1985 NCAA Division II football season

Last updated
1985 NCAA Division II football season
Regular seasonAugust – November 1985
PlayoffsDecember 1985
National Championship Palm Bowl
Veterans Stadium
McAllen, TX
Champion North Dakota State (2)

The 1985 NCAA Division II football season, part of college football in the United States organized by the National Collegiate Athletic Association at the Division II level, began in August 1985, and concluded with the NCAA Division II Football Championship on December 14, 1985, at McAllen Veterans Memorial Stadium in McAllen, Texas. During the game's five-year stretch in McAllen, the "City of Palms", it was referred to as the Palm Bowl. The North Dakota State Bison defeated the North Alabama Lions, 35–7, to win their second Division II national title. [1]

Contents

Conference changes and new programs

School1984 Conference1985 Conference
Cal Lutheran - Western
Sacramento State NCAC Western
West Texas State Missouri Valley (I–A) Lone Star

Conference standings

1985 Great Lakes Intercollegiate Athletic Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Hillsdale $^510  1111
Saginaw Valley State 411  451
Ferris State 420  640
Grand Valley State 420  065
Northwood 231  342
Wayne State (MI) 150  181
Michigan Tech 060  190
  • $ Conference champion
  • ^ – NAIA Division I playoff participant
1985 Heartland Collegiate Conference standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Butler +510  820
Ashland +510  640
Indiana Central 411  712
Franklin (IN) 241  541
Valparaiso 240  640
Saint Joseph's (IN) 250  370
Evansville 150  280
  • + Conference co-champions
1985 Lone Star Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Texas A&I $500  830
Angelo State 320  740
Eastern New Mexico 320  550
Abilene Christian 230  542
East Texas State 230  550
Howard Payne 050  262
  • $ Conference champion
1985 Missouri Intercollegiate Athletic Association football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
No. 11 NE Missouri State $500  830
Missouri–Rolla 410  730
NW Missouri State 230  461
SE Missouri State 230  470
Central Missouri State 230  370
Lincoln (MO) 050  1100
  • $ Conference champion
Rankings from NCAA Division II Football Committee poll
1985 North Central Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
No. 7 North Dakota State $^711  1121
No. 4 South Dakota ^720  1030
South Dakota State 720  740
Morningside 531  731
St. Cloud State 540  650
Mankato State 450  560
Nebraska–Omaha 450  650
Northern Colorado 270  290
North Dakota 270  380
Augustana (SD) 180  190
  • $ Conference champion
  • ^ NCAA Division II playoff participant
Rankings from NCAA Division II Football Committee poll
1985 Northern California Athletic Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
No. 1 UC Davis $^500  920
Chico State 311  441
Cal State Hayward 221  631
San Francisco State 230  361
Sonoma State 140  370
Humboldt State 140  280
  • $ Conference champion
  • ^ NCAA Division II playoff participant
Rankings from Division II Football Committee poll
1985 Western Football Conference standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
No. 15 Santa Clara $401  821
No. 19 Sacramento State 410  830
Portland State 221  451
Cal Poly 230  470
Cal Lutheran 140  650
Cal State Northridge 140  470
  • $ Conference champion
Rankings from Division II Football Committee poll
1985 NCAA Division II independents football records
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
No. 10 Towson State     721
No. 5 Central State (OH) ^    830
Northern Michigan     630
New Haven     640
Liberty     341
UCF     470
  • ^ NCAA Division II playoff participant
Rankings from NCAA Division II Football Committee poll

Conference summaries

Conference Champions

Central Intercollegiate Athletic Association – Hampton
Great Lakes Intercollegiate Athletic Conference – Hillsdale
Gulf South Conference – North Alabama
Lone Star Conference – Texas A&I
Missouri Intercollegiate Athletic Association – Northeast Missouri State
North Central Conference – North Dakota State
Northern California Athletic Conference – UC Davis
Northern Intercollegiate Conference – Minnesota–Duluth
Pennsylvania State Athletic Conference – Bloomsburg
Rocky Mountain Athletic Conference – Colorado Mesa
South Atlantic Conference – Mars Hill
Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Conference – Albany State and Fort Valley State

Postseason

1985 NCAA Division II Football Championship
Teams8
Finals Site
Champion
Runner-up
Semifinalists
Winning Coach

The 1985 NCAA Division II Football Championship playoffs were the 13th single-elimination tournament to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division II college football. The championship game was held at McAllen Veterans Memorial Stadium in McAllen, Texas, for the fifth, and final, time.

Playoff bracket

First round
Campus sites
Semifinals
Campus sites
Championship
McAllen Veterans Memorial Stadium
McAllen, TX
         
North Dakota State 31
UC Davis 12
North Dakota State16
South Dakota 7
South Dakota 13**
Central State (OH) 10
North Dakota State35
North Alabama 7
Bloomsburg 38
Hampton 28
Bloomsburg 0
North Alabama34
North Alabama 14
Fort Valley State 7

See also

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References

  1. "1985 NCAA Division II National Football Championship Bracket" (PDF). NCAA. NCAA.org. p. 13. Retrieved January 4, 2014.