1936 college football season

Last updated

The 1936 college football season was the first in which the Associated Press writers' poll selected a national champion. The first AP poll, taken of 35 writers, was released on October 20, 1936. Each writer listed his choice for the top ten teams, and points were tallied based on 10 for first place, 9 for second, etc., and the AP then ranked the twenty teams with the highest number of points. [2] In the first poll, Minnesota received 32 first place votes, and 3 votes for an additional 25 points, for a total of 345 altogether.

Contents

The 1936 season also saw the addition of another major New Year's Day bowl game, as Dallas hosted the first Cotton Bowl Classic.

Conference and program changes

Conference changes

Membership changes

School1935 Conference1936 Conference
The Citadel Bulldogs SIAA Southern
Davidson Wildcats Independent Southern
Furman Paladins SIAA Southern
George Washington Colonials Independent Southern
Richmond Spiders Virginia Southern
St. Francis (NY) Terriers IndependentDropped Program
Virginia Cavaliers Southern Independent
Wake Forest Demon Deacons Independent Southern
William & Mary Indians Virginia Southern

September

September 19 TCU opened with a 6–0 win at Howard Payne College at Brownwood, Texas.

September 26 In Seattle, Minnesota opened its season with a 14–7 win over Washington.

Defending champ (under the Dickinson ratings) SMU had a tough time in beating North Texas, 6–0, and Rose Bowl winner Stanford lost its opener to visiting Santa Clara 13–0. Sugar Bowl winner TCU lost at Texas Tech 7–0. LSU beat visiting Rice 20–7. Alabama beat Samford 34–0 and Pittsburgh beat Ohio Wesleyan 53–0.

October

October 3 Santa Clara beat Loyola Marymount 13–6 LSU and Texas played to a 6–6 tie. Alabama defeated Clemson 32–0 Northwestern opened with an 18–7 win over Iowa. Pittsburgh beat West Virginia 34–0

October 10 Minnesota beat visiting Nebraska 7–0. Pittsburgh won at Ohio State 6–0 Washington won at UCLA 14–0 Santa Clara beat San Francisco 15–7. Alabama beat Mississippi State 7–0. Northwestern beat North Dakota State 40–7.

October 17 Minnesota defeated Michigan 26–0. Santa Clara won at San Jose State 20–0 In Birmingham, Alabama and Tennessee played to a 0–0 tie. Northwestern edged Ohio State 14–13. In a meeting between Pittsburgh's two unbeaten (3–0–0) and untied schools, Pittsburgh was beaten by Duquesne, 7–0. Washington beat Oregon State 19–7.

The first AP Poll was released on October 20, with Minnesota being the majority favorite, with 32 of 35 first place votes, and 345 out of 350 points. The Gophers were followed by 2.Duke 3.Army 4.Northwestern and 5.Purdue. USC, ranked No. 6, received one first place vote.

October 24 No. 1 Minnesota hosted No. 5 Purdue, in a meeting of unbeaten (3–0–0) schools. Minnesota proved the AP voters right by winning 33–0. No. 2 Duke (5–0–0) lost to (1–2–1) Tennessee, 15–13. No. 3 Army beat Springfield College 33–0. No. 4 Northwestern won at Illinois 13–2. No. 8 Washington beat California 13–0. No. 9 Pittsburgh beat visiting, and previously unbeaten, No. 7 Notre Dame 26–0. No. 16 Fordham edged visiting No. 12 St. Mary's 7–6. The next top five was 1.Minnesota 2.Pitt 3.Northwestern 4. Washington 5.Fordham

October 31 In a Friday night game, No. 1 Minnesota and No. 3 Northwestern, both unbeaten (4–0–0), met in a Big Ten conference game at Evanston. The Gophers had not lost a game in more than three years, and the game was scoreless after three quarters, until Northwestern's line "ripped a gaping hole in the Gophers' forward wall" and Steve Toth drove across the goal line. With five minutes left, Minnesota's Rudy Gmitro was in the clear for a touchdown before being brought down by Fred Vanzon, and Northwestern held on for the 6–0 win. [3]

At the Polo Grounds in New York, No. 2 Pittsburgh and No. 5 Fordham played to a 0–0 tie. In Portland, No. 4 Washington beat Oregon 7–0, but dropped to 6th. No. 10 Marquette beat visiting No. 20 St. Mary's 20–6 and rose to 4th place (the Warriors would give up football after 1960). The next top five was 1.Northwestern 2.Minnesota 3.Fordham 4.Marquette 5.Pitt.

November

November 7 No. 1 Northwestern beat Wisconsin 26–18. No. 2 Minnesota beat Iowa 52–0 No. 3 Fordham defeated visiting Purdue 15–0. No. 4 Marquette narrowly won in Omaha against Creighton, 7–6. No. 5 Pittsburgh beat Penn State 34–7.

No. 14 Alabama and No. 10 Tulane, both 5–0–1, met at Tuscaloosa. Alabama's 34–7 win was followed by its rise to 4th place in the poll.

November 14 No. 1 Northwestern won 9–0 at Michigan to clinch the Big Ten title, while No. 2 Minnesota beat Texas 47–19. No. 3 Fordham was idle. No. 4 Alabama beat Georgia Tech in Atlanta, 20–16. No. 5 Pittsburgh won at Nebraska 19–6 In Birmingham, No. 7 LSU beat Auburn 19–6 to extend its record to 7–0–1.

November 21 No. 1 Northwestern lost at No. 11 Notre Dame, 26–6, while No. 2 Minnesota won at Wisconsin 24–0 No. 3 Fordham and visiting Georgia played to a 7–7 tie. No. 4 Pittsburgh was idle. No. 5 LSU beat Lafayette College of Louisiana 93–0. No. 9 Santa Clara won in San Francisco at St. Mary's, 19–0. In the poll that followed, Northwestern—which had been one game away from a perfect season—fell to seventh place and Minnesota regained the top spot: 1.Minnesota 2.LSU 3.Alabama 4.Pitt 5.Santa Clara.

On November 26, Thanksgiving Day, No. 3 Alabama beat Vanderbilt 14–6 in Birmingham. No. 4 Pittsburgh beat its other crosstown rival, Carnegie Tech, 31–14. No. 6 Washington beat No. 20 Washington State 40–0. At Yankee Stadium Fordham, which had fallen to 8th, (5–0–2) lost to NYU, 7–6.

November 28 No. 2 LSU clinched the SEC title with a 33–0 win over No. 19 Tulane. No. 5 Santa Clara lost to No. 18 TCU, 9–0.

Conference standings

Major conference standings

1936 Big Six Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
No. 9 Nebraska $500  720
Missouri 311  621
Kansas State 212  432
Oklahoma 122  333
Iowa State 131  332
Kansas 050  161
  • $ Conference champion
Rankings from AP Poll
1936 Big Ten Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
No. 7 Northwestern $600  710
No. 1 Minnesota 410  710
Ohio State 410  530
Indiana 311  521
Purdue 311  521
Illinois 221  431
Chicago 140  251
Iowa 041  341
Wisconsin 040  260
Michigan 050  170
  • $ Conference champion
Rankings from AP Poll
1936 Border Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Arizona $301  523
Texas Mines 211  531
New Mexico A&M 320  641
Texas Tech 001  541
Arizona State–Flagstaff 221  341
Arizona State 240  450
New Mexico 140  270
  • $ Conference champion
  • Reference [4]
1936 Middle Three Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Lehigh $200  620
Rutgers 010  161
Lafayette 010  180
  • $ Conference champion
1936 Missouri Valley Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Creighton +300  440
Tulsa +300  522
Drake 320  442
Washington University 110  370
Oklahoma A&M 120  190
Washburn 140  261
Grinnell 030  270
  • + Conference co-champions
Rankings from AP Poll
1936 Pacific Coast Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
No. 5 Washington $701  721
Washington State 621  631
USC 322  423
California 430  650
UCLA 431  631
Stanford 232  252
Oregon State 350  460
Montana 130  630
Oregon 161  261
Idaho 040  370
  • $ Conference champion
Rankings from AP Poll
1936 Rocky Mountain Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Utah State $601  701
Denver 611  711
Utah 520  630
Colorado 420  430
Colorado State–Greeley 430  540
BYU 440  450
Colorado A&M 341  441
Colorado College 340  341
Wyoming 241  251
Montana State 140  350
Western State (CO) 150  160
Colorado Mines 060  260
  • $ Conference champion
1936 Southeastern Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
No. 2 LSU $600  911
No. 4 Alabama 501  801
Auburn 411  722
No. 17 Tennessee 312  622
Mississippi State 320  731
Georgia 330  541
Georgia Tech 331  551
Tulane 231  631
Vanderbilt 131  351
Kentucky 130  640
Florida 150  460
Ole Miss 031  552
Sewanee 050  061
  • $ Conference champion
1936 Southern Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
No. 11 Duke $700  910
North Carolina 610  820
Furman 410  720
VMI 420  640
Maryland 320  550
Clemson 330  550
Davidson 430  540
Washington and Lee 220  450
Wake Forest 220  540
NC State 240  370
VPI 450  550
South Carolina 250  570
Richmond 130  442
Virginia 150  270
The Citadel 040  460
William & Mary 050  180
  • $ Conference champion
Rankings from AP Poll
1936 Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Middle Tennessee +400  710
The Citadel +400  460
Miami (FL) 300  622
Centenary 200  642
Centre 200  540
Howard (AL) 201  531
Union (TN) 511  641
Rollins 410  710
Louisiana Tech 411  621
Morehead State 412  412
Eastern Kentucky 420  720
Mississippi State Teachers 421  721
Mississippi College 211  531
Western Kentucky 320  630
Presbyterian 320  370
Erskine 320  450
Louisiana Normal 321  541
Murray State 440  540
Mercer 111  361
Louisiana College 231  341
Louisville 230  440
Millsaps 122  352
Transylvania 131  341
Tennessee Tech 150  251
Georgetown (KY) 151  251
Loyola (LA) 010  460
Stetson 031  251
Union (KY) 032  242
SW Louisiana 041  271
Wofford 041  171
Newberry 041  1101
West Tennessee State 070  090
  • + Conference co-champions
1936 Southwest Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
No. 18 Arkansas $510  730
No. 16 TCU 411  922
Texas A&M 321  831
Baylor 321  631
SMU 231  541
Rice 150  570
Texas 150  261
  • $ Conference champion
Rankings from AP Poll

