2009 NCAA Division I FCS football season

Last updated
2009 NCAA Division I FCS season
NCAA logo.svg
Regular season
DurationAugust – November
Payton Award Armanti Edwards [1]
Buchanan Award Arthur Moats [2]
Playoff
DurationNovember 28 – December 18
Championship date December 18, 2009
Championship site Finley Stadium
Chattanooga, Tennessee
Champion Villanova
NCAA Division I FCS football seasons
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The 2009 NCAA Division I FCS football season, the 2009 season of college football for teams in the Football Championship Subdivision (FCS), began in August 2009 and concluded with the 2009 NCAA Division I Football Championship Game on December 18, 2009, in Chattanooga, Tennessee, won by Villanova 23–21 over Montana. [3]

Contents

Rule changes for 2009

The NCAA football rules committee proposed several rule changes for 2009. [4] Before these rules were officially adopted, the proposals had to be approved by the Playing Rules Oversight Panel. The rule changes include the following:

FCS team wins over FBS teams

In the 2009 season, FCS teams played a total of 91 games against FBS opponents. Notably, four of the five victorious FCS teams—all except Central Arkansas—were members of the Colonial Athletic Association. All four made that season's playoffs and advanced to the quarterfinals. Richmond lost in that round to Appalachian State, while Villanova defeated both New Hampshire (quarterfinals) and William & Mary (semifinals) on its way to the national title.

Notable upsets

Conference and program changes

Dropped programs

After Northeastern's final game of the season, a 33–27 win over Rhode Island on November 21, the school announced that it was dropping the football program. [5] The Huskies ended their 74th season with a 3–8 record, but school officials cited that losing seasons were not the determining factor. [5]

On December 3, Hofstra also announced that it was dropping their football program in favor of academic funding. [6] The football team, which finished the season 5–6 after a 52–38 win over Massachusetts, ended their program after 73 years.

The Colonial Athletic Association, where both teams played, decided to replace the two teams with new programs at Old Dominion and Georgia State in 2011 and 2012, respectively. Old Dominion started its program during the 2009 season; Georgia State started theirs in 2010.

Conference changes

School2008 Conference2009 Conference
Bryant FCS Independent Northeast
Iona FCS Independent Dropped Program
Marist FCS Independent Pioneer
Old Dominion New Program FCS Independent
Western Kentucky FCS Independent Sun Belt (FBS)

Eastern Illinois coach's death

On Saturday, November 28, just hours after Eastern Illinois lost to Southern Illinois 48–7 in the first round of the FCS playoffs, Eastern Illinois' offensive coordinator Jeffrey O. Hoover, age 41, was killed in a car accident. [7] The single-vehicle accident occurred south of Effingham when Hoover, his family and EIU strength coach Eric Cash struck a deer while driving home from Carbondale, the home of SIU. [8]

Hoover's death was the second Eastern Illinois coaching death within a month. On November 4, women's basketball assistant coach Jackie Moore, 28, died after collapsing during a workout on campus. [7]

Conference standings

2009 Big Sky Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
Team W L    W L 
No. 2 Montana $^ 80    141 
No. 13 Eastern Washington ^ 62    84 
No. 17 Weber State ^ 62    75 
Montana State  53    74 
Northern Arizona  44    56 
Sacramento State  44    56 
Northern Colorado  17    38 
Portland State  17    29 
Idaho State  17    110 
  • $ Conference champion
  • ^ FCS playoff participant
Rankings from The Sports Network poll
2009 Big South Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
Team W L    W L 
No. 22 Liberty + 51    83 
Stony Brook + 51    65 
Charleston Southern  42    65 
Gardner–Webb  33    65 
Coastal Carolina  33    56 
VMI  15    29 
Presbyterian  06    011 
  • + Conference co-champions
Rankings from The Sports Network poll
2009 Colonial Athletic Association football standings
Conf  Overall
Team W L    W L 
North
No. 7 New Hampshire x^ 62    103 
Maine  44    56 
Hofstra  35    56 
UMass  35    56 
Northeastern  35    38 
Rhode Island  08    110 
South
No. 1 Villanova x+^ 71    141 
No. 5 Richmond x+^ 71    112 
No. 4 William & Mary ^ 62    113 
Delaware  44    65 
James Madison  44    65 
Towson  17    29 
  • + Conference co-champions
  • x Division champion/co-champions
  • ^ FCS playoff participant
Rankings from The Sports Network poll
2009 Great West Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
Team W L    W L 
UC Davis $ 31    65 
North Dakota  22    65 
South Dakota  22    55 
Southern Utah  22    56 
Cal Poly  13    47 
  • $ Conference champion
Rankings from AP Poll
2009 Ivy League football standings
Conf  Overall
Team W L    W L 
No. 20 Penn $ 70    82 
Harvard  61    73 
Brown  43    64 
Columbia  34    46 
Princeton  34    46 
Yale  25    46 
Dartmouth  25    28 
Cornell  16    28 
  • $ Conference champion
Rankings from The Sports Network poll
2009 Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
Team W L    W L 
No. 8 South Carolina State $^ 71    102 
No. 23 Florida A&M  62    83 
Norfolk State  53    74 
Morgan State  44    65 
Bethune-Cookman  44    56 
Delaware State  44    47 
Hampton  35    56 
North Carolina A&T  25    46 
Howard  08    29 
  • $ Conference champion
  • ^ FCS playoff participant
Rankings from The Sports Network poll
2009 Missouri Valley Football Conference standings
Conf  Overall
Team W L    W L 
No. 6 Southern Illinois $^ 80    112 
No. 11 South Dakota State ^ 71    83 
No. 18 Northern Iowa  53    74 
Illinois State  53    65 
Missouri State  44    65 
Youngstown State  44    65 
North Dakota State  26    38 
Indiana State  17    110 
Western Illinois  08    110 
  • $ Conference champion
  • ^ FCS playoff participant
Rankings from The Sports Network poll
2009 Northeast Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
Team W L    W L 
Central Connecticut State $ 71    93 
Albany  62    74 
Wagner  53    65 
Robert Morris  53    56 
Monmouth  44    56 
Bryant  44    56 
Duquesne  26    38 
Sacred Heart  26    28 
Saint Francis (PA)  17    29 
  • $ Conference champion
2009 Ohio Valley Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
Team W L    W L 
No. 16 Jacksonville State  61    83 
No. 19 Eastern Illinois $^ 62    84 
Tennessee Tech  53    65 
Eastern Kentucky  53    56 
UT Martin  44    56 
Tennessee State  34    47 
Austin Peay  35    47 
Murray State  26    38 
Southeast Missouri State  17    29 
  • $ Conference champion
  • ^ FCS playoff participant
  • Jacksonville State had the best record in conference play, but was not eligible for the FCS playoffs because of APR violations.
Rankings from The Sports Network poll
2009 Patriot League football standings
Conf  Overall
Team W L    W L 
No. 14 Holy Cross $^ 51    93 
No. 21 Colgate  42    92 
No. 24 Lafayette  42    83 
Lehigh  42    47 
Fordham  24    56 
Bucknell  24    47 
Georgetown  06    011 
  • $ Conference champion
  • ^ FCS playoff participant
Rankings from The Sports Network poll
2009 Pioneer Football League standings
Conf  Overall
Team W L    W L 
Butler + 71    111 
Dayton + 71    92 
Drake  62    83 
Jacksonville  62    74 
Marist  53    74 
San Diego  35    47 
Davidson  35    37 
Campbell  26    38 
Morehead State  17    38 
Valparaiso  08    110 
  • + Conference co-champions
2009 Southern Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
Team W L    W L 
No. 3 Appalachian State $^ 80    113 
No. 9 Elon ^ 71    93 
Furman  53    65 
Chattanooga  44    65 
Georgia Southern  44    56 
Samford  35    56 
Wofford  26    38 
The Citadel  26    47 
Western Carolina  17    29 
  • $ Conference champion
  • ^ FCS playoff participant
Rankings from The Sports Network poll
2009 Southland Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
Team W L    W L 
No. 10 Stephen F. Austin +^ 61    103 
No. 12 McNeese State +^ 61    92 
No. 25 Texas State  52    74 
Southeastern Louisiana  43    65 
Sam Houston State  34    56 
Central Arkansas  25    56 
Nicholls State  25    39 
Northwestern State  07    011 
  • + Conference co-champions
  • ^ FCS playoff participant
Rankings from The Sports Network FCS Poll
2009 Southwestern Athletic Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
Team W L    W L 
East
Alabama A&M x 43    75 
Alcorn State  34    36 
Jackson State  35    37 
Alabama State  16    47 
Mississippi Valley State  17    38 
West
No. 15 Prairie View A&M x$ 70    91 
Grambling State  53    75 
Texas Southern  52    65 
Arkansas–Pine Bluff  44    65 
Southern  35    66 
Championship: Prairie View A&M 30, Alabama A&M 24
December 12, 2009
  • $ Conference champion
  • x Division champion/co-champions
Rankings from The Sports Network FCS Poll
2009 NCAA Division I FCS independents football standings
Conf  Overall
Team W L    W L 
Old Dominion      92 
North Carolina Central      47 
Savannah State      28 
Winston–Salem State      110 

