1885 college football season

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The 1885 college football season had no clear-cut champion, with the Official NCAA Division I Football Records Book listing Princeton as having been selected national champions. [1] The season was notable for one of the most celebrated football plays of the 19th century - a 90-yard punt return by Henry "Tillie" Lamar of Princeton in the closing minutes of the game against Yale. Trailing 5–0, Princeton dropped two men back to receive a Yale punt. The punt glanced off one returner's shoulder and was caught by the other, Lamar, on the dead run. [2] Lamar streaked down the left sideline, until hemmed in by two Princeton players, then cut sharply to the middle of the field, ducking under their arms and breaking loose for the touchdown. After the controversy of a darkness-shortened Yale-Princeton championship game the year before that was ruled "no contest," a record crowd turned out for the 1885 game. For the first time, the game was played on one of the campuses instead of at a neutral site, and emerged as a major social event, attracting ladies to its audience as well as students and male spectators. [3] The Lamar punt return furnished the most spectacular ending to any football game played to that point, and did much to popularize the sport of college football to the general public.

Conference standings

The following is a potentially incomplete list of conference standings:

1885 college football records
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Princeton     900
Michigan     300
Colorado College     100
Yale     710
Cincinnati     101
Penn     850
Lafayette     321
Massachusetts     321
Johns Hopkins     220
Richmond     110
Wesleyan     340
Navy     120
Lehigh     151
Rutgers     010
Fordham     030
1885 Northern Intercollegiate Football Association standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
Williams $    601
Tufts     23^0
  • $ Conference champion
  • ^ Alt source says 2–4–0 [4]

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1896 college football season

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1894 college football season

The 1894 college football season was the season of American football played among colleges and universities in the United States during the 1894–95 academic year.

1889 college football season

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1886 college football season

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References

  1. Official 2009 NCAA Division I Football Records Book (PDF). Indianapolis, IN: The National Collegiate Athletic Association. August 2009. p. 70. Retrieved 2009-10-16.
  2. Mark F. Bernstein (2009). Princeton Football. p. 15. ISBN   9780738565842.
  3. Parke H. Davis (1911). Football, the American Intercollegiate Game. c. Scribner's sons. parke davis football intercollegiate game.
  4. "Tufts Digital Library". dl.tufts.edu.