Independents

1936 Eastern college football independents records
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Saint Anselm     601
No. 3 Pittsburgh     811
No. 10 Penn     710
No. 12 Yale     710
No. 13 Dartmouth     711
Franklin & Marshall     711
No. 14 Duquesne     820
Boston College     612
No. 15 Fordham     512
Holy Cross     721
Villanova     721
Army     630
Colgate     630
Drexel     630
Temple     632
Buffalo     530
Columbia     530
NYU     531
Princeton     422
Manhattan     640
La Salle     641
Northeastern     540
Bucknell     441
CCNY     440
Tufts     331
Harvard     341
Cornell     350
Penn State     350
Brown     370
Carnegie Tech     260
Massachusetts State     260
Syracuse     170
Rankings from AP Poll
1936 Midwestern college football independents records
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
DePaul     720
No. 20 Marquette     720
Michigan State     612
Michigan State Normal     620
Akron     621
No. 8 Notre Dame     621
Wayne     521
Detroit     730
Xavier     640
Saint Louis     541
Central Michigan     341
Western State (MI)     240
Rankings from AP Poll
1936 Southern college football independents records
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
George Washington     711
Hardin–Simmons     920
Georgetown     621
Western Maryland     731
No. 18 Navy     630
West Virginia     640
East Carolina     320
Catholic University     440
Oklahoma City     440
William & Mary Norfolk Division     440
Delaware     260
South Georgia Teachers     280
Rankings from AP Poll
1936 Western college football independents records
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
No. 6 Santa Clara     810
Humboldt State     630
Loyola (CA)     630
Saint Mary's     631
Gonzaga     530
Pomona     640
Cal Poly     540
San Jose State     540
Idaho Southern Branch     440
San Francisco     442
Portland     340
San Francisco State     231
Hawaii     350
Rankings from AP Poll

Minor conferences

ConferenceChampion(s)Record
Alamo Conference Texas A&I 1–1
Central Intercollegiate Athletics Association Virginia State College 6–0–2
Central Intercollegiate Athletic Conference Kansas State Teachers–Hays 4–0
Far Western Conference Pacific 6–0
Indiana Intercollegiate Conference Wabash 7–0
Iowa Intercollegiate Athletic Conference Parsons 6–0
Kansas Collegiate Athletic Conference Kansas Wesleyan 4–0–1
Lone Star Conference North Texas State Teachers 4–0
Michigan Intercollegiate Athletic Association Kalamazoo 7–0–1
Midwest Collegiate Athletic Conference Carleton
Coe
3–0
4–0
Minnesota Intercollegiate Athletic Conference Gustavus Adolphus
Saint John's (MN)
5–0
4–0
Missouri Intercollegiate Athletic Association Northeast Missouri State Teachers 5–0
Nebraska College Athletic Conference Hastings 4–0
Nebraska Intercollegiate Athletic Association Nebraska State Teachers 3–0
North Central Intercollegiate Athletic Conference North Dakota 4–0
North Dakota College Athletic Conference North Dakota Science 6–0–0
Northern Teachers Athletic Conference St. Cloud State Teachers 4–0
Ohio Athletic Conference Marietta 8–0
Oklahoma Collegiate Athletic Conference Central State Teachers (OK) 6–0
Pacific Northwest Conference Willamette 6–0
Pennsylvania State Athletic Conference Lock Haven State Teachers 6–0–2
South Dakota Intercollegiate Conference Augustana (SD) 4–0
Southern California Intercollegiate Athletic Conference San Diego State 5–0
Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Conference Tuskegee
Southwestern Athletic Conference Langston
Texas College
4–1–1
Texas Collegiate Athletic Conference Howard Payne 5–0–1
Tri-Normal League State Normal–Cheney 2–0
Wisconsin State Teachers College Conference North: Superior State Teachers
South: Stevens Point State Teachers
4–0
2–1–1

