and was retroactively named as the national champion by the Helms Athletic Foundation and National Championship Foundation and a co-national champion by Parke H. Davis.

References

  1. Official 2009 NCAA Division I Football Records Book (PDF). Indianapolis, IN: The National Collegiate Athletic Association. August 2009. p. 70. Retrieved October 16, 2009.
  2. "No Football Champions.; But Princeton Challenges Yale To Another Game On Saturday". The New York Times. November 28, 1886.
  3. "College Football Games". New York Times. November 7, 1886. p. 3. Retrieved March 27, 2015 via Newspapers.com. Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg