Indiana State Sycamores football

Last updated
Indiana State Sycamores football
AmericanFootball current event.svg 2021 Indiana State Sycamores football team
Indiana State Sycamores logo.svg
First season1896
Athletic director Sherard Clinkscales
Head coach Curt Mallory
2nd season, 7–15 (.318)
Stadium Memorial Stadium
(capacity: 12,764)
Year built1924
Field surfaceField Turf
Location Terre Haute, Indiana
NCAA division Division I FCS
Conference Missouri Valley Football Conference
All-time record39152323 (.430)
Bowl record01 (.000)
Playoff appearances3 (Div. I FCS)
1983, 1984, 2014
Playoff record2–3 (Div. I FCS)
Conference titles1
1964 Indiana Collegiate
Rivalries Ball State (rivalry)
Consensus All-Americans16
ColorsRoyal blue and white [1]
         
Fight songMarch On!
MascotSycamore Sam
Marching bandMarching Sycamores
Outfitter Under Armor
Website GoSycamores.com
For information on all Indiana State University sports, see Indiana State Sycamores

The Indiana State Sycamores football team is the NCAA Division I football program of Indiana State University in Terre Haute, Indiana. They compete in the Missouri Valley Football Conference. The team last played in the NCAA Playoffs in the 2014 NCAA Division I Football Championship. Their first season was 1896. The Sycamore's greatest season was 1983, when coach Dennis Raetz led them to the 2nd round of the 1983 NCAA Division I Football Championship versus the Southern Illinois Salukis and ended the season with a record of 9–4. The Sycamores also appeared in 1984 NCAA Division I Football Championship playoffs. The Indiana State Sycamores play their home games at Memorial Stadium, which seats 12,764.

Contents

History

Classifications

Conference memberships

Conference championships

The 1964 Indiana State Sycamores football team shared the Indiana Collegiate Conference (ICC) title in 1964 with four other teams (Ball State, Butler, Evansville, Valparaiso, with the Sycamores finishing with a 4–2 conference record and a 6–2 overall mark. [2]

Bowls and playoffs

Bowl games

The Sycamores have participated in one bowl game, garnering a record of 0–1.

YearBowlOpponentResult
1949 Shrine Bowl Southern Illinois L 14–41

Division I NCAA Playoffs

The Sycamores have appeared in 3 NCAA Division I Football Championships. Their combined record is 2–3.

Date playedRoundWinnerRunner-Up
1983 NCAA Division I First Round Indiana State16 Eastern Illinois 13
1983 Pecan Bowl Southern Illinois 23Indiana State7
1984 Pecan Bowl Middle Tennessee State 42Indiana State41
2014 NCAA Division I First Round Indiana State36 Eastern Kentucky 16
2014 NCAA Division I Second Round Chattanooga 35Indiana State14

Rankings

The Sycamores reached the AP and United Press International Top Ten mid-way through the 1974 season; they would not return to the Top Ten until the 1983 season. The 2018 Sycamores finished # 22 in the final Coaches poll & # 25 in the final STATS poll.

Head coaches

All Indiana State Coaching Records are available at: [3]

Coach (Alma Mater)SeasonsTenureGamesRecordPct.
Dennis Raetz (Nebraska, 1968)181980–199720094–105–1.473
Wally Marks (Chicago, 1927)161927–1930, 1933–1941, 1946–194812562–56–7.524
Jerry Huntsman (Wabash, 1952)71966–19726843–24–1.640
Bill Jones (Ohio Wesleyan, 1939)91957–19657032–37–1.464
Tim McGuire (Nebraska, 1975)71998–20047924–55.304
Art Strum (Wisconsin-LaCrosse, 1916)61923–1926, 1932, 19424321–20–2.512
Tom Harp (Muskingum, 1951)51973–19775120–31.392
Trent Miles (Indiana State, 1987)52008–20125620–36.357
Mike Sanford (Southern California, 1976)42013–20164818–30.375
Mark Dean (Northern Illinois, 1938)51951–1954, 19563915–20–4.436
Curt Mallory (Michigan, 1990)42017–present3412–22.353
Dick Jamieson (Bradley, 1961)21978–19792211–11.500
Phil Brown (Butler, 1923)1194485–2–1.688
J. Roy Goodlad (Wisconsin, 1929)1193174–3.571
CPO Bob LeCray [lower-alpha 1] (SE Okla St, 19--)1194562–4.333
Paul Selge (Indiana State, 1943)1195592–7.222
George Ashworth (Indiana State, 1935)21949–1950192–16–1.132
Lou West (Cincinnati, 1976)32005–2007331–32.030
various (7 others)131896–1909, 1920, 1943429–28–5.274
  1. Chief Petty Officer (CPO) LeCroy was member of US Navy's V-12 program staff during World War II

Rivalries

Ball State

From 1924 to 2014, the Sycamores played Ball State (Ind.) University 65 times; the series stands at 38–24–1 in favor of Ball State.

In 1940, the respective Blue Key chapters sponsored a trophy presentation, the 'Victory Bell' to reward the winner of the annual game between Indiana State and Ball State. The Sycamores hold the Victory Bell, having won the last match 27–20 on the road in 2014.

Traditions

Homecoming

The term Homecoming was first used in print announcements for the Alumni-Varsity Basketball Game on Dec. 9, 1916. By the year 1919, this event became known as Blue and White Day and featured dances and entertainment for alumni of the Normal School. In 1921 the events were organized around a football game scheduled earlier in the autumn. A bonfire and pep rally were added to the festivities in 1922; the Blue-and-White Parade in 1923; and in 1937, Bette Whitmore (Kappa Kappa) was elected ISUs first Homecoming Queen. [4] The 2010 season will mark the 106th season of Sycamore football and the 91st Homecoming; the Sycamores will face conference foe, Illinois State, on October 9. This will mark the 7th time that Illinois State has been the Homecoming opponent; following a tremoundous victory (59–24) the Sycamores now own a 5–2 mark vs. Illinois State in Homecoming games.

As of 2012; Indiana State owns a 50–36–2 (.580) record in Homecoming games; the outcomes of the remaining 5 games are unknown.

Victory Bell

A symbol of the traditional rivalry in football between Indiana State and Ball State, the Victory Bell tradition was inaugurated in 1940 when the Blue Key chapters at both schools arranged to donate a bell to be presented to the victor of the football game. The idea was to start a traditional exchange of the bell as a means of improving relationships between the two student bodies. [5] The Victory Bell series is 34–19–1 in favor of Ball State, though the Sycamores won their last meeting in 2014.

Stadiums

YearHome
1896–1948Multiple Venues; including Thompson Park, aka, Parsons Field.
1949–present Memorial Stadium, constructed in 1924.

The Sycamores have played football at venerable Memorial Stadium since the 1949 campaign. Originally constructed in 1922–24, at a cost of $450,000; the 12,764-seat stadium remains a fixture at the intersection of Wabash and Brown Avenues in Terre Haute, IN.

Memorial Stadium's inauguration was on May 5, 1925, as the local minor league baseball team, the Terre Haute Tots, hosted their Three-I League rivals, the Peoria Tractors, before an estimated crowd of 9,000. Among the esteemed visitors were Major League Baseball Commissioner Judge Kennesaw Mountain Landis and Charles Barnard of the Cleveland Indians.

The facility was acquired (via a 99-year lease) by Indiana State University in 1967. The installation of Astroturf made Indiana State the first university to own a football stadium with artificial turf.