Minor conference standings

1936 Alamo Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
St. Mary's (TX) +110  732
Texas A&I +110  640
Sul Ross +110  431
  • + Conference co-champions
1936 Central Intercollegiate Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Fort Hays State $400  630
Pittsburg State 310  350
Emporia Teachers 220  640
Wichita 130  450
Southwestern (KS) 040  170
  • $ Conference champion
1936 Colored Intercollegiate Athletic Association football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Virginia State $702  902
Morgan 502  602
Bluefield State 303  324
Hampton 520  521
North Carolina College 331  431
North Carolina A&T 440  540
Shaw 330  330
Johnson C. Smith 121  233
Saint Paul's (VA) 251  251
Virginia Union 251  251
Lincoln (PA) 140  140
St. Augustine's 040  040
Howard 040  050
  • $ Conference champion
1936 Dixie Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Howard (AL) $411  531
Southwestern (TN) 311  721
Chattanooga 311  521
Birmingham–Southern 430  450
Mississippi College 220  531
Loyola (LA) 220  460
Millsaps 230  352
Mercer 021  351
Spring Hill 050  360
  • $ Conference champion
1936 Far Western Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Pacific (CA) $400  541
Fresno State 210  531
Nevada 220  440
Cal Aggies 120  340
Chico State 040  161
  • $ Conference champion
1936 Illinois Intercollegiate Athletic Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Illinois Wesleyan +501  531
St. Viator +300  520
Bradley 620  630
North Central 311  421
Lake Forest 210  421
Wheaton (IL) 212  322
Southern Illinois 321  270
Western Illinois 321  322
Northern Illinois State 321  431
Illinois College 221  431
Monmouth (IL) 220  440
Augustana (IL) 330  350
Illinois State 231  342
Millikin 240  350
Eastern Illinois 240  440
Knox (IL) 120  350
Eureka 251  251
Elmhurst 131  331
Carthage 141  251
Shurtleff 010  040
McKendree 040  260
  • + Conference co-champions
1936 Indiana Intercollegiate Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Butler $500  602
Indiana State 201  232
Wabash 610  710
Saint Joseph's (IN) 311  311
Central Normal 420  430
DePauw 322  332
Manchester 530  530
Ball State 331  341
Franklin (IN) 340  350
Evansville 232  332
Valparaiso 131  161
Hanover 130  160
Earlham 140  241
Rose Poly 150  250
Oakland City 060  080
  • $ Conference champion
1936 Kansas Collegiate Athletic Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Kansas Wesleyan $401  711
McPherson 311  531
Bethany (KS) 311  422
Ottawa 122  342
Baker 140  260
College of Emporia 041  541
  • $ Conference champion
1936 Lone Star Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
North Texas State $400  621
East Texas State 310  820
Stephen F. Austin 220  431
Southwest Texas State 130  252
Sam Houston State 040  270
  • $ Conference champion
1936 Minnesota Intercollegiate Athletic Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Gustavus Adolphus +500  510
Saint John's (MN) +400  520
Concordia (MN) 320  350
St. Olaf 220  331
Hamline 130  160
Saint Mary's (MN) 130  180
Macalester 140  160
St. Thomas (MN) 140  170
  • + Conference co-champions
1936 Missouri College Athletic Union football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Missouri Valley +310  530
William Jewell +310  430
Tarkio 210  431
Culver–Stockton 120  540
Central Methodist 040  090
  • + Conference co-champions
1936 Missouri Intercollegiate Athletic Association football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Kirksville State $500  700
Central Missouri State 410  620
SE Missouri State 320  450
NW Missouri State 131  441
Missouri Mines 032  142
SW Missouri State 041  152
  • $ Conference champion
1936 Nebraska College Athletic Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Hastings $400  810
Nebraska Wesleyan 310  530
Midland 220  530
York (NE) 130  630
Doane 040  052
  • $ Conference champion
1936 Nebraska Intercollegiate Athletic Association football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Kearney State $300  720
Chadron State 210  430
Peru State 120  251
Wayne State (NE) 030  380
  • $ Conference champion
1936 New England Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Connecticut State $200  720
Maine 100  430
Rhode Island State 120  540
New Hampshire 010  332
  • $ Conference champion
1936 North Central Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
North Dakota $400  920
South Dakota 310  432
North Dakota Agricultural 220  450
Morningside 230  340
Omaha 122  232
Iowa State Teachers 121  522
South Dakota State 141  361
  • $ Conference champion
1936 North State Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Elon $300  650
Appalachian State 310  522
Catawba 320  550
Lenoir–Rhyne 230  361
Western Carolina 120  270
Guilford 040  270
  • $ Conference champion
1936 Ohio Athletic Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Marietta $400  520
Baldwin–Wallace 200  710
Muskingum 510  630
Case 410  540
Mount Union 310  711
Kent State 420  540
Toledo 210  260
Ohio Northern 421  422
Wittenberg 320  450
Capital 321  421
Bowling Green 213  423
Heidelberg 331  341
Wooster 340  360
Kenyon 130  340
Oberlin 130  350
Ashland 260  260
John Carroll 130  270
Otterbein 070  170
Findlay 050  070
  • $ Conference champion
1936 Oklahoma Collegiate Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Central State (OK) $600  810
Northeastern State 411  621
SE Oklahoma State 330  470
East Central 230  540
Oklahoma Baptist 121  442
NW Oklahoma State 140  170
SW Oklahoma State 042  173
  • $ Conference champion
1936 Pennsylvania State Teachers Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Lock Haven $602  000
Shippensburg 610  710
Mansfield 410  430
Slippery Rock 310  630
Indiana (PA) 421  421
West Chester 110  441
Kutztown 111  521
California (PA) 340  341
Edinboro 130  140
Millersville 140  340
Bloomsburg 160  170
East Stroudsburg 030  260
Clarion 040  060
  • $ Conference champion
1936 Smoky Mountain Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Carson–Newman $700  1000
Appalachian State 400  810
Maryville 420  550
Teachers College (TN) 430  530
Milligan 330  540
King 330  550
Cumberland (TN) 130  361
Tusculum 060  270
Western Carolina 060  270
  • $ Conference champion
1936 South Dakota Intercollegiate Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Augustana (SD) +400  810
Dakota Wesleyan +501  521
Northern State 420  620
Spearfish 211  511
Yankton 321  431
Southern Normal 220  520
Huron 240  350
South Dakota Mines 130  161
Eastern Normal 040  050
Sioux Falls 051  071
  • + Conference co-champions
1936 Southern California Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
San Diego State $500  611
Santa Barbara State 410  910
Whittier 320  550
Redlands 230  260
Occidental 140  351
La Verne 050  170
  • $ Conference champion
1936 Southwestern Athletic Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Texas College +      
Langston +      
  • + Conference co-champions
1936 Texas Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Howard Payne $501  721
Daniel Baker 510  722
McMurry 511  811
Austin 330  442
Southwestern (TX) 141  461
Abilene Christian 141  171
St. Edward's 140  151
Trinity (TX) 042  063
  • $ Conference champion

Rankings

Bowl games

Bowl gameWinning teamLosing team
Rose Bowl No. 3 Pittsburgh 21No. 5 Washington 0
Sugar Bowl No. 6 Santa Clara 21No. 2 LSU 14
Orange Bowl No. 14 Duquesne 13 Mississippi State 12
Cotton Bowl Classic No. 16 TCU 16No. 20 Marquette 6
Sun Bowl Hardin–Simmons 34 Texas Mines 6
Bacardi Bowl Auburn 7 Villanova 7

"There is no longer any blot left on Pittsburgh's Rose Bowl escutcheon", wrote Grantland Rice. "Here was a Panther who belonged to the jungle and not to the zoo-- a fast, hard driving slashing Panther who put both fang and claw to work in beating Washington's Huskies 21 to 0 before 87,200 chilly witnesses.". [5]

Pittsburgh had been ranked No. 3 by the AP, behind No. 2 LSU, which met Santa Clara in the Sugar Bowl. No. 1 ranked Minnesota, like other Big Ten Conference teams, was not allowed to play postseason. LSU had lost the previous Sugar Bowl to TCU, by a 3–2 score. A crowd of 41,000 turned out in New Orleans to see the Tigers lose again. The Santa Clara Broncos took a 14–0 lead in the first quarter and won 21–14. [6]

A crowd of 17,000 turned out in Dallasto watch the first Cotton Bowl. Sammy Baugh of TCU completed only 5 of 13 pass attempts, but had 110 yards and a touchdown as TCU beat Marquette, 16–6. [7]

In the first annual [8] Orange Bowl, 12,000 filled the stands in Miami to see the Duquesne beat the Mississippi State, 13–12. Boyd Brumbaugh scored Duquesne's first touchdown and made the only extra point by either side. [9]

Villanova tied Auburn, 7–7, in the Bacardi Bowl, played before 6,000 spectators in Havana, Cuba, Tuskegee beat Prairie View State, 6–0, in Houston before 3,000, and Hardin–Simmons beat Texas Mines, 34–6, at the Sun Bowl in El Paso, Texas.

Heisman Trophy

1935 had been the first year that the Heisman Trophy was ever awarded, although it was named differently in the first year. It was known simply as the "DAC Trophy" for its inaugural year. In 1936, John Heisman died and the trophy that is awarded to the best college football player in the US was renamed in his honor. Larry Kelley, the second winner of the award was the first man to win it officially named as the "Heisman Trophy." [10]

The Slippery Rock National Championship

Due to the confusion and controversy associated with who should be crowned the 1936 national champion, a number of sportswriters across the country jokingly nominated several small colleges based on a sort of backtracking arithmetic, where the small college would have beaten team B, which defeated team C, which upset team D, which defeated one or several of the real national championship contenders. These were Minnesota (consensus), Pitt (BS, CFRA, HS), Duke (SR, WS), or LSU (BQPRS). The most well prominent and well known claim for the national championship via transitive property, was tiny Slippery Rock college, who made its case by beating Westminster, which defeated West Virginia Wesleyan, which beat No. 14 Duquesne, which upset No. 3 Pitt, which beat former No. 1 Notre Dame, which upset former No. 1 Northwestern, which defeated AP national champion Minnesota. The claim gave Slippery Rock College wide notoriety throughout the country, and is one of the reasons why certain football teams, most notably Michigan and Texas, broadcast the Slippery Rock score during halftime of their football games. [11] [12] [13] [14]

Other claims to the 1936 national championship via transitive property were St. Vincent college of Latrobe, PA, which followed much of Slippery Rock's line of successive wins, beating West Virginia Wesleyan 6 to 0 early in the 1936 season. A case was made for Indiana State Teachers college, which tied Lock Haven, who beat West Chester, which defeated Waynesburg, which connected to the Slippery Rock and St. Vincent's claims by defeated West Virginia Wesyleyan 14 to 7. [15] A week before Thanksgiving, St. Thomas college of Pennsylvania was given national championship recognition after defeating St. Vincent 13 to 6. [16]

See also

Related Research Articles

The NCAA was without a playoff for the major college football teams in the University Division, later known as Division I-A, during the 20th century. The NCAA recognizes Division I-A national champions based on the final results of polls including the "wire service", FWAA and NFF. The 1964 AP poll continued to rank only ten teams, compiling the votes of 55 sportswriters, each of whom would give their opinion of the ten best. Under a point system of 10 points for first place, 9 for second, etc., the "overall" ranking was determined.

The 1962 NCAA University Division football season was played by American football teams representing 140 colleges and universities recognized by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) as major programs. The remaining 370 colleges and universities that were NCAA members and fielded football teams competed in the 1962 NCAA College Division football season.

During the 20th century, the NCAA had no playoff for the major college football teams in the University Division, later known as Division I-A. The NCAA did recognize a national champion based upon the final results of "wire service" polls. The "writers' poll" by Associated Press (AP) was the most popular, followed by the "coaches' poll" by United Press International) (UPI). Prior to 1965, both services issued their final polls at the close of the regular season, but before teams competed in bowl games. For the 1965 season, the AP took its final poll after the postseason games, an arrangement made permanent in 1968. The Associated Press presented the "AP Trophy" to the winner.

During the 20th century, the NCAA had no playoff for the major college football teams in the University Division, later known as Division I-A. The NCAA did recognize a national champion based upon the final results of "wire service" polls. The extent of that recognition came in the form of acknowledgment in the annual 'NCAA Football Guide of the "unofficial" national champions. The AP poll in 1961 consisted of the votes of 45 sportswriters, each of whom would give their opinion of the ten best teams. Under a point system of 10 points for first place, 9 for second, etc., the "overall" ranking was determined. Although the rankings were based on the collective opinion of the representative sportswriters, the teams that remained "unbeaten and untied" were generally ranked higher than those that had not. A defeat, even against a strong opponent, tended to cause a team to drop in the rankings, and a team with two or more defeats was unlikely to remain in the Top 10. The top teams played on New Year's Day in the four major postseason bowl games: the Rose, Sugar, Orange (Miami) and Cotton (Dallas).

The 1960 NCAA University Division football season marked the last time that the University of Minnesota was a national champion on the gridiron. Murray Warmath's Minnesota Gophers were not in the Top 20 in preseason polling, but received the AP Trophy at the end of the regular season while Ole Miss received the FWAA trophy.

The 1959 NCAA University Division football season saw Syracuse University crowned as the national champion by both final polls, the AP writers poll and the UPI coaches polls.

The 1973 NCAA Division I football season was the first for the NCAA's current three-division structure. Effective with the 1973–74 academic year, schools formerly in the NCAA "University Division" were classified as Division I. Schools in the former "College Division" were classified into Division II, which allowed fewer athletic scholarships than Division I, and Division III, in which athletic scholarships were prohibited.

The 1975 NCAA Division I football season saw University of Oklahoma repeat as national champion in the Associated Press (AP) writers' poll, and were ranked No. 1 in the United Press International (UPI) coaches' poll, just ahead of runner up Arizona State, runner-up in both final polls, despite having an undefeated 12–0 season and a win over Nebraska in the Fiesta Bowl.

The 1976 NCAA Division I football season ended with a championship for the Panthers of the University of Pittsburgh. Led by head coach Johnny Majors, the Pitt Panthers brought a college football championship to the home of the defending pro football champions, the Steelers. Pitt also had the Heisman Trophy winner, Tony Dorsett; the Panthers had been ranked ninth in the preseason AP poll.

The 1977 NCAA Division I football season was one in which the top five teams finished with 11–1 records. Notre Dame, which beat top-ranked and undefeated Texas in the Cotton Bowl, became the national champion.

1932 college football season

The 1932 college football season saw the Michigan Wolverines win the Knute Rockne Memorial Trophy as national champion under the Dickinson System. Because the "Big Nine" conference didn't permit its teams to play in the postseason, however, the Wolverines were not able to accept a bid to the Rose Bowl. As such, the Pasadena game matched the No. 2 and No. 3 teams, USC and Pittsburgh, with the USC Trojans winning the East-West matchup 35–0.

The 1934 college football season was the 66th season of college football in the United States. Two New Year's Day bowl games were initiated to rival the Rose Bowl Game. On February 15, Warren V. Miller and Joseph M. Cousins organized the New Orleans Mid-Winter Sports Association and by October, the group had enough funds to sponsor the Sugar Bowl. Meanwhile, W. Keith Phillips and the Greater Miami Athletic Club worked in November at a January 1 game for Florida, and the Orange Bowl was created.

The 1935 college football season was the last one before the Associated Press writers' poll was used in selecting the national champion. The Williamson System, calculated by Paul O. Williamson out of New Orleans, deemed Texas Christian University (TCU) as the best in the nation. The Dickinson System, consisting of the calculations of University of Illinois Professor Frank Dickinson, crowned Southern Methodist University (SMU) as the best in the nation. A poll of newspaper writers, taken at year's end—by United Press rather than the AP—concluded that Minnesota was the best in the nation.

The 1956 NCAA University Division football season saw the University of Oklahoma Sooners finish a third consecutive season unbeaten and untied to again win the national championship.

The 1949 college football season finished with four teams that were unbeaten and untied-- Notre Dame, Oklahoma, California, and Army had won all their games at season's end. Notre Dame, however, was the overwhelming choice for national champion in the AP Poll, with 172 of 208 first place votes. The Fighting Irish did not participate in the New Year's Day bowl games, which were played on January 2, 1950.

The 1937 college football season ended with the Panthers of the University of Pittsburgh being named the nation's No. 1 team by 30 of the 33 voters in the Associated Press writers' poll. The AP poll was in its second year, and seven votes were taken during the final weeks of the 1937 season, starting with October 18. Each writer listed his choice for the top ten teams, and points were tallied based on 10 for first place, 9 for second, etc., and the AP then ranked the twenty teams with the highest number of points. With 33 writers polled, Pitt received 30 first place votes and 3 second-place, for a total of 327 points.

The 1938 college football season ended with the Horned Frogs of Texas Christian University (TCU) being named the nation's No. 1 team by 55 of the 77 voters in the final Associated Press writers' poll in early December. Tennessee is also recognized as a national champion; both teams won every game.

The 1939 college football season concluded with the Aggies of The Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas being named as the national champions by the voters in the Associated Press writers' poll.

The 1940 college football season ended with the Gophers of the University of Minnesota being named the nation's No. 1 team and national champion by the AP Poll, and the Stanford University Indians in second, with the two teams receiving 65 and 44 first place votes respectively. Each writer listed his choice for the top ten teams, and points were tallied based on 10 for first place, 9 for second, etc., and the AP then ranked the twenty teams with the highest number of points. Minnesota, Stanford, Boston College, and Tennessee all claim 1940 as a national championship season.

The 1941 college football regular season was the 73rd season of intercollegiate football in the United States. Competition included schools from the Big Ten Conference, the Pacific Coast Conference (PCC), the Southeastern Conference (SEC), the Big Six Conference, the Southern Conference, the Southwestern Conference, and numerous smaller conferences and independent programs.

References

  1. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2011-10-05. Retrieved 2009-01-20.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  2. "Gophers Given Big Edge Over Other Grid Squads", The Sheboygan (Wis.) Press, Oct. 20, 1936, p10
  3. "Wildcats Smash Gophers' Long Gridiron Dynasty, 6–0", Wisconsin State Journal, Oct. 31, 1936, p9
  4. "1936 Border Intercollegiate Athletic Association Year Summary". SR/College Football. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved November 9, 2018.
  5. Grantland Rice, from North American News syndicate, quoted in "Panthers Turn Rose Bowl into 21 to 0 Rout", Lincoln (Neb.) State Journal, Jan. 2, 1937, p7
  6. "Santa Clara Scores Twice First Period To Trip L.S.U. 21-14", Lincoln (Neb.) State Journal, Jan. 2, 1937, p7
  7. "Slingin' Sam Rifles Texas Christian to 16-6 Bowl Conquest", Lincoln (Neb.) State Journal, Jan. 2, 1937, p7
  8. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2011-11-29. Retrieved 2011-12-02.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  9. "Dukes' Passes Down Mississippi, 13 to 12", Lincoln (Neb.) State Journal, Jan. 2, 1937, p7
  10. "Heisman Trophy". heisman.com. Archived from the original on January 6, 2008. Retrieved 2015-12-03.
  11. "The 10 most controversial champions in college football history". Saturday Down South. 2014-10-28. Retrieved 2020-05-24.
  12. "Fixing the 1936 AP Poll". tiptop25.com. Retrieved 2020-05-24.
  13. "The Funniest Name in Football : Colleges: Slippery Rock officials know it could be worse. The school could have been named Wechachochapohka". Los Angeles Times. 1989-11-24. Retrieved 2020-05-24.
  14. "The Rock Mystique". Slippery Rock University Athletics. Retrieved 2020-05-24.
  15. "Mathematically St. Vincent Champion". The Indiana Gazette. 1936-12-01. p. 18. Retrieved 2020-05-24.
  16. "ALL HATS OFF TO LITTLE ST. THOMAS NATIONAL CHAMP (?)". The Gazette and Daily. 1936-11-24. p. 10. Retrieved 2020-05-24.