1974 NCAA Division II football season

Last updated
1974 NCAA Division II football season
Regular seasonSeptember – November 1974
PlayoffsNovember – December 1974
National Championship Hughes Stadium
Sacramento, CA
Champion Central Michigan

The 1974 NCAA Division II football season, part of college football in the United States organized by the National Collegiate Athletic Association at the Division II level, began in September and concluded with the Division II Championship on December 14 at Hughes Stadium in Sacramento, California.

Contents

Central Michigan defeated Delaware 54–15 in the Camellia Bowl to win their only Division II national title. [1] [2] CMU moved up to Division I in 1975.

Conference standings

1974 Big Sky Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
No. 5 Boise State $^600  1020
Montana State 420  730
Idaho 221  281
Montana 231  361
Northern Arizona 230  360
Idaho State 240  550
Weber State 150  470
  • $ Conference champion
  • ^ NCAA Division II playoff participant
Rankings from NCAA College Division AP Poll
1974 California Collegiate Athletic Association football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
UC Riverside $400  830
Cal Poly 211  541
Cal Poly Pomona 112  532
Cal State Northridge 130  290
Cal State Los Angeles 031  541
  • $ Conference champion
1974 Central Intercollegiate Athletic Association football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Norfolk State $800  820
Virginia Union 710  820
Livingstone 510  830
Johnson C. Smith 420  470
Hampton 340  370
Elizabeth City State 350  370
Winston-Salem State 350  470
Virginia State 240  370
Shaw 250  460
Fayetteville State 260  470
Saint Paul's (VA) 060  180
  • $ Conference champion
1974 Far Western Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
UC Davis $500  910
San Francisco State 230  560
Humboldt State 230  460
Chico State 230  470
Cal State Hayward 230  360
Sacramento State 230  290
  • $ Conference champion
Rankings from College Division poll
1974 Indiana Collegiate Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Butler $600  820
Evansville ^510  820
DePauw 420  730
Indiana Central 240  550
Wabash 240  550
Valparaiso 240  360
Saint Joseph's (IN) 060  090
  • $ Conference champion
  • ^ NCAA Division III playoff participant
1974 Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
South Carolina State $510  840
Howard 411  821
North Carolina Central 411  722
Morgan State 420  550
North Carolina A&T 240  560
Maryland Eastern Shore 150  260
Delaware State 060  360
  • $ Conference champion
1974 Missouri Intercollegiate Athletic Association football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
NW Missouri State $510  820
Missouri–Rolla 411  641
SW Missouri State 420  730
SE Missouri State 420  740
NE Missouri State 240  470
Central Missouri State 141  371
Lincoln (MO) *060  380
1974 North Central Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
South Dakota +520  830
North Dakota State +520  740
North Dakota +520  640
South Dakota State 430  650
Mankato State 331  541
Northern Iowa 331  541
Augustana (SD) 250  460
Morningside 070  090
  • + Conference co-champions
1974 Ohio Valley Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Eastern Kentucky $610  820
Murray State 520  920
Western Kentucky 520  730
Tennessee Tech 430  650
East Tennessee State 331  461
Middle Tennessee 250  380
Austin Peay 151  371
Morehead State 160  380
  • $ Conference champion
1974 Southland Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
No. 2 Louisiana Tech $^500  1110
Lamar 410  820
Arkansas State 320  730
McNeese State 230  641
Texas–Arlington 140  1100
SW Louisiana 050  290
  • $ Conference champion
  • ^ NCAA Division II playoff participant
Rankings from AP Poll
1974 Southwestern Athletic Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
Team W L    W L 
No. 14 AP / #13 UPI Alcorn State +^ 51    92 
No. 7 AP / #6 UPI Grambling State + 51    111 
Jackson State  42    73 
Southern  33    83 
Texas Southern  33    64 
Mississippi Valley State  15    55 
Prairie View A&M  06    010 
  • + Conference co-champions
  • ^ – College Division playoff participant
Rankings from College Division poll
1974 Virginia College Athletic Association football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Virginia Union 200  820
Randolph–Macon 401  621
Hampden–Sydney 410  640
Virginia State 210  370
Madison 320  640
Hampton 120  370
Bridgewater 130  450
Washington and Lee 021  181
Emory & Henry 030  380
Saint Paul's (VA) 030  180
1974 Yankee Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
UMass +420  560
Maine +420  460
New Hampshire 330  540
Rhode Island 330  550
Boston University 330  541
Connecticut 330  460
Vermont 150  460
  • + Conference co-champions
1974 NCAA Division II independents football records
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
No. 1 Central Michigan ^    1210
No. 6 UNLV ^    1210
No. 4 Delaware ^    1220
Tennessee State     820
No. 12 Youngstown State ^    820
Santa Clara     730
Wayne State (MI)     730
Northeastern     640
Central State (OH)     650
Akron     550
Indiana State     550
Nevada     560
Portland State     560
Eastern Michigan     461
Milwaukee     460
Northeast Louisiana     460
Arkansas–Pine Bluff     350
Chattanooga     470
Nebraska–Omaha     370
Bucknell     280
Northern Michigan     0100
  • ^ NCAA Division II playoff participant
Rankings from Associated Press poll