Conference champions

Automatic berths

Invitation

In order to be eligible for the playoffs, these teams must have a minimum of eight Division I wins, with at least two against teams in automatic bid conferences. They also must be ranked an average of 16 or better in the national rankings, made up of the following components:

No team in the invitational conferences qualified. Starting in 2010, the Big South and NEC will become automatic bid conferences with the expansion of the playoff field to 20 teams.

Abstains

(Overall Record, Conference Record)

Postseason

NCAA FCS Playoff bracket

First Round
November 28
Campus Sites
Quarterfinals
December 5
Campus Sites
Semifinals
December 11 and December 12
Campus Sites
National Championship Game

December 18
Finley Stadium
Chattanooga, Tennessee

            
South Dakota State (8–3) 48
1 Montana* (11–0) 61
1Montana*51
Stephen F. Austin 0
Eastern Washington (8–3) 33
Stephen F. Austin* (9–2) 44
1Montana*24
Appalachian State 17
Elon (9–2) 13
4 Richmond* (10–1) 16
4 Richmond* 31
Appalachian State35
South Carolina State (10–1) 13
Appalachian State* (9–2) 20
1 Montana 21
2Villanova23
Holy Cross (9–2) 28
2 Villanova* (10–1) 38
2Villanova*46
New Hampshire 7
New Hampshire (9–2) 49
McNeese State* (9–2) 13
2Villanova*14
William & Mary 13
Eastern Illinois (8–3) 7
3 Southern Illinois* (10–1) 48
3 Southern Illinois* 3
William & Mary24
Weber State (7–4) 0
William & Mary* (9–2) 38

*Host institution

SWAC Championship Game

DateLocationVenueWest Div. ChampionEast Div. ChampionResult
December 12 Birmingham, Alabama Legion Field Prairie View A&M Alabama A&M Prairie View A&M 30–24

Gridiron Classic

The Gridiron Classic is an annual game between the champions of the Northeast Conference and the Pioneer Football League that has been held since December 2006.

DateLocationVenueNEC ChampionPFL ChampionResult
December 5 Indianapolis Butler Bowl Central Connecticut State Butler Butler 28–23

Final poll standings

Related Research Articles

Pioneer Football League Football-only athletic conference

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NCAA Division I Football Championship

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Colonial Athletic Association

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NCAA Division I Highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association

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2007 NCAA Division I FCS football season

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Villanova Wildcats football

The Villanova Wildcats football program represents Villanova University in the NCAA Division I Football Championship Subdivision.