Player of the year

National

Conference

All-Americans 1st Team

Academic All-American

NCAA Post-Graduate Scholarship

All-Conference

All-Indiana Collegiate Conference

[12] [13] [14]

  • Bob Masulovich, OL, 1952
  • Jack Griffith, OL, 1953
  • Bob Masulovich, OL, 1953
  • Jack Griffith, End, 1954
  • Bob Masulovich, OL, 1954
  • Bill Griffith, End, 1955
  • Wally Geib, OL, 1962
  • Joe Beach, DL, 1962
  • Wally Geib, OL, 1963
  • John Allen, OL, 1964
  • Rolland Beckham, OL, 1964
  • Arthur Fallon, OT, 1964
  • Willie Smith, End, 1964
  • Emmitt "Tank" Tyler, FB, 1964
  • Edgar Freese, OL, 1965
  • Bernard Heins, OL, 1965
  • John Newbitt, HB, 1965
  • Bob Pychinka, LB, 1965
  • John Truitt, End, 1965
  • John Truitt, End, 1966
  • Joe Fiedler, C, 1966
  • Randy Payne, HB, 1966
  • Bob Pychinka, LB, 1966
  • Timon Kendall, OL, 1967
  • Rich Attonito, DB, 1967
  • Stan Worrall, DL, 1967

All-Missouri Valley Conference

  • Vincent Allen, RB, 1977
  • Don Jackson, DB, 1977
  • Gary Gamen, DT, 1978
  • John Allman, DB, 1978
  • Kirk Wilson, WR, 1979
  • Eddie Ruffin, WR, 1979
  • George DeTella, OT, 1979
  • Reggie Allen, QB, 1979
  • Gerry Gluscic, DE, 1979
  • John Allman, DB, 1979
  • Hubert Moore, TE, 1980
  • Eddie Ruffin, WR, 1980
  • Mark Gradkowski, OG, 1980
  • John Gaunt, DT, 1980
  • Craig Shaffer, LB, 1980
  • John Allman, DB, 1980
  • Hubert Moore, TE 1981
  • Kirk Wilson, WR, 1981
  • Craig Shaffer, LB, 1981
  • Walter Seaphus, NG, 1982
  • Ed Martin, DE, 1982
  • Dan Maher, LB, 1982
  • Bob Koehne, OT, 1983
  • Rich Dawson, C, 1983
  • Jeff Miller, QB, 1983
  • Ed Martin, DE, 1983
  • Quintin Mikell, LB, 1983
  • Kevin Ramsey, DB, 1983
  • Wayne Davis, DB, 1984
  • Steve Buxton, OG, 1984
  • Rich Dawson, C, 1984
  • Jeff Miller, QB, 1984
  • Darrold Clardy, RB, 1984
  • Scott Bridges, PK, 1984
  • Doug Arnold, NG, 1984
  • Brad Verdun, DT, 1984
  • Jeff Miller, QB, 1985
  • Doug Arnold, NG, 1985
  • Terry Bell, WR, 1985
  • Vencie Glenn, DB, 1985
  • Mike Simmonds, OG, 1985
  • Kurt Bell, DE, 1985