Conference summaries

Conference Champions

Big Sky Conference – Boise State
Central Intercollegiate Athletic Association – Norfolk State
Far Western Football Conference – UC Davis
Great Lakes Intercollegiate Athletic Conference – Ferris State and Northwood
Gulf South Conference – Jacksonville State
Lone Star Conference – Texas A&I
Missouri Intercollegiate Athletic Association – Northwest Missouri State
North Central Conference – North Dakota State, North Dakota, and South Dakota
Northern Intercollegiate Conference – Michigan Tech
Rocky Mountain Athletic Conference – Western State
Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Conference (Division II) – Tuskegee
Yankee Conference – Maine and Massachusetts

Postseason

1974 NCAA Division II Football Championship
Teams8
Finals Site
Champion
Runner-up
Semifinalists
Winning Coach

The 1974 NCAA Division II Football Championship playoffs were the second single-elimination tournament to determine the national champion of NCAA Division II college football.

The four quarterfinal games were played on campus and all four host teams advanced. The semifinals were the Pioneer Bowl in Wichita Falls, Texas, and the Grantland Rice Bowl in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. The championship game was the Camellia Bowl, held at Hughes Stadium in Sacramento, California for the second consecutive year. The Central Michigan Chippewas defeated the Delaware Fightin' Blue Hens 54–14 to win their first national title. [1] [3] After opening with a home loss to Division I Kent State, CMU won twelve straight to finish as D-II champions. [1]

Playoff bracket

First round
Campus sites

November 30
Semifinals
Pioneer Bowl
Grantland Rice Bowl
December 7
Championship
Camellia Bowl
Hughes Stadium
Sacramento, CA
December 14
         
Central Michigan *20
Boise State 6
Central Michigan35
Louisiana Tech 14
Louisiana Tech *10
Western Carolina 7
Central Michigan54
Delaware 14
UNLV *35
Alcorn State 22
UNLV 11
Delaware49
Delaware *35
Youngstown State 14

*Denotes host institution

Rankings

In 1974, United Press International (UPI) and the Associated Press (AP) ranked teams in their College Division or "small college" polls – which had started in 1958 and 1960, respectively – for the final time. UPI published their final poll at the end of the regular season, while the AP waited until postseason games had been completed. UPI's number one selection was the Louisiana Tech Bulldogs, who during the regular season were 10–0 while outscoring opponents 294–103. The Bulldogs later lost in the playoffs to the Central Michigan Chippewas, winners of the tournament. AP's number one selection was the Chippewas, who were 9–1 during the regular season and finished with an overall record of 12–1 while outscoring opponents 450–127.

See also

Related Research Articles

The NCAA Division II Football Championship is an American college football tournament played annually to determine a champion at the NCAA Division II level. It was first held in 1973, as a single-elimination tournament with eight teams. The tournament field has subsequently been expanded three times; in 1988 it became 16 teams, in 2004 it became 24 teams, and in 2016 it became 28 teams.

NCAA Division I Football Championship

The NCAA Division I Football Championship is an annual post-season college football game, played since 2006, used to determine a national champion of the NCAA Division I Football Championship Subdivision (FCS). From 1978 to 2005, the game was known as the NCAA Division I-AA Football Championship.

Grantland Rice Bowl Defunct college football bowl game

The Grantland Rice Bowl was an annual college football bowl game from 1964 through 1977, in the NCAA's College Division, for smaller universities and colleges, and later Division II. The game was named for Grantland Rice, an early 20th century American sportswriter known for his elegant prose, and was originally played in his hometown of Murfreesboro, Tennessee.

Central Michigan Chippewas football

The Central Michigan Chippewas are a college football program in Division I FBS, representing Central Michigan University (CMU). CMU has the 30th highest overall winning percentage of programs playing in NCAA Division I.

Central Michigan Chippewas

The Central Michigan Chippewas are the intercollegiate athletic teams that represent Central Michigan University (CMU), located in Mount Pleasant, Michigan. The school fields sixteen men's and women's intercollegiate teams that compete at the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I level.

Louisiana Tech Bulldogs football College football organization

The Louisiana Tech Bulldogs football team represent Louisiana Tech University in college football at the NCAA Division I Football Bowl Subdivision level. After 12 seasons in the Western Athletic Conference, Louisiana Tech began competing as a member of Conference USA in 2013. Since then, the Bulldogs have been coached by Skip Holtz and have won their last 6 consecutive bowl games. Since 1968, the Bulldogs have played their home games at Joe Aillet Stadium. Since the Bulldogs first season in 1901, Louisiana Tech has compiled an all-time record of 630 wins, 465 losses, and 39 ties. In 118 football seasons, the Bulldogs have won 3 Division II national championships, won 25 conference championships, and played in 27 postseason games including 12 major college bowl games.