2008 NCAA Division I FCS football season

The 2008 NCAA Division I FCS football season, the 2008 season of college football for teams in the Football Championship Subdivision (FCS), began on August 28, 2008, and concluded on December 19, 2008, in Chattanooga, Tennessee, at the 2008 NCAA Division I Football Championship Game, where the Richmond Spiders defeated the Montana Grizzlies to win the NCAA Division I Football Championship.

Stony Brook Seawolves football

The Stony Brook Seawolves football program is the collegiate football team that represents Stony Brook University at the NCAA Division I level. The program participates in the Division I Football Championship Subdivision and currently competes in the eleven-member Colonial Athletic Association. The program plays its home games at Kenneth P. LaValle Stadium in Stony Brook, New York.

2010 NCAA Division I FCS football season

The 2010 NCAA Division I FCS football season, the 2010 season of college football for teams in the Football Championship Subdivision (FCS), began in September 2010 and concluded with the 2011 NCAA Division I Football Championship Game on January 7, 2011. In the title game, Eastern Washington defeated Delaware, 20–19, to claim their first Division I national title in any team sport.

2012 NCAA Division I FCS football season

The 2012 NCAA Division I FCS football season, part of college football in the United States, was organized by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) at the Division I Football Championship Subdivision (FCS) level. The season began on August 30, 2012, and concluded with the 2013 NCAA Division I Football Championship Game on January 5, 2013, at FC Dallas Stadium in Frisco, Texas.

2013 NCAA Division I FCS football season

The 2013 NCAA Division I FCS football season, part of college football in the United States, was organized by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) at the Division I Football Championship Subdivision (FCS) level. The season began on August 29, 2013, and concluded with the 2014 NCAA Division I Football Championship Game on January 4, 2014, at Toyota Stadium in Frisco, Texas.

2014 NCAA Division I FCS football season

The 2014 NCAA Division I FCS football season, part of college football in the United States, was organized by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) at the Division I Football Championship Subdivision (FCS) level. The season began on August 23, 2014, and concluded with the 2015 NCAA Division I Football Championship Game played on January 10, 2015, at Toyota Stadium in Frisco, Texas.

2016 NCAA Division I FCS football season

The 2016 NCAA Division I FCS football season, part of college football in the United States, was organized by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) at the Division I Football Championship Subdivision (FCS) level. The FCS Championship Game was played on January 7, 2017, in Frisco, Texas. The James Madison Dukes defeated the Youngstown State Penguins, 28–14, to capture their second National Championship in team history.

2017 NCAA Division I FCS football season

The 2017 NCAA Division I FCS football season, part of college football in the United States, was organized by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) at the Division I Football Championship Subdivision (FCS) level. The FCS Championship Game was played on January 6, 2018, in Frisco, Texas. The North Dakota State Bison beat the James Madison Dukes, 17–13, to capture their sixth title in seven years.

2018 NCAA Division I FCS football season

The 2018 NCAA Division I FCS football season, part of college football in the United States, was organized by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) at the Division I Football Championship Subdivision (FCS) level. The FCS Championship Game was played on January 5, 2019, in Frisco, Texas. North Dakota State claimed its second consecutive FCS title, and seventh in eight years.

2019 NCAA Division I FCS football season American college football season

The 2019 NCAA Division I FCS football season, part of college football in the United States, was organized by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) at the Division I Football Championship Subdivision (FCS) level. The FCS Championship Game was played on January 11, 2020, in Frisco, Texas. North Dakota State entered the season as the defending champion, and after completing the regular season undefeated, successfully defended their title and secured their eighth championship in nine seasons.

2020–21 NCAA Division I FCS football season American college football season

The 2020–21 NCAA Division I FCS football season, part of college football in the United States, is organized by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) at the Division I Football Championship Subdivision (FCS) level.

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