All-Missouri Valley Football Conference

  • Mike Simmonds, OT, 1986
  • Steve McKeel, DB, 1986
  • Troy Johnson, LB, 1986
  • Tim Cunningham, LB, 1986
  • Chuck Standiford, P, 1986
  • Pete Endre, OT, 1987
  • Steve McKeel, DB, 1987
  • Gary Cannon, WR, 1987
  • Steve Elmlinger, WR, 1988
  • Tori Vactor, RB, 1988
  • Ken Hopp, LB, 1988
  • Troy Mickens, DB, 1988
  • Rodney Porter, TE, 1989
  • Mark Bertram, DT, 1989
  • Derrick Franklin, RB, 1990
  • Charles Swann, WR, 1990
  • Eric Christensen, LB, 1991
  • Derrick Franklin, RB, 1991
  • Charles Swann, WR, 1991
  • Dyrrah Christon, NG, 1992
  • David Wright, RB, 1992
  • Dan Brandenburg, DT, 1993
  • Von Ganaway, FS, 1993
  • Tim Giebels, OT, 1993
  • Shawn Moore, OG, 1993
  • David Wright, RB, 1993
  • Dan Brandenburg, DT, 1994
  • Dustin Rusch, DT, 1994
  • Dan Brandenburg, DT, 1995
  • Dre Knox, DB, 1996
  • Richard Moss, LB, 1996
  • Robert High, FS, 1997
  • Shannon Jackson, DT, 1997
  • DeJuan Alfonzo, DB, 1998
  • Troy Lefevra, DE, 1998
  • DeJuan Alfonzo, DB, 1999
  • Nathan Al-Ghetta, FB, 1999
  • Shannon Jackson, DE, 1999
  • Troy Lefevra, DE, 1999
  • Richard Harris, DE, 2001
  • Richard Harris, DE, 2002
  • Dietrich Lapsley, LB, 2002
  • Soso Dede, KR, 2002
  • Ryan King, TE, 2003
  • Kyle Mitchell, DE, 2003
  • Kyle Mitchell, DE, 2004
  • Sam Logan, WR, 2005
  • Kyle Mitchell, DE, 2005
  • Jamie Petrowski, TE, 2005
  • Shonda Faulkner, LB, 2007
  • Darrius Gates, RB, 2010
  • Brock Lough, FB, 2010
  • Ben Obaseki, DE, 2010
  • Alex Sewall, DB, 2010
  • Aaron Archie, LB, 2011
  • Shakir Bell, RB, 2011
  • Alex Jones, TE, 2011
  • Brock Lough, FB, 2011
  • FN Lutz, OL, 2011
  • Ben Obaseki, DE, 2011
  • Alex Sewall, DB, 2011
  • Shakir Bell, RB, 2012
  • Aaron Archie, LB, 2012
  • Ben Obaseski, DE, 2012
  • Johnny Towalid, DB, 2012
  • Lucas Hileman, P, 2012
  • Connor Underwood, DL, 2013
  • Connor Underwood, DL, 2014
  • Josh Appel, LS, 2015
  • Josh Appel, LS, 2016
  • Ja'Quan Keys, RB, 2018
  • Jonas Griffith, LB, 2018

Career leaders

Passing

PlayerYearsCompAttTDYdsPct.Int
Mike Perish2012–2014618 1,050456,696 .59028
Jeff Miller1982–19855551,016406,448.55233
John Sahm1986–1989341668305,139.49638
Reggie Allen1978–1981367782295,094.46946
Ronnie Fouch 2010–2011322544384,316.59215
Kip Hennelly1991–1993249490193,158.50827
Julian Reese2001–2002267499202,961.53521
Kevin Cox1993–1996238528202,885.4522
Kyle Frondorf1986–198820839182,778.53224
Blayne Baggett2005284473152,741.60013

Rushing

PlayerYearsAttYdsAvg.TD
Vincent Allen1973–1977 832 4,335 5.2131
Shakir Bell2010–20136724,2146.328
David Wright1992–19957844,1815.3322
Derrick Franklin1989–19917103,2314.5523
Eric Robinson1979–19824432,1694.9022
Jake Shields2001–20045212,1194.0719
Darrius Gates2006–20103962,0105.0820
Jim Brumfield1967–19694481,9984.4623
Darrold Clardy1981–19843551,5944.4919
Tori Vactor1987–19883121,5454.9512

Receiving

PlayerYearsRcptYdsAvg.TD
Sam Logan2003–2006 196 2,385 12.29
Robert Tonyan 2013–20161472,02913.820
Carl Berman2003–20061361,66612.111
Rodney Porter1986–19891351,90614.19
Terry Bell1982–19851322,04815.513
Joe Downing1982–19851151,60814.015
Eddie Ruffin1978–19811101,83116.611
Gary Owens2013–20151051,37313.113
Larry Brown1993–19961051,19711.46
Steve Elminger1987–19891021,82317.910
Steve Schmid1967–19691001,39413.911

Scoring

PlayerYearsTDFGPAT1PAT2PTS
Kyle Hooper2003–2007042850221
Vincent Allen1973–197733001200
Tom Allison1992–1995038820196
Scott Bridges1983–1985031870180
Shakir Bell2010–201330000180
Eric Heidorn2013-2015029810168
Mike Megyesi1999–2002027830164
Jim Brumfield1967–196926000156
Robert Tonyan2013–201622004140
David Wright1992–199523001140

Career leaders in bold

Coach of the Year

District / Region (5)

Conference (8)

Notable alumni

Sycamores in Professional Leagues

Fifty former Sycamores have played in professional football leagues. The leagues include the NFL, CFL, AFL. and the UFL.
The most notable players are:

PlayerClass YearPositionPrimary Team(s)CareerHighlight(s)
Dominique Dafney 2020 TE Green Bay Packers 2020–present
Robert Tonyan 2017 TE Green Bay Packers 2017–present
Jameer Thurman 2016 LB Calgary Stampeders2017–present2018 Grey Cup Champion
Shakir Bell 2012 RB Ottawa Redblacks2014–20172015 Grey Cup Champion, All-American
Jamie Petrowski 2006 TE Tennessee Titans2006–20123rd Team All-American
Dan Brandenburg1996 DT Buffalo Bills1996–199942 Career Games
John Bock1993 OL Miami Dolphins1995–200017 Career Starts; Head Coach, Brooklyn Bolts
Vencie Glenn 1986 DB San Diego Chargers1986–199535 Career INTs
Wayne Davis 1985 DB San Diego Chargers1985–19905 Career INTs
Craig Shaffer 1982 LB St. Louis Cardinals1982–198418 Career Games
Tunch Ilkin 1980 OL Pittsburgh Steelers1980–1993 Pittsburgh Steelers All-Time Team, 2x Pro Bowl Lineman

All-Star Game participants

Indiana Football Hall of Fame

  • Vincent Allen – 2000 [22]
  • Max Andress – 1976 [23]
  • George Ashworth (ISU Head Coach) – 1979 [24]
  • Steve Balash – 2009 [25]
  • Paul Beck – 1979 [26]
  • Phil Brown (ISU Head Coach) – 1985 [27]
  • Charles "Cocky" Bush – 1976 [28]
  • Bob Clayton – 2012 [29]
  • Robert Clements – 1988
  • Jim Conover – 1976 [30]
  • Rich Dodson – 2003
  • Stewart "Red" Faught – 1981 [31]
  • Wayne Fuson – 1974
  • Joe Goodman – 1998
  • Delby Humphrey – 1974
  • Jerry Huntsman (ISU Head Coach) – 1985 [15]
  • Bill Jones (ISU Head Coach) – 1981 [32]
  • Charlie Karazsia – 2006 [33]
  • Walter "Wally" Marks (ISU Head Coach) – 1974
  • Dick Martin – 1976
  • Bob Nesbit – 1976
  • Steve Purichia – 2014 [34]
  • R. Douglas Reeser – 2006
  • Ed Robertson – 1996
  • Tim Roth – 2014 [35]
  • Van "Rusty" Rutherford – 1976
  • Thomas Stirling – 1988
  • Kenneth "Zip" Sypult – 1987
  • Phil Teegarden – 2001
  • N.E. "Gene" Wernz – 1977
  • Mark Wildman – 2007
  • Roy Lee Williams – 1976
  • Ernie Zeller – 1979
  • Maurey Zlotnik – 2003

Future non-conference opponents

Announced schedules as of July 20, 2019. [36]

201920202021202220232024202520262027
at Kansas at Eastern Illinois at West Virginia at Purdue vs. Eastern Illinois at Eastern Illinois vs. Eastern Illinois at Eastern Illinois at Indiana
vs. Dayton at Middle Tennessee at Eastern Kentucky at Indiana at Purdue at Indiana at Purdue
vs. Eastern Kentucky vs. Lindenwood at Ball State
vs. Eastern Illinois

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References

  1. Color Palette (PDF). Indiana State Sycamores Official Style Guide. March 3, 2020. Retrieved March 4, 2020.
  2. "Indiana College Football Records". Kokomo Tribune . Kokomo, Indiana. Associated Press. November 16, 1964. p. 15. Retrieved November 13, 2019 via Newspapers.com Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg .
  3. https://gosycamores.com/sports/2010/6/2/204954465.aspx
  4. Indiana State University: About ISU: History and Traditions Archived 2012-07-08 at the Wayback Machine
  5. "Indiana State University Archives Home". Archived from the original on 2010-07-15. Retrieved 2010-05-21.
  6. "ISU's Towalid named top FCS defensive back". Terre Haute Tribune Star.
  7. (tm), e-yearbook.com. "E-Yearbook.com - Search and browse yearbooks online!". www.e-yearbook.com.
  8. "Shakir Bell Named To AFCA FCS Coaches' All-America Team". GoSycamores.com Official Web Site of Indiana State Athletics.
  9. "Shakir Bell And Ben Obaseki Named First Team Associated Press All-America". GoSycamores.com Official Web Site of Indiana State Athletics.
  10. "FCS football: STATS releases its 2015 All-America Team". 15 December 2015.
  11. "Alex Sewall Named First Team Academic All-American". GoSycamores.com – Official Web Site of Indiana State Athletics.
  12. "The Daily Banner 19 November 1965 — Hoosier State Chronicles: Indiana's Digital Historic Newspaper Program". newspapers.library.in.gov.
  13. "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2016-10-22. Retrieved 2016-09-13.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  14. "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2016-10-22. Retrieved 2016-09-13.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  15. 1 2 "HUNTSMAN, JERRY – Indiana Football Hall of Fame". indiana-football.org.
  16. "Trent Miles Earns 2010 AFCA Regional Coach Of The Year Honors". GoSycamores.com Official Web Site of Indiana State Athletics.
  17. http://www.georgiastatesports.com/ViewArticle.dbml?DB_OEM_ID=12700&ATCLID=205820045
  18. "Mike Sanford Named AFCA Regional Coach Of The Year". GoSycamores.com – Official Web Site of Indiana State Athletics.
  19. 1 2 3 https://www.indiana-football.org/?q=node/420
  20. https://www.indiana-football.org/?q=node/403
  21. 1 2 3 http://www.mvc.org/football/honors.pdf
  22. "ALLEN, VINCENT – Indiana Football Hall of Fame". indiana-football.org.
  23. "ANDRESS, MAX – Indiana Football Hall of Fame". indiana-football.org.
  24. "ASHWORTH, GEORGE – Indiana Football Hall of Fame". indiana-football.org.
  25. "BALASH, STEVE – Indiana Football Hall of Fame". indiana-football.org.
  26. "BECK, PAUL – Indiana Football Hall of Fame". indiana-football.org.
  27. "BROWN, PHIL – Indiana Football Hall of Fame". indiana-football.org.
  28. "BUSH, CHARLES "COCKY" – Indiana Football Hall of Fame". indiana-football.org.
  29. "CLAYTON, BOB – Indiana Football Hall of Fame". indiana-football.org.
  30. "CONOVER, JAMES "JIM" – Indiana Football Hall of Fame". indiana-football.org.
  31. "FAUGHT, STEWART "RED" – Indiana Football Hall of Fame". indiana-football.org.
  32. "JONES, WILLIAM – Indiana Football Hall of Fame". indiana-football.org.
  33. "KARAZSIA, CHARLIE – Indiana Football Hall of Fame". indiana-football.org.
  34. "PURICHIA, STEVE – Indiana Football Hall of Fame". indiana-football.org.
  35. "ROTH, TIM – Indiana Football Hall of Fame". indiana-football.org.
  36. "Indiana State Sycamores Football Schedules and Future Schedules" . Retrieved September 21, 2018.