The Humboldt State Lumberjacks football program represented Humboldt State University in college football and played their home games at the Redwood Bowl in Arcata, California. Humboldt State was a member of the Great Northwest Athletic Conference in NCAA Division II. Through the 2017 season, the Lumberjacks have played 89 seasons and have an all-time record of 402–395–21 (.504).

The 1973 Louisiana Tech Bulldogs football team represented Louisiana Tech University during the 1973 NCAA Division II football season, and completed the 71st season of Bulldogs football and their first as members of the reorganized NCAA Division II. The Bulldogs played their home games in at Joe Aillet Stadium in Ruston, Louisiana. The 1973 team came off an undefeated 12–0 record, and a College Division National Championship from the prior season. The 1973 team was led by coach Maxie Lambright. The team finished the regular season with a 9–1 record and made the inaugural NCAA Division II playoffs. They made the first NCAA Division II Football Championship Game with a 38–34 win over Boise State in the Pioneer Bowl. The Bulldogs defeated the Western Kentucky Hilltoppers 34–0 in the Camellia Bowl National Championship Game.

The 1974 Louisiana Tech Bulldogs football team was an American football team that represented Louisiana Tech University as a member of the Southland Conference during the 1974 NCAA Division II football season. In their eighth year under head coach Maxie Lambright, the team compiled a 11–1 record, were UPI College Division national champion, Southland Conference champion, and lost to Central Michigan in the Pioneer Bowl.

The 1973 NCAA Division II football season, part of college football in the United States organized by the National Collegiate Athletic Association at the Division II level. The season began in September and concluded with the Division II Championship on December 15 at Hughes Stadium in Sacramento, California. This was the first season for Division II football, which were formerly in the College Division in 1972 and prior.

The 1975 NCAA Division II football season, part of college football in the United States organized by the National Collegiate Athletic Association at the Division II level, began in September and concluded with the Division II Championship on December 13 at Hughes Stadium in Sacramento, California.

The 1974 Central Michigan Chippewas football team was an American football team that represented Central Michigan University during the 1974 NCAA Division II football season. In their eighth season under head coach Roy Kramer, the Chippewas compiled a 12–1 record, losing the opening game to Kent State and then winning 12 straight games.

The 1975 Northern Michigan Wildcats football team represented Northern Michigan University during the 1975 NCAA Division II football season. Led by second-year head coach Gil Krueger, the Wildcats compiled a 13–1 record, with victories over Central Michigan (17–16), Nebraska–Omaha (41–14), Youngstown State (15–0), Eastern Michigan (20–7), and Boise State (24–21) in Idaho in the quarterfinals of the Division II playoffs.

The 1968 Humboldt State Lumberjacks football team represented Humboldt State College during the 1968 NCAA College Division football season. Humboldt State competed in the Far Western Conference (FWC).

The 1963 NCAA College Division football season was played by American football teams representing 299 colleges and universities recognized the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) as minor programs. The remaining 120 colleges and universities that were NCAA members and fielded football teams competed in the 1963 NCAA University Division football season.

The 1964 NCAA College Division football season was the ninth season of college football in the United States organized by the National Collegiate Athletic Association at the NCAA College Division level.

The 1966 NCAA College Division football season was the 11th season of college football in the United States organized by the National Collegiate Athletic Association at the NCAA College Division level.

The 1971 NCAA College Division football season was the 16th season of college football in the United States organized by the National Collegiate Athletic Association at the NCAA College Division level.

The 1972 NCAA College Division football season was the 17th and final season of college football in the United States organized by the National Collegiate Athletic Association at the NCAA College Division level.

The 1980 NCAA Division I-AA Football Championship Game was a postseason college football game between the Eastern Kentucky Colonels and the Boise State Broncos. The game was played on December 20, 1980, at Hughes Stadium in Sacramento, California. The culminating game of the 1980 NCAA Division I-AA football season, it was won by Boise State, 31–29.

References

  1. 1 2 3 "Central Michigan destroys Delaware". Eugene Register-Guard. (Oregon). Associated Press. December 15, 1974. p. 6D.
  2. "1974 NCAA Division II National Football Championship Bracket" (PDF). NCAA. NCAA.org. p. 13. Retrieved January 2, 2014.
  3. "1974 NCAA Division II Football Championship Bracket" (PDF). NCAA. NCAA.org. p. 13. Retrieved December 18, 2013.
  4. "Louisiana Tech Wins UPI Football Title". The Minneapolis Star . Minneapolis, MN. November 27, 1974. p. 2D. Retrieved July 30, 2021 via Newspapers.com Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg .
  5. "A.P. final small college football ranking". Great Bend Tribune. Great Bend, Kansas. Associated Press. December 24, 1974. p. 3. Retrieved July 30, 2021 via Newspapers.com Